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THE

MOTHERS' FREASURY.

PARENTAL RESPONSIBILITY.

H

EADS of families, what responsibilities rest upon us! We cannot shake them off, let us do what we may! God has given us little kingdoms, in which our authority and influence will tell for the better or the worse to all eternity. There is not a child or a servant in our house but what will be impressed for good or for evil by what we do. True, we may

have no wish to influence them, and we may endeavour to ignore our responsibility, but it cannot be done; parental influence is a throne which no man can abdicate. The members of our family come under our shadow, and we either drip poison upon them like a deadly upas, or else beneath our shade they breathe an atmosphere perfumed with our piety. The little boats are fastened to our larger vessel, and are drawn along in our wake. O fathers and mothers, the ruin of your children or their salvation will, under God, very much depend upon you! The gracious Spirit may use you for their conversion, or Satan may employ you as the instruments of their destruction. Which is it like to be ? I charge you, consider. If the clouds be full of rain, they empty themselves upon the earth ; let us pray to be as clouds of grace to our families. Whether we have only an Isaac and an Ishmael like Abraham, or twelve children like Jacob, let us pray for each and all that they may live before the Lord, and that we and all that belong to us may be bound up in the bundle of life.

Oh, I could sigh to think of the capacities which lie dormant in some Christians! It is sad to think how their children might grow up, and with God's blessing become pillars in the house of the Lord, and perhaps ministers of the gospel, under the influence of an earnest consecrated father and mother; but instead thereof the dulness, the lukewarmness, the worldliness, and the inconsistencies of parents, are hindering the children from coming to Christ, hampering them as to any great advances in the divine life, dwarfing their stature in grace, and doing them lifelong injury. Brethren, you do not know the possibilities which are in you when God's Spirit rests upon you; but this much is certain, if you yourselves be called into a higher form of divine life, you shall then become mediums of blessing to your relatives. Your husband, your

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HINTS FOR THE HOUSEHOLD.
SAGE DRINK.

warms shut them up tightly, and Pour a quart of boiling water

be as chary as possible of opening on a teacupful of sage leaves ;

them again during the heat of the sweeten with black currant

day. A house well closed will any jam ; add a squeeze of lemon keep cool for many hours while to taste. When cold strain. the external heat is unbearable.

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The secret is, to catch the cold TAPIOCA JELLY.

air when you can; and when you Wash a teacupful of tapioca, have got it, keep it jealously. If soak it for three hours in cold the outer air grows cold during water, turn off the water, and the day, and your rooms are pour over it one quart of boiling warmer at the time, open windows water. Add a grated peel of one and get a cooling; but otherwise lemon. Sweeten to taste and

keep all closed. Generally obserre boil for one hour.

this maxim (a couple of comır.'' ON COOKING GREENS." thermometers, one indoors, Liu Every housewife thinks she

other out, will help you), can cook greens.” It is the Warmer out than in, keep she!

colder out than in, throw open. simplest of all dishes : and yet in most cases they are not well

STAIR CARPETS. served, for much depends upon Stair carpets should also the manner in which they are have a slip of paper puł wydens boiled. The water should be soft, them, at and over the edge on and a tablespoonful of salt added every stair—which is the to a large-sized pot of it, which where they first wear ont-should be boiling hot when the order to lessen the friction of 14 greens are thrown in, and then

carpets against the boards it should be kept on the boiling neath. The strips should gallop, but uncovered, until they within an inch or two, as lo are done, which can be told by the carpet is wide, and abon their sinking to the bottom of the or five inches in breadth, 30 pot, and they should be skimmed lie a little distance upon out as quickly as possible into a stair. This simple plaan colander, so that all the water will preserve a stair carpet run out.

Press them, with a long again as it would small plate, then turn upon a out the strips of paper. platter, add a piece of butter, and

FOR THE STING OF cut up fine. Serve while smoking

OTHER INSEOT hot.

Wet the part stung A HINT FOR HOT WEATHER. piece of indigo upon it, Exclude the hot air as rigidly in instantly remove the pre summer as you do the cold air in STING OF A NETTLE winter. Open all your casements

PLANT early in the morning, as nearly at Rub the part affect sunrise as your uprisings permit, rosemary, mint, or for that is the coldest time of the matic herb, and the whole day; but when the morning once cease.

Buy what vou dinna want, and you will sell what you

them like a deadly apas, cere

THE

ifficult to accomplish vays and whims must

little light; too much 'ting cause of sleepless

ect silence and perfect iny people, will certainly e alone will keep people

bed being so chilly that PARENTAL RESPONSIRS

tmosphere made by the

less. A room that gets EADS of families, what

wrong height of pillow We cannot shake them

u is a very good thing in God has given us little

lengthways, so as to raise thority and influence med small pillow under the WORSE to all eternits.

a small pillow, about eight servant in our house

the sleepless person is lying for good or for en

If the neck and head are iar no wish to

cases, be no sleep. A light, deavor to ignore our responsibi

1 held up to the neck, and just influencia throne which no

be breathed through, will give our family come under our shu

hr the sick person to put himself

ertain any thought; keeping the an atmosphere perfumed with

zlar; letting, as it were, the whole emed to our larger vessel, a.

te of inaction, will put a person to fathers and mothers, the

intend and try to sleep, would lie will, under God, wery man

brought a feverish, unsatisfactory may use you for their com

pry is impossible. instruments of their charge you, consider themselves upon the

OLDED LAMB. our families. Whe

aven, But now I know that all is well,

And fear for her no more. Abraham, or turele

given,

Before one rising cloud could dim white.

Her sky, or drop in tears, [Him

Christ came and took her home with Oh, I could

To summer all the years. in some Chris

I often think, where she has gone grow up, and

What honour great I bear,
Lw me,

That I have one before the throne

Who calls me "mother” there! She is with Christ—and I am His;

Round Him our hearts entwine; noweth best : And though far up the heights of bliss,

In heaven she still is mine.

And oh! when I my own shall meet, Store.

Together we shall go, I cannot And cast our crowns before His feet, e; [tell; And learn His love to know !

Quiver.

that they may long to us may

lee;

the Lord, ani of an earnes the dulness tencies of hampering dwarfing Breth God's selves come

[graphic]

Do

wife, your child, your friend, and the whole of your family shall be the better for your advance in spiritual things.

Look ye well, brethren, to yourselves; ye cannot bless your children, ye cannot bless your households, till first of all upon yourselves the anointing of the Lord doth rest. O Spirit of the living God! breathe upon us, that we may live yet more abundantly, and then shall we be chosen vessels to bear the name of Jesus to others ! 0. H. Spurgeon.

THE CONVERSION OF CHILDREN.
ASSING through a street in Belfast one day, I was

told that a little boy in the house, No. 4, was very
ill. I called. He was a stranger to me.

I found him in bed. “What ails you, my dear boy?” said I. “Oh, my sins, sir! I cannot bear the weight of my sins,

you feel that you are a sinner ?Oh, sir, I am the chief of sinners." “And what are you doing?” “I am praying to Jesus.“And what are you asking Jesus to do for you ?” “To take away my sins.” He was coiled up in bed, his little hands firmly clasped. Even while I spoke to him, and pointed to the Lamb of God, he continued in earnest prayer. When I called again, he was full of joy. He had found the Messiah. I asked him, “Is there anything you would like to do for Jesus ?" His reply was, “I would like to bring all my brothers and sisters and the whole world to Him."

A messenger came one evening and said to me, “Such a lad, one of your Sabbath scholars, has found Christ.” I went immediately to the house. He was there, but not alone. , A number of his companions, little boys, had gathered in. What did this child do? He was not ashamed of Jesus, or afraid to tell what He had done for his own soul. He appealed to his companions about their souls. He told them what he felt; how happy he was; what Jesus had done for him. He proposed to pray for them, and they all knelt down. I heard that prayer. It was most simple, touching, and earnest. Before I left, one of the boys present was enabled “to believe, and to give his heart to Jesus." The two little fellows embraced each other. How they spoke of the love of Christ, of the power of His Spirit, of their own joy! How, in the presence of all, they encouraged each other to stand firm, and cleave to Jesus !

In our Sabbath-schools and families children grow up unconverted because they are not personally dealt with. Lord, sharpen our sickles when we go to reap Thy harvest among the young; for we have heard our Master say, “Have ye not read, Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings Thou hast perfected praise ?“ SUFFER LITTLE CHILDREN TO COME UNTO ME, AND FORBID

THEM NOT."

SLEEP. OING to sleep is a matter very difficult to accomplish with some people. A patient's ways and whims must be studied. Too much light, too little light; too much noise, too little noise—the exciting cause of sleeplessness must be found out. Perfect silence and perfect darkness, though necessary to many people, will certainly keep others awake. Being quite alone will keep people

awake. The lower part of the bed being so chilly that the knees get drawn up into the warmer atmosphere made by the heat of the body, is a cause of sleeplessness. A room that gets

stuffy” will keep people awake. A wrong height of pillow is a constant source of wakefulness. It is a very good thing in these cases to place the upper pillow lengthways, so as to raise the shoulders a little. A wedge-shaped small pillow under the neck will also relieve the head, and a small pillow, about eight inches square, under the shoulder, if the sleepless person is lying sideways, will ease the body also. If the neck and head are wrongly placed, there will, in many cases, be no sleep. A light, warm, wool shawl taken into bed and held up to the neck, and just so far in front of the mouth as to be breathed through, will give sleep. It is often quite possible for the sick person to put himself to sleep. A quiet refusal to entertain any thought; keeping the eyes shut, and the breathing regular; letting, as it were, the whole body and mind drop into a state of inaction, will put a person to sleep, who, if he did not thus intend and try to sleep, would lie awake till downright weariness brought a feverish, unsatisfactory repose. Without sleep recovery is impossible.

THE FOLDED LAMB.
HAVE a little child in heaven, But now I know that all is well,
A dear one angel-bright;

And fear for her no more.

Before one rising cloud could dim And garments pure and white.

Her sky, or drop in tears, [Him She stands upon the crystal sea, Christ came and took her home with Before the throne above,

To summer all the years. With harp and palm of victory, I often think, where she has gone And sings the song of love.

What honour great I bear, I miss the hands that clung to me, That I have one before the throne And made my heart so glad ;

Who calls me "mother" there! I miss her prattle and her glee; She is with Christ and I am His; And I am very sad.

Round Him our hearts entwine; God's will be done-He knoweth best : And though far up the heights of bliss, Her wanderings are o'er ;

In heaven she still is mine. My little lamb is safe at rest

And oh! when I my own shall meet, Where sin can hurt no more.

Together we shall go, She might have strayed—I cannot And cast our crowns before His feet, Christ knew what lay before ; [tell ; And learn His love to know !

Quiver.

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