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THE

MOTHERS' FREASURY.

ENCOURAGEMENT TO PRAYING MOTHERS.

HE influence of a loving mother is felt by her

absent children as well as by those at home. The memory of her tenderness, her counsel, and her example, is often a safeguard against temptation, and her words of advice often guide into

the right way, against the impulses of passion and the wayward desires of the heart. At one of the recent prayer-meetings a young man rose and said :

I wanted to tell you a little of my own story-how the Lord led me to this meeting. It was by the means of a praying mother three thousand miles away. She, of course, has never been in this meeting; but away in her island home, she has heard and read of the wonderful answers to prayer which are bestowed here. Hearing this, and reading the reports of this meeting, she, a godly, praying mother, wrote to me, living here in New York, telling me what she had heard of the Fulton Street prayer-meeting, and begging me to go to it. I kept that request by me some time before I paid any attention to it. I cared nothing about religion, and since leaving home had greatly neglected the means of grace. At length I thought of writing to my mother, and I thought I would like to tell her that I had been into the Fulton Street prayer-meeting. Accordingly, on last Christmas day I came here for the first time. I entered these doors for no other purpose than to be able to say to my poor, praying mother, I had been here. I expected that would be the end of it, and coming here once would satisfy her and me.

I came into the meeting, and got into this corner where I now am, and took my seat to sit out the hour. But what an hour that was to me! God smote my heart, which was as hard as a rock. Before the meeting was half over, I was overwhelmed with such a sense of sin that I did not know what to do. The next day I came again, and the next, and so on.

I could not stay away. I was in extreme anguish of mind, and had no rest night nor day. I said nothing to any one of my feelings. I have no one among my friends to whom I could open my heart. Here I came, and sat down in this corner, day after day; and no one but God knew what a load of sin and guilt lay on my soul.

One day I came in here, and it seemed as if I should sink into

HINTS FOR THE HOUSEHOLD.

GLADNESS AND HEALTH.

SIR HENRY THOMPSON ON

TO TAKE INK-STAINS OUT OF ALCOHOLIC DRINKS.

MAHOGANY. “Habitual, or, as it is usually Touch the part with a feather called, moderate drinking, is a dipped in a weak solution of vitthing which people should avoid riol; rub it quickly off, and if the if they wished to have a sound stain be not removed, repeat the mind in a sound body; that is the operation : or in recent ink-stains, reason why I myself touch nothing put a little salt of lemons on the but water."

spot, and rub off with a cloth wetted in hot water.

TO RELIEVE ASTHMA. Joy is one of the greatest pana Soak some blotting paper in a ceas of life.

No joy is more healthful, or better calculated to it, take a piece about the size of

strong solution of saltpetre; dry prolong life, than that which is to be found in domestic happiness, light it, and lay it upon a plate in

your hand, and on going to bed, in the company of cheerful and good men, and in contemplating your bedroom. By doing so, per

sons, however badly afflicted with with delight the beauties of nature.

asthma, will find that they can A day spent in the country, under

sleep almost as well as when in a serene sky, amidst a circle of

health. Many have experienced agreeable friends, is certainly a

relief from the use of this specific. more positive means of prolonging life than all the vital elixirs in the

LEMONADE. world. Laughter, that external Rasp the rind of a lemon on expression of joy, must not here some lumps of sugar, or pare it be omitted. It is the most salu very thin, and pour half a pint of tary of all the bodily movements, boiling water on it, adding the for it agitates both the body and sugar and juice. Orangeade is the soul at the same time; pro

made in the same way. motes digestion, circulation, and perspiration, and enlivens the vipower in every organ.-Hufe- and crumb, into a bowl, with suf

Put the scraps of bread, crust land.

ficient milk to cover them well.

Cover with a saucepan-lid or plate, Never use water for drinking and put into the oven to soak for that is not quite colourless, and half an hour. Take it out and without smell or taste ; if there is

mash the bread with a fork until any doubt of its purity, and you it is a pulp; then add a handful have no filter, boil it.

of raisins and as many currants,

a teaspoonful of brown sugar, TO PRESERVE EGGS.

half a cup of milk, some candied Put them for one minute in lemon peel, and one egg. Stir it water just about to boil, and they up well, grease a pudding dish, will afterwards keep well for a and pour the pudding in. Grate month; or if soaked a little while over a little nutmeg, put it into a in sweet oil, they will keep for moderate oven, and let it bake for

an hour and a half.

SCRAP PUDDING.

PURE WATER.

half a year.

THE

MOTHERS FREASURY.

ENCOURAGEMENT TO PRAYING MOTHERS.

HE influence of a loving mother is felt by her

absent children as well as by those at home. The memory of her tenderness, her counsel, and her example, is often a safeguard against temptation, and her words of advice often guide into

the right way, against the impulses of passion and the wayward desires of the heart. At one of the recent prayer-meetings a young man rose and said:

I wanted to tell you a little of my own story-how the Lord led me to this meeting. It was by the means of a praying mother three thousand miles away. She, of course, has never been in this meeting ; but away in her island home, she has heard and read of the wonderful answers to prayer which are bestowed here. Hearing this, and reading the reports of this meeting, she, a godly, praying mother, wrote to me, living here in New York, telling me what she had heard of the Fulton Street prayer-meeting, and begging me to go to it. I kept that request by me some time before I paid any attention to it. I cared nothing about religion, and since leaving home had greatly neglected the means of grace. At length I thought of writing to my mother, and I thought I would like to tell her that I had been into the Fulton Street prayer-meeting. Accordingly, on last Christmas day I came here for the first time. I entered these doors for no other purpose than to be able to say to my poor, praying mother, I had been here. I expected that would be the end of it, and coming here once would satisfy her and me.

I came into the meeting, and got into this corner where I now am, and took my seat to sit out the hour. But what an hour that was to me! God smote my heart, which was as hard as a rock. Before the meeting was half over, I was overwhelmed with such a sense of sin that I did not know what to do. The next day I came again, and the next, and so on. I could not stay away. I was in extreme anguish of mind, and had no rest night nor day. I said nothing to any one of my feelings. I have no one among my friends to whom I could open my heart. Here I came, and sat down in this corner, day after day; and no one but God knew what a load of sin and guilt lay on my soul.

One day I came in here, and it seemed as if I should sink into

hell. I felt that nothing could do me any good; and here, in this corner, I sought the Lord, and He heard me, and delivered me out of all my trouble, and put a new song into my mouth, even praise to the living God. Jesus I laid hold of by faith as my Saviour; and I gave myself up to Him, and was soon lost in wonder, love, and praise.

In my distress I had forgotten all about writing to my dear mother. But when the Lord had mercy upon me, and forgave me all my sins, I felt that I must send a winged messenger to my mother; and I told her all about my coming here, and the great change which had come over me. What news that was to send back to my praying mother—that a careless, prayerless, young man-a wanderer, neglecting all the means of grace—had found salvation here, in and through the Lord Jesus Christ !

Now, I want to say one word to the many mothers who are here, to encourage them to pray and believe for their children that God is a covenant-keeping God, and He will hear and answer your prayers. The answer may come late. It may come long after you are asleep in death. But if you will believe God, it will come. I stand here a monument of God's mercy and grace, because I had a mother who prayed for me, and who believed as well as prayed. Oh, if I could encourage one mother to have more faith in God, my object in coming here to-day would be accomplished. I want you to have confidence in God, and to believe that He will fulfil all His promises.

There was a peculiar unction and earnestness in this young man's words, the power of which could be seen in the glistening tears which fell from many eyes.

FAMILY RELIGION.

EXTRACTS FROM THE CORRESPONDENCE OF THE LATE

REV. EDWARD BICKERSTETH.

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VERY thing good must begin with our own souls, in an

entire surrender of our hearts to the Lord ; to His will, His word, and His glory, as our highest interest and clearest duty, our richest privilege, our only happiness, and by free grace the path in which we may walk, as well as ought to walk.

Our children call for much thought and prayer, not

mainly as regards their education for this world, but their education for eternity ; ever remembering that to teach them self-denial is to lay the right foundation for their future happiness, and to indulge them now in self-gratifying things is the way to make them miserable in all their after-life. To be the disciple of Christ is to be truly happy for time and for eternity; and in aiming at this we are the wisest and kindest parents to our children ;

and all that seems kind and considerate, when not according to this, is really in the end unkindness and cruelty. Now to be disciples of Christ, we and they must deny ourselves, take up our cross and follow Him. Oh may we ever have grace to bring up our dear children on these principles with united heart, that they may be a comfort to us, a blessing to the Church and to their country, and to families that may spring from them; so that our joy through eternity may be greatly enlarged by their Christian education !

May we lead them early to Christ, lead them to cry earnestly to Him for His Spirit, and show them that there is now, in this day of grace, free, full, and complete deliverance, salvation, life, and glory for them. Oh may our God fulfií His promise : "I will pour My Spirit upon thy seed, and My blessing upon thy offspring,” etc. May you and I, my love, plead those precious promises in prayer for our dear children. They are our jewels, if they be Christ's jewels. They will be our thorns, if it be not our constant aim to bring them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. I know you agree with me in this, but we need to have our minds stirred up by way of remembrance. In our household, may God ever give us Joshua's determination,

-“ As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.” I believe that this has been our aim, but it has been feebly executed. It includes our property, to be all laid out as we shall wish it had been in the day of Christ; and here I have been guilty of vain expense about books.

It includes the religion of our servants; and here I think I have not duly attended to the males, nor you to the females, so as to be often speaking for their spiritual good. There has not been a neglect in the family religious duties, except as to their full improvement; but there has not been that private and personal application, which is the most efficient mode of making the public means really profitable.

Now in all these things, my dearest wife, I wish to act simply on the principles of the Gospel of Christ, and to give to each duty its due share of attention. You must help me in this, by sacrificing lesser desires and pleasures, that might interfere with primary duties, and by praying that I may have grace and strength, amidst all corruptions within, and all seductions from without, steadily to walk, by the strength of Christ, in that path which will bring peace at the last, and most promote our Father's glory and the good of all around us. Depend upon it, the more I am devoted to Christ, and the more you help me in this, the more I shall be d blessing to you and to our family, and all that troubles us at any time may be traced originally, to a neglected Christ and a disobeyed Gospel.

The Lord bless you, my love, and enable us to walk more closely with Him. Love to all my dear tribe at home.

Ever affectionately yours, August, 1833.

E. BICKERSTETH.

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