Imatges de pàgina
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“O LORD, HOW MANIFOLD ARE THY WORKS! IN WISDOM HAST THOU

MADE THEM ALL.”—Ps. civ. 24.

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THE DAISY.
HAT hand but His who arched the skies,

And pours the day-spring's living flood,

Wondrous alike in all He tries,
Could raise the daisy's purple bud,
Mould its green cup, its wiry stem,

Its fringed border nicely spin,
And cut the gold-embossèd gem,

That, set in silver, gleams within,
And fling it, unrestrained and free,

O'er hill and dale, and desert sod;
That man, where'er he walks, may see
At every step the stamp of God?

MASON Good.

DEATH-SONG OF ONE BORN BLIND.
Op HE night far spent ! the day at Death strikes the fetters from my eyes
hand!

And sets them free:
D
Oh, can it be

In darkness I lie down, to rise
That I am near the far-off land

And ever see.
Where I shall see?

What now to me would all the light
And will my day no more be night?

Of this world be?
Will there for me

Far better darkness now, and bright
Be light, the everlasting light

Eternity.
I long to see ?

Thanks for the long long years of
And shall these eyes the King behold, night
His beauty see?

So blest to me ;
The Shepherd of the world-wide fold For faith on earth,-in heaven for
In majesty!

sight O tell me not death's shadow falls

Eternally.
So gloomily;

And thanks for every other sense
My shadows are departing all,

Quickened by Thee,
For I shall see!

A goodly, kindly recompense
And say not night is coming fast;

Vouchsafed to me. 'Tis dawn to me :

For every cloud of this dark land,
My life-long night is well-nigh past,

Thanks be to Thee;
Morning I see.

Brightening the glories of that strand
All my life through, my prayer has

To which I flee. been

There is my own, my angel wife,
For purity;

Waiting for me :
For they whose hearts are pure from The face I never saw in life,
sin

Now, now I'll see.
Their God shall see.

Weep not, my friends and children,
And Thou hast kept me pure in heart; who
Therefore to Thee

My dying see :
I come, for ever as Thou art

The cloud that's falling upon you
Thy face to see.

Brings light to me.
Why did I pine for sight, or crave Surely the day is breaking ;-hark,
Earth's light to see?.

It calleth me!
My blindness helps to rob the grave No more these sightless eyes are dark:
Of victory,

I see! I see !

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“ O LORD, HOW MANIFOLD ARE THY WORKS! IN WISDOM HAST THOU

MADE THEM ALL.”—Ps. civ. 24.

THE DAISY.
HAT hand but His who arched the skies,

And pours the day-spring's living flood,

Wondrous alike in all He tries,
Could raise the daisy's purple bud,
Mould its green cup, its wiry stem,

Its fringed border nicely spin,
And cut the gold-embossèd gem,

That, set in silver, gleams within,
And fling it, unrestrained and free,

O'er hill and dale, and desert sod;
That man, where'er he walks, may see
At every step the stamp of God ?

MASON GOOD.

DEATH-SONG OF ONE BORN BLIND. SHE night far spent ! the day at Death strikes the fetters from my eyes hand!

And sets them free:
D
Oh, can it be

In darkness I lie down, to rise
That I am near the far-off land

And ever see.
Where I shall see ?

What now to me would all the light And will my day no more be night ?

Of this world be ?
Will there for me

Far better darkness now, and bright Be light the everlasting light

Eternity.
I long to see?

Thanks for the long long years of
And shall these eyes the King behold, night
His beauty see?

So blest to me; The Shepherd of the world-wide fold For faith on earth,-in heaven for In majesty!

sight O tell me not death's shadow falls

Eternally.
So gloomily;

And thanks for every other sense My shadows are departing all,

Quickened by Thee,
For I shall see!

A goodly, kindly recompense

Vouchsafed to me. And say not night is coming fast; 'Tis dawn to me :

For every cloud of this dark land, My life-long night is well-nigh past,

Thanks be to Thee;
Morning I see.

Brightening the glories of that strand All my life through, my prayer has

To which I flee. been

There is my own, my angel wife,
For purity;

Waiting for me :
For they whose hearts are pure from The face I never saw in life,
sin

Now, now I'll see.
Their God shall see.

Weep not, my friends and children, And Thou hast kept me pure in heart;

who Therefore to Thee

My dying see :-
I come, for ever as Thou art

The cloud that's falling upon you
Thy face to see.

Brings light to me.
Why did I pine for sight, or crave Surely the day is breaking ;-hark,
Earth's light to see?

It calleth me! My blindness helps to rob the grave No more these sightless eyes are dark: Of victory.

I see! I see!

HINTS FOR THE HOUSEHOLD,
SAGE DRINK.

warms shut them up tightly, and Pour a quart of boiling water

be as chary as possible of opening on a teacupful of sage leaves ;

them again during the heat of the sweeten with black currant or

day. A house well closed will any jam ; add a squeeze of lemon keep cool for many hours while to taste. When cold strain. the external heat is unbearable.

The secret is, to catch the cold TAPIOCA JELLY.

air when you can; and when you Wash a teacupful of tapioca, have got it, keep it jealously. If soak it for three hours in cold the outer air grows cold during water, turn off the water, and

the day, and your rooms are pour over it one quart of boiling warmer at the time, open windows water. Add a grated peel of one and get a cooling; but otherwise lemon. Sweeten to taste and

keep all closed. Generally observe boil for one hour.

this maxim (a couple of common ON COOKING GREENS." thermometers, one indoors, the

other out, will help you),– Every housewife thinks she can cook « greens.” It is the

Warmer out than in, keep shut;

colder out than in, throw simplest of all dishes : and yet

open. in most cases they are not well

STAIR CARPETS. served, for much depends upon Stair carpets should always the manner in which they are have a slip of paper put under boiled. The water should be soft, them, at and over the edge of and a tablespoonful of salt added every stair—which is the part to a large-sized pot of it, which where they first wear out-in should be boiling hot when the order to lessen the friction of the greens are thrown in, and then

carpets against the boards beit should be kept on the boiling neath. The strips should be, gallop, but uncovered, until they within an inch or two, as long as are done, which can be told by the carpet is wide, and about four their sinking to the bottom of the or five inches in breadth, so as to pot, and they should be skimmed lie a little distance upon each out as quickly as possible into a stair. This simple plan will colander, so that all the water will preserve a stair carpet half run out.

Press them, with a long again as it would last with. small plate, then turn upon a

out the strips of paper. platter, add a piece of butter, and

FOR THE STING OF A WASP, OR cut up fine. Serve while smoking

OTHER INSECT. hot.

Wet the part stung, and rub a A HINT FOR HOT WEATHER. piece of indigo upon it, which will Exclude the hot air as rigidly in instantly remove the pain. summer as you do the cold air in STING OF A NETTLE OR OTHER winter. Open all your casements

PLANT. early in the morning, as nearly at Rub the part affected with balm, sunrise as your uprisings permit, rosemary, mint, or any other arofor that is the coldest time of the matic herb, and the smart will at whole day; but when the morning once cease.

Buy what vou dinna want, and you will sell what you canna spare."

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