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will constitute my happiness, and that of time, even a lover's vow will be taken on ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE. France.' 'Is it possible,' remarked the em- trust. A graver fault we have to find with

Paris, Oct. 18. press, to be more amiable, than thus to en- this writer, is the religious turn he has given The moment approaches which is to decide deavour to soften what at this moment would the subject'; for Christianity has a better foun. the fate of theatrical literature. Shakespeare's have been painful to me, if I did not so sin- dation than popular superstitions. Yet our tragedies are à l'étude ; and the public look cerely love the emperor! This bringing toge author is a well-meaning, but injudicious advo- anxiously for the promised regeneration in ther (rapprochement) of my son and his, is cáte-supernatural revealings are not in the the dramatic art. Much must depend on the worthy of the man who, when he wishes to spirit of a religion as much based on reason prudence of innovators on old systems to make be so, is more insinuating than any other.' as on faith, and whose empire, having stood good their cause, otherwise the ancient us

When M. de Saint Hilaire came the test of ages, needs now no miracles to en-(which M. de la Vigne affections as though to receive her majesty's orders : " That is for force it on the mind.

his happiness both here and hereafter depended the emperor, and that for you,' said she to

on that monosyllable) will resume its power, him, giving him her answer and a little red- The Sailor, or the Coquet Cottages and other and composition will be clad in all its former morocco case, containing a diamond pin worth Poems. By W. Gibson.

12mo. pp. 104. classic armour. five thousand francs."

Cowie and Strange.

M. Mallarme, who was detected of fraud in We understand that these interesting Me. An unpretending provincial effort, which, the Post-office, 'excites a very general interest moirs

, a translation of which will appear in though it can hope for little notice in the in his favour. It is supposed by some that a few days, were written by Madarne Ducrest, metropolis, may find friends amid its local matters will be hashed up, as a public exathe niece of Madame de Genlis. scenery, Northumberland.

mination would bring to light what it is the Sacred Songs. By W. Petter. 18mo. pp. 132. interest of government to keep secret. Every The Jew Erile; a Pedestrian Tour and Resi.

Longman and Co.

effort is making to have him released.

Colonel Fabbier's arrival here has happily dence in the Highlands and Íslands of Scot.

PARAPHRASES and imitations of Psalms and land, under Persecution. 2 vols. 12mo. Lon: portions of Scripture, of a pleasing order, and given a turn to conversation. Anecdotes with

regard to him multiply into volumes ; and facts don, 1828. Wilson. deserving of a kindly reception from the re

are related, which I am quite persuaded he The Jew Exile, and under persecution, leads ligious publie.

never heard of: he will make the fortune of us to expect a tale of religious opinions, op- Richard Cæur de Lion.

Hurst, some anonymous biographer. posed and supported by that enthusiastic faith,

Chance, and Co.

I am happy to announce that the beggar in which human prejudices form too large á “ Power” and “gore" are not rhymes ; and trade is reformed: those who have no means part. No such thing; it is a question of debts, altogether this poem has nothing to have recom- of existence are forced to accept the asylumi not creeds,—the persecutors are bailiffs; and mended it for publication.

which government offers, and resign their li. the Jew Exile is only an extravagant bankrupt,

berty. This law will prevent new hoards of running away from his creditors. Story there is a Manual of Mineralogy, in which is shewn country beggars from visiting the capital; and none; and the letters are rhapsodies, containing

how much Cornwall contributes to the Illus- the assassin from concealing his murderous subjects mingled in strange confusion ; most

tration of the Science. Post 8vo. pp. 245. intentions under the garb of rags. inflated descriptions of scenery; mouthings of London, 1828. Longman and Co.

A new invention for heating rooms has met misanthropy; occasional incidents, sketched A VERY copious, though a very concise, Ma- with much encouragement. A piece of quick. with the coarsest of all possible pens ;- in nual, and one calculated not only to illustrate lime dipped into water, and shut hermetically short, the whole is one of those productions the mineral productions of Cornwall, but gene- into a box constructed for the purpose, is said whose aim and origin it puzzles even a critic rally to interest and inform all the students of to give almost a purgatory heat, and prevent to discover: the motto of the title-page is its this important branch of science.

the necessity of fire during the winter. own and true character "All my faults perchance thou knowest Permanent and Field Fortification ; with At, its appearance in this capital, and convey pas

I hear that a steam coach is soon to make All my madnesy none can know."

tuck and Defence: for the Use of Schools and sengers to St. Cloud for half the price of the

Self-Instruction. By C. Irving, LL.D. 4to. Tales of the Affections. By Mrs. Caddick.

steam packet, which has the bad effect of des pp. 30. Longman and Co. London. 1 vol. 12mo. Longman and Co. We asked our friend the Captain, and he said stroying all the fish, and forcing fasters to

break ordinances. A PRETTY little volume, written with con- this was a very good work: for our parts, we siderable taste and feeling. The Soldier's Sis- know nothing about fortifications, never having the gambling world, owing to the easy acces.

Many fatal events have lately occurred in ter is a tale which will interest many a youth. been behind the curtain. ful reader, and is certainly the best in the book.

sion which all ranks have to the maisons de As for the Broken Vow, the hint is too evi- A few Observations on the Present State of the jeu: drowning or shooting generally finishes dently taken from the Surgeon's Daughter in Poor and Poor-Laws; and a Remedy for the

the career of the gamester; and desolate fathers the Chronicles of the Canongate ; and we think

Evils respecting them. By John Pole, Esq. their sons and husbands, as well as the ruin of

and widowed wives are left to weep the loss of there is a want of originality in some of the Commander in the Royal Navy.

their fortunes. CAPTAIN POLE remonstrates with great justice

Lotteries, too, are another Past Feelings renovated ; or, Ideas occasioned against the scandalous practice which has for source of misery; and it is curious to see several

those bureaux de fortune, at dawn of day,

years prevailed in some of the counties by the perusal of Dr. Hibbert's Philosophy of England, of reducing the wages of agricul. crowded by men and women, all of whom counteracting any Sentiments approaching to for their support, and then making up the defi

which are

to turn up; and these poor Materialism, which that Work, however un- ciency to them out of the poor-rates ; thus in. wretches often put their last wearable in intentional on the part of the Author, may solently affecting to bestow, in the degrading We have also patented professors in mystic

pledge to purchase the chance of a prize. have a tendency to produce. 12mo. pp. 323. shape of charity, that to which our honest and London, 1828. G. B. Whittaker. hard-working countrymen are fully entitled as

sciences, who hold forth to the public en IT is curious to observe the strong hold of pre- a matter of right! The remedy which the plein air, and, for the sum of two sons, the judice when in league with the imagination; gallant captain recommends, is (not a new one) would sell their birthright to buy a ticket in the love of the marvellous is such an inherent to let to every labouring man, at a moderate rent, the lottery of the numbers he indicates. passion, that in proportion as science makes half an acre or an acre of ground, for cultivadark places clear, and philosophy brings hidden tion at his leisure hours; and thus to enable

M. Carle Vernet, member of the Institute, truths to light, the mind clings the more obsti- him to gain a subsistence for himself and his is deputed by the French government to see nately to the few remaining penetralia of super- family, without undergoing the humiliation cute several works destined to ornament the stitious wonder left in the present age of dis- attendant on receiving assistance from the public, edifices in this city: In a fer covery. Alchymists, witches, rosicrucians, have

, at least parish. gradually faded from the mystic circle of belief;

as far as regards the beaur arts, and à l'An. and we fear, in spite of the efforts made by the Devotions for Schoolboys ; together with some glais as to la civilisation industrieuse. author of the present volume, ghosts must share Rules of Conduct given by a Father to his If French romances are admired in London, the same fate. We are no longer what Allan Son on going to School. Rivingtons. Le Soir, by M. Etienne, is the reigning faCunningham so well calls “ a fine believing A VERY, very small, but a very good book to vourite with fair Parisians. world ;" we analyse, examine, and philosophise be put into the hands of every schoolboy. It on every thing : we doubt whether, in a little is at once pious and rational.

rest.

| than ever I shall be a gainer by it; I mean | lows, for å scientifie letter, and the writer ORIGINAL LETTER OF DAVID HUME.

in point of his education. I beg of you to continues : [We are favoured with the MS. of this letter, which has have some inspection over him; and as often

" I have visited all the monuments in the though, being written to another celebrated individual, as my sister shall send to you to ask your environs. Pompey's Pillar has nothing remark. and on the first flush of David's flattering reception at advice, that you will be sure to give it. I am able in it. It rests on a solid base, composed the court of France, it seems to us to be one of the afraid that there occurs a difficulty at present of ancient fragments; and I have discovered most naive and interesting of his epistolary correspondence.]

about entering him to the Greek. He is too among them the cartouche of Psammetticus II. Fontainebleau, 9 Nov. 1763. far advanced by his learning for the class in I have not neglected the Greek inscription DEAR FERGUSON -I have now passed four the High School, to which he is put; and yet which belongs to the pillar, and respecting days at Paris, and about a fortnight in the he is too young to go to the college. For this which there are still some doubts. A good court at Fontainebleau, amidst a people who, reason I thought that he might learn some- impression on paper will put an end to them. from the royal family downwards, seem to have thing of the Greek before he finished his Latin I have visited more frequently the obelisks of it much at heart to persuade me, by every ex- course, as is the practice in England ; and ac- Cleopatra, always mounted on our asses, which pression of esteem, that they consider me as cordingly Murray, in Musselburgh, gave him the young Arabs call a bon cabal (a Provençal one of the greatest geniuses in the world. I some lessons in that language. I propose that denomination). Of these two obelisks, that am convinced that Louis XIV, never, in any he should continue on the same footing in which is standing has been given to the king three weeks of his life, suffered so much flat- Edinburgh ; but I am at a loss how it may be by the Pasha of Egypt, and I hope that proper tery, I say, suffered ; for it really confounds done. Å master to himself alone would not means will be adopted to convey this obelisk to and embarrasses me, and makes me look sheep- give him any emulation; and were he put to Paris ; that which lies on the ground belongs ish. Lord Hertford has told them that they any other school for this purpose, the hours to the English. I have already copied and had will chase me out of France, à coup des con- would interfere with those of the High School. drawings made, under my own eye, of their plémens et des louanges. Our friend General Be so good as to speak to Mathison, and then hieroglyphic inscriptions. For the first time, Clerk came to this place after I had passed a give your opinion to my sister.

therefore, I can say there will be an accurate week in it; and the first thing he said to me Please remember me to Mr. and Mrs. Adams. design of them. These two obelisks, with three was, that he was sure I had never passed so I saw Willy a moment at Fontainebleau ; he columns of characters on each face, were first many days with so little satisfaction. I asked had arrived a quarter of an hour after Jemmy erected by King Mæris, before the great Tem. him how he had happened to guess so well ; left it, whom I did not see. These two bro- ple of the Sun at Heliopolis. The lateral in. he said, because he knew me, and knew the thers have been hunting one another in vain scriptions are of Sesostris ; and I have disFrench. I really wish often for the plain through all France; but I hope they have met covered two other very short ones on the east roughness of the poker, and particularly the at last in Paris.

face, which are of the successor of Sesostris. sharpness of Dr. Jardine, to correct and qualify When you favour me with a letter, put it Thus three epochs are marked on these montso much lusciousness. However, I meet some- under cover to the Earl of Hertford, and direct ments. The antique dado of rose granite on times with incidents that please me, because it to him at Northumberland House in the which each of them was placed, still exists; they contain no mixture of French complai. Strand: letters so directed come to us with but setting my Arabs to dig, under the direcsance or exaggeration. Yesterday I dined at the greatest safety. Make my compliments to tion of our architect, M. Bibent, I have disa the Duc de Pralin's, the secretary of state. Baron Moore and Mrs. Moore, and to all that covered that this dado rests on a base with After we had risen from dinner, I went into family. I shall write to the baron soon. Tell three steps, which is of Greek or Roman work. a corner to converse with somebody; when I Dr. Blair that I have conversed here twice' or manship.”. saw enter the room a tall gentleman, a little thrice with the Duchesse D'Aiguillon, who The audience of the viceroy, on the 24th elderly, with a riband and star, who imme- has been amusing herself with translating pas- of August, at eight o'clock in the morning, diately called out to the Duchesse de Pralin, sages of Ossian; and I have assured her that is described ; but has nothing new to interest Ha! Madame la Duchesse, que je suis content ! the authenticity of those poems is to be proved readers, except that he gave the firmans nej'ai vu Monsieur Hume à la cour aujourd'hui. soon beyond all contradiction. Andrew Stew. cessary for the prosecution of the expedition, Upon inquiry, I was told he was a man of art is here at present: I met with nobody here and ordered two Tchaous of the viceroy to quality, esteemed one of the cleverest and most that doubts of the justice of his cause. I hope attend the party every where. sensible about the court.

your fine judges will at last be ashamed of M. C.'s letter concludes thus : In two or three days we return to Paris, their scandalous partiality. I should be glad '“ I intend to remain at Alexandria till the where I hope to live more at my ease, and shall to hear of all friends. I'am, dear Ferguson, 12th of September, to make our preparations. pass my time with really great men—for there with great sincerity, and without flattery, your The heat of Cairo, and a rather mild disorder, are such at present among the literati of France. affectionate friend and servant,

which prevails there, will have abated by that Certainly there is something perverse either in

David HUME. time. We are here in a country which is the structure of our mind or in the incidents

P.S. I beg you to keep the follies of the Europe in miniature ;-well received and reof life. My present

situation ought naturally above letter to yourself. I had a letter from galed by all the consuls of the West, who circumstances of an universal good reception is to pass the winter at Edinburgh. to appear an object of envy. For besides those Lord Marischal ko.day, who tells me, that he express the most lively interest in our enter

Wait

prise. We have been all together assembled from all ranks of people, nothing can be more often on him,- you will like him extremely :

successively at the residences of Messrs.

Acerbi, Rosetti, Anastazy, and Pedemonte, whom I live, and nothing can be more friendly carry all our friends: to him, and endeavour the consuls of Austria, Tuscany, Sweden, and than their behaviour to me. My fortune has to make him pass his time as agreeably as Sardinia ; I also met M. Mechin, the French already received a considerable increase by a possible.

consul at Larnaka, in Cyprus, who is one of pension procured me by Lord Hertford, and

those that accompanied the French expedition settled, as they tell me, for life. Mr. Bunbury LITERARY AND LEARNED.

to Egypt. has been told that he must not go to Paris,

“ I am full of confidence in the result of which my lord considers as a sure prelude to

our expedition ; may it answer the wishes of my being soon secretary to the embassy-an First Letters from M. de Champollion, Jun. the government and those of our friends! I office which will expose me to little expense,

Alerandria, Aug. 18th and 29th. will not spare myself in any respect to make it and bring me a thousand a year increase of Having described the voyage and arrival at succeed. I shall write from all the Egyptian revenue, and puts me in the road to all the Alexandria, Mr. C. says:

cities, though the post-offices of the Pharaohs great foreign employments. Yet I am sen. After a ride of half an hour, with many no longer exist in them. I shall reserve the sible that I set out too late, and that I am turnings and windings, we reached the resi- details of the wonders of Thebes for our misplaced ; and I wish twice or thrice a day dence of M. Drovetti, consul-general of France, venerable friend M. Dacier. Adieu ! for my easy chair, and my retreat in James's whose kind reception completed our satisfac

“ CHAMPOLLION, Jun.” Court. Never think, dear Ferguson, that astion. He enhanced his kindness by offering long as you are master of your own fire-side me a lodging in the palace of France. I have

FINE ARTS. and your own time, you can be unhappy, or that found in it a small and very agreeable apart

NEW PUBLICATIONS. any other circumstance can make an addition ment, formerly occupied by Kleber; and it The Gem. In his advertisements, the editor to your enjoyment.

not without lively emotion that I lay of the Gem has dwelt so slightly upon the emWhen I think of my own house, you may down in the alcove in which the victor of bellishments of his volume, that we are very believe I often reflect on Josey, who, I am Heliopolis slept."

agreeably surprised to find many of them afraid, will be more a loser by my absence A good deal of rather Gallic slip-stop fol. I quite admirable. “ The Widow," engraved by

EGYPT.

was

racter.

8. Davenport, from a picture by R. Leslie, R.A. / attentively contemplated and examined before subject. Georgiana, Duchess of Bedford,” is one of the sweetest and most affecting little its numerous beauties can be justly appreciated. engraved by C. Heath, from a picture by prints that we have yet seen ; and we are at a “ Love,” engraved by C. Heath, from a pic-E. Landseer, R.A. An elegant and dignified loss which to praise the more the composition ture by F. P. Stephanoff. Who could believe portrait. The head is streetly beautiful. It and expression of the painter, or the flow of that the same mind which was capable of pro- strikes us, however, that there is a slight inacline and exquisite harmony of the engraver. ducing the dreadful apparition to which we curacy in the drawing of the back of the neck, “May Talbot," engraved by J. C. Edwards, have just adverted, was also capable of pro- and in the manner in which the arm springs from a picture by A. Cooper, R.A., is equally ducing the bewitching model of feminine de- from the shoulder. “ Jealousy," engraved beautiful, although of an entirely opposite cha- licacy, grace, and beauty, which we are now by C. Heath, from a picture by F. P. Stephanoff.

In the print which we have just be noticing?! Well indeed may such an angelic Very fine, although (quite properly) 'not exfore mentioned, all is repose and union ; here, being excite the sudden, ardent, and over-actly so fascinating as “ Love." “ Lucy in all is activity and opposition : it is a little powering passion of which the print is an il- search of her Children," engraved by C. Heath, Wouvermans, and the execution of the plate lustration. In this, as in the last-mentioned from a picture by R. Westall

. Decidedly in is worthy of the design. “ The Temptation plate, Mr. Stephanoff has been nobly seconded Mr. Westall's usual manner ; but full of power on the Mount," engraved by W. R. Smith, by his engraver. Skilful as Mr. Heath has and interest. But we are much surpassing our from a picture by J. Dartin. We lately read long been, we do not believe that he ever before accustomed limits; and must therefore close a list of the travellers who had ascended to the finished any work so deliciously. “Mrs. Peel,” our detailed remarks, and content ourselves summit of Mont Blanc, and certainly, Mr. engraved by C. Heath, from a picture by Sir with saying, generally, that the remaining Martin's name was not in it--a circumstance Thomas Lawrence, P.R.A. They who re- plates, viz. “ The Magic Mirror," engraved by which renders it still mote difficult to account collect Sir Thomas's splendid picture in E. Portbury, from a drawing by J. M. Wright; for the facility with which he spreads before the Exhibition before the last, will be de- “ Anne Page and Slender,” engraved by the eye immense masses, telescopic details, and lighted with this miniature copy of it. C. Rolls, from a drawing by H. Richter ; unlimited space.

“ Harry and his Dog,” en- The beauty of the countenance, the breadth "Scene at Abbotsford,” engraved by C. Westgraved by A. W. Warren, from a picture by of the general effect, and the sparkling bril. wood, from a picture by E. Landseer, A.R.A.; W. F. Witherington—a charming representa- liancy of many of the details, have been —“ Fancy descending among the Muses,” ention of the happiness of rustic childhood. “The imitated with surprising fidelity, sweetness, graved by E. Portbury, from a design by H. Fisherman's Daughter,” engraved by.1. Phelps, and spirit. “ Lake Albano,” engraved by R. | Howard, R.A.; – “ Lucy and her Bird," en. from a picture by R. T. Bone; highly inte- Wallis, from a drawing by J. M. W. Turner, graved by W. Finden, from a drawing by resting. Subjects of this nature are too fre- R.A. A fascinating little landscape. Not-|J. M. Wright ;-and " The Laird's Jock," en. quently debased by excessive vulgarity: Mr. withstanding the experience to which we ad-graved hy C. Heath, from a drawing by H. Cor. Bone is perhaps chargeable with the opposite, verted in the commencement of this notice, we bould, although some of them are possessed of but much more venial, error. “ The Young doubt the possibility of surpassing the exquisite a greater, others of a less degree of merito—are Helvetian,” engraved by W. Ensom, from a transparency and flatness of the distant water, all justly entitled to commendation. The work, picture by J. R. West. Althongh in parts a contrasted as its tender tones are by the firm- taken as a whole, does the highest honour tó little hard and cutting, there is an originality ness and vigour of the figures and accessories English art. in the treatment of this subject which makes it in the foreground. “ The Gleaner," engraved very attractive. “ The Death of Keeldar.” by C. Heath, from a picture by J. Holmes. Alfred in the Neatherd's Cottage. Engraved It is not necessary to be a sportsman to be per. Crabbed, cold blooded, and insensible as critics by James Mitchell, from a picture by D. Wil. fectly sensible of the pathos of this interesting are, or are supposed to be, we think we could kie, R.A. Moon, Boys, and Graves. composition. There are eight other plates in hardly pass the stile against which this de- It is pleasing to see the Muse of history occa. the volume, most of them exceedingly pleasing, lightful little creature is reclining, favith an sionally relax from the general severity of her engraved by Engleheart, Goodyear, Mitchell, evident intention to extend to eyes and hearts deportment, exchange the buskin for the sock, W. Cooke, Edwards, Davenport, Smith, and the designs which she has been so successfully cease to be heroic and classical, and condescend Ensom, from pictures by A. Cooper, R. A., practising on ears,) without, at least, a smile of to be familiar and entertaining. She must have A. E. Chalon, R.A., H. Howard, R.A., F. P. approbation. But we must protest against Mr. been in one of these her gayer moods when she Stephanoff, J. R. West, W. F. Witherington, Holmes's perspective; for it is so managed, that inspired our great painter of domestic life with and H. Corbould.

the distance from the feet of the charmer to the the determination to take a monarch for his

point d'appui of her elbow seems to be about subject, and to represent him, in the picture The Keepsake for 1829.-What a theme for three yards. The print is sweetly engraved. from which this fine print has been engraved, reflection does human talent afford ! How Lago Maggiore,” engraved by W. R. Smith, under circumstances, the contemplation of various,—and, still more, how illimitable ! - from a drawing by J. M. W. Turner, R.A. which mingles mirth at his embarrassment, There have been several of the plates in the Rich and magnificent scenery. The distant with respect for his dignity, and reverence for different forthcoming Annuals which have mountains are full of grandeur. We have fre- his virtue. The moment chosen is that at already passed under our review, that appeared quently lamented that Mr. Turner has such a which Alfred, having been intrusted by the to us, at the time we were looking at them, to penchant for making his clouds rocky. Mr. wife of the neatherd, in whose cottage he had be incapable of being excelled ; and yet-per- Smith has no doubt softened this effect (" to sought shelter in disguise, with the care of some haps some allowance is due to the superior soften rocks!"); but, of course, he could not cakes which are baking at the fire, happens, in strength of the immediate impression made entirely obviate it. “ The Garden of Bocca- a fit of abstraction, to let them burn; and is upon the eye to that which is only left on the cio," engraved by F. Engleheart, from a draw. sharply rated by the good woman for his negli. memory, but-we do really think that two or ing by T. Stothard, R.A. The grace and taste gence. The scolding expression of the housethree of the jewels now lying before us tran- of Mr. Stothard's pencil, in subjects of this de- wife is admirably contrasted by the somewhat scend any thing of the kind that we have be- scription, are too well known to require our disconcerted, somewhat comical, but still royal fore met with. In the very first rank of these eulogium. We are not aware, however, to countenance of the prince, who listens to the is “ The Tapestried Chamber," engraved by what it is attributable,-probably to the too unaccustomed tone of rebuke in a manner J. Goodyear, from a drawing by F. P. Ste- great strength of the middle distance,_but the which strongly reminds us of Kemble in Charles phanoff.' We are quite at a loss to find words figures have somewhat of a Lilliputian appear. the Second, when the blunt sailor suddenly asks for our admiration of this superlative produc- ance. “ Clorinda, or the Necklace of Pearl,” him where he got his watch. Behind is the tion. Whether considered with reference to engraved by C. Heath, from a picture of F. P. neatherd himself. He has just returned from the composition, the expression, or the effect, Stephanoff. A fine and forcible print. We his out-of-door occupations, is steadily gazing it is, in every one and in all of those points of know that a slight diminution of the just pro- at Alfred, and evidently entertains a suspicion view, a most extraordinary work. It renders portion of the head to the figure imparts ele- that “he is not what he seems." A child us exceedingly eager to read the tale that has gance; but is not that principle carried a little kneeling at the hearth, probably apprehensive called forth such powers, and, more especially, too far in the present instance ? " Adelinda," of losing a meal, is, with puffed cheeks, eagerly that has suggested the haggard, ghastly, and engraved by C. Heath, from a drawing by endeavouring to repair the consequences of the appalling midnight visitant, who, once seen, A. E. Chalon, R.A. If any thing could recon- king's heedlessness. In the back-ground is a. will not easily be forgotten. The merits of cile us, either on the boards, on canvass, on girl kneading ; with whom is conversing a Mr. Goodyear in the manner in which he has paper, or any where else, to the assumption of figure, which, besides its other pictorial quali. transferred Mr. Stephanoff's conceptions to male attire by lovely woman, it would be the ties, is rendered highly interesting by its being steel, are beyond all praise. Striking as the exquisite effeminacy, purity, and tenderness, a striking resemblance, en profile, of the painter

int is on the first glance, it must be long and with which Mr. Chalon has here invested his himself. "The furniture of the cottage, and the

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8. Davenport, from a picture by R. Leslie, R.A. | attentively contemplated and examined before subject. " Georgiana, Duchess of Bedford," is one of the sweetest and most affecting little its numerous beauties can be justly appreciated. engraved by C. Heath, from a picture by prints that we have yet seen ; and we are at a “ Love,” engraved by C. Heath, from a pic. E. Landseer, R.A. An elegant and dignified loss which to praise the more the composition ture by F. P. Stephanoff. Who could believe portrait. The head is sweetly beautiful

. It and expression of the painter, or the flow of that the same mind which was capable of pro- strikes us, however, that there is a slight inacline and exquisite harmony of the engraver. ducing the dreadful apparition to which we curacy in the drawing of the back of the neck, “ May Talbot," engraved by J. C. Edwards, have just adverted, was also capable of pro- and in the manner in which the arm springs from a picture by A. Cooper, R.A., is equally ducing the bewitching model of feminine de- from the shoulder. “ Jealousy," engrared beautiful, although of an entirely opposite cha- licacy, grace, and beauty, which we are now by C. Heath, from a picture by F. P. Stephanoff

. In the print which we have just be noticing?! Well indeed may such an angelic Very fine, although (quite properly) not ex. fore mentioned, all is repose and union ; here, being excite the sudden, ardent, and over-actly so fascinating as “ Love." * Lucy in all is activity, and opposition : it is a little powering passion of which the print is an il- search of her Children," engraved by C. Heath, Wouvermans, and the execution of the plate lustration. In this, as in the last-mentioned from a picture by R. Westall

. Decidedly in is worthy of the design. “ The Temptation plate, Mr. Stephanoff has been nobly seconded Mr. Westall's usual manner ; but full of power on the Mount,” engraved by W. R. Smith, by his engraver. Skilful as Mr. Heath has and interest. But we are much surpassing our from a picture by J. Martin. 'We lately read long been, we do not believe that he ever before accustomed limits; and must therefore close a list of the travellers who had ascended to the finished any work so deliciously. “Mrs. Peel," our detailed remarks, and content ourselves summit of Mont Blanc, and certainly Mr. engraved by C. Heath, from a picture by Sir with saying, generally, that the remaining Martin's name was not in it- a circumstance Thomas Lawrence, P.R. A. They whó re- plates, viz. "The Magic Mirror," engraved by which renders it still mote difficult to account collect Sir Thomas's splendid picture in E. Portbury, from a drawing by J. M.Wright; for the facility with which he 'spreads before the Exhibition before the last, will be de- " Anne Page and Slender," engraved by the eye immense masses, telescopic details, and lighted with this miniature copy of it. C. Rolls, from a drawing by H. Richter ;unlimited space.

Harry and his Dog,” en. The beauty of the countenance, the breadth “ Scene at Abbotsford," engraved by C. Westgraved by A. W. Warren, from a picture by of the general effect, and the sparkling bril- wood, from a picture by E. Landseer, A.R.A.; W. F. Witherington-a charming representa- liancy of many of the details, have been —“ Fancy descending among the Muses," en. tion of the happiness of rustic childhood. “ The imitated with surprising fidelity, sweetness, graved by E. Portbury, from a design by H. Fisherman's Daughter,” engraved by.1. Phelps, and spirit. “ Lake Albano," engraved by R. Howard, R.A.; -“ Lucy and her Bird,” en. from a picture by R. T. Bone; highly inte-Wallis, from a drawing by J. M. W. Turner, graved by W. Finden, from a drawing by resting. Subjects of this nature are too fre-R.A. A fascinating little landscape. Not. J. M. Wright ;--and " The Laird's Jock," enquently debased by excessive vulgarity: Mr. withstanding the experience to which we ad-graved by C. Heath, from a drawing by H. Cor. Bone is perhaps chargeable with the opposite, verted in the commencement of this notice, we bould, although some of them are possessed of but much more venial, error. “ The Young doubt the possibility of surpassing the exquisite a greater, others of a less degree of rit,re Helvetian,” engraved by W. Ensom, from a transparency and flatness of the distant water, all justly entitled to commendation. The work, picture by J. R. West. Although in parts a contrasted as its tender tones are by the firm- taken as a whole, does the highest honour to little hard and cutting, there is an originality ness and vigour of the figures and accessories English art. in the treatment of this subject which makes it in the foreground. “ The Gleaner," engraved very attractive. The Death of Keeldar.” by C. Heath, from a picture by J. Holmes. Alfred in the Neatherd's Cottage. Engraved It is not necessary to be a sportsman to be per. Crabbed, cold blooded, and insensible as critics by James Mitchell, from a picture by D. Wil

. fectly sensible of the pathos of this interesting are, or are supposed to be, we think we could kie, R.A. Moon, Boys, and Graves. composition. There are eight other plates in hardly pass the stile against which this de- It is pleasing to see the Muse of history occathe volume, most of them exceedingly pleasing, lightful little creature is reclining, ftvith an sionally relax from the general severity of her engraved by Engleheart, Goodyear, Mitchell , evident intention to extend to eyes and hearts deportment, exchange the buskin for the sock

, W. Cooke, Edwards, Davenport, Smith, and the designs which she has been so successfully cease to be heroic and classical, and condescend Ensom, from pictures by A. Cooper, R.A., practising on ears,) without, at least, a smile of to be familiar and entertaining. She must have A. E. Chalon, R.A., H. Howard, R.A., F. P. approbation. But we must protest against Mr. been in one of these her gayer moods when she Stephanoff, J. R. West, W. F. Witherington, Holmes's perspective ; for it is so managed, that inspired our great painter of domestic life with and H. Corbould.

the distance from the feet of the charmer to the the determination to take a monarch for his

point d'appui of her elbow seems to be about subject, and to represent him, in the picture The Keepsake for 1829.—What a theme for three yards. The print is sweetly engraved. from which this fine print has been engraved

, reflection does human talent afford ! How " Lago Maggiore," engraved by W. R. Smith, under circumstances, the contemplation of various,—and, still more, how illimitable - from a drawing by J. M. W. Turner, R.A. which mingles mirth at his embarrassment

, There have been several of the plates in the Rich and magnificent scenery. The distant with respect for his dignity, and reverence for different forthcoming Annuals which have mountains are full of grandeur. We have fre- his virtue. The moment chosen is that at already passed under our review, that appeared quently lamented that Mr. Turner has such a which Alfred, having been intrusted by the to us, at the time we were looking at them, to penchant for making his clouds rocky. Mr. wife of the neatherd, in whose cottage he had be incapable of being excelled ; and yet—per-Smith has no doubt softened this effect (" to sought shelter in disguise, with the care of some haps some allowance is due to the superior soften rocks!"); but, of course, he could not cakes which are baking at the fire

, happens

, in strength of the immediate impression made entirely obviate it. " The Garden of Bocca- ja fit of abstraction, to let them burn; and is upon the eye to that which is only left on the cio, engraved by F. Engleheart, from a drawv. sharply rated by the good woman for his neglimemory, but--we do really think that two or ing by T. Stothard, R.A. The grace and taste gence. The scolding expression of the house. three of the jewels now lying before us tran- of Mr. Stothard's pencil, in subjects of this

de- wife is admirably contrasted by the somewhat fore met with. In the very first rank of these eulogium. We are not aware, however, to countenance of the prince, who listens to the scend any thing of the kind that we have be-scription, are too well known to require our disconcerted, somewhat comical, but still royal is “ The Tapestried Chamber," engraved by what it is attributable,-probably to the too unaccustomed tone of rebuke in a manner J. Goodyear, from a drawing by F. P. Ste- great strength of the middle distance, but the which strongly reminds us of Kemble in Charles phanoff. We are quite at a loss to find words figures have somewhat of a Lilliputian appear-the Second, when the blunt sailor suddenly asks for our admiration of this superlative produc- ance. “ Clorinda, or the Necklace of Pearl," him where he got his watch. Behind is the tion. Whether considered with reference to engraved by C. Heath, from a picture of F. Þ. neatherd himself. He has just returned from the composition, the expression, or the effect, Stephanoff. A fine and forcible print. We his out-of-door occupations, is steadily gazing it is, in every one and in all of those points of know that a slight diminution of the just pro- at Alfred, and evidently entertains a suspicion us exceedingly eager to read the tale that has gance ; but is not that principle carried a little kneeling at the hearth, probably apprehensive called forth such powers, and, more especially, too far in the present instance ? * Adelinda," of losing a meal, is, with puffed cheeks, egrering that has suggested the haggard, ghastly, and engraved by C. Heath, from a drawing by endeavouring to repair the consequences of the appalling midnight visitant, who, once seen, A. E. Chalon, R.A. If'any thing could recon king's heedlessness. In the back-ground is a Mr. Goodyear in the manner in which he has paper, or any where else, to the assumption of ligure,

which, besides its other pictorial quali transferred Mr. Stephanoff's conceptions to male attire by lovely woman, it would be the lies, is rendered highly interesting

by its belong Steel, are beyond all praise

. Striking as the exquisite effeminacy, purity, and tenderness, a striking resemblance, en profile, of the painter print is on the first glance, it must be long and with which Mr. Chalon has" here invested his l'himsele. The furniture of the cottage, and the

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