Imatges de pÓgina
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take possession of Scutari, a large and magnifi- On the peculiar merits of this composition The pantomime opens with some pretty fairy cent suburb, if it may be so called, of Constan- we cannot at present dwell; but a song in it, verses. The scene is a waterfall, across which tinople, situated on the Asiatic coast, imme. which seems to have suggested to Lord Byron is seen a rainbow. Puck invokes “fair Lady

spray

shower" dwell, diately opposite the Seraglio: built in the form the idea of one of his most admired Hebrew Foam-bell” from her of an 'amphitheatre, surrounded by heights, the Melodies, struck us as not being contempti- ing; and then informs her ladyship, that their approach to which is open, running out into a ble :

queen has determined to hold a court of moon. narrow point, completely commanded the mo- “ The Moon-man came down like a cheesemonger bold, light revelry at Glendalough, whose And his red gills were glowing with purple and gold,

« Ruin'd walls and round tower gray ment it is invested, unprovided with walls, And the warts on his nose were such warts as might be

Shall wonder at beings so bright and gay." and, from its vast extent, not easily encom.

When the blue-ruin roll'd down his throat like a sea. passed with a solid rampart, it would present Like the leaves of a cabbage, a cabbage that's red"-

Foam-bell, in reply, hints that the spot has an easy conquest, notwithstanding its 70,000 and so on--for we unfortunately forget the been incautiously

chosen ; and informs Puck, inhabitants, of whom the greater part are true

that her fairy companion, Rose-dew, had obbelievers. The Russian flag would soon be

The pantomime of which we have not the served a tipsy party in the valley, one of seen waving over the towers or the ruins of poetry-or as Mr. Croker modestly calls it,

whom

" A drunken dog, Scutari, and Constantinople would tremble."

“the rhymes”_before us, was, a year or two Constantinople itself is considered as inca- since, execrably performed at the Adelphi, and

By far the drunkenest fellow in the parish," pable of formidable resistance. We need not met with but indifferent success-a conclusion went staggering towards the spot appointed for follow the author farther. He speaks of a which might have been easily predicted. That

their meeting. This drunken dog proves to be military colonisation of Asia Minor ; of taking was evidently not the house for experiments of

no other than Daniel O'Rourke. possession of Smyrna as the base of ulterior this kind; but let them be tried at either of

Puck answers the fears of Lady Foam-bell operations ; and, finally, of driving the Turks the great theatres, and we shall see reputation

with

“ Poh! never mind, he'll flounder in the marish; to their original native country the banks of in the result. But we must return from these Thence, whole and bog-dried, he, my jolly fairies, the Euphrates and Tigris.

speculations to the pleasant little work before Will be fish'd up, this time some hundred years, What may be contemplated by all or any of

To set your musty chemists by the ears, us, which has been reprinted uniformly with

And puzzle all your humdrum antiquaries !
the Powers of Europe, it is not for us to guess; the Irish Fairy Legends.

That piece of whisky-steeped earth
but we presume that the idea of a war to this
Mr. Croker prefaces his work with an agree-

Shall not, I warrant, mar our mirth !"
extent has hardly, as yet, been entertained. able history of the story of Daniel O'Rourke, Dan, in the next scene, makes his appearance
It is

, nevertheless, important at this moment which, however, is not satisfactory to us. We in a state of glorious civilation.
to look at such plans as Baron Von Valentini doubt if any legend could in so short a space of "Enter Daniel O'Rourke, with bottle in his hand, singing.
proposes, and to such results as he argues upon time as half a century, become so widely dif-

Air-The Last Rose of Summer.
as possible and probable : and we have only fused as that of Daniel O'Rourke. Mr. Croker,

"Tis the last sup of whisky
done our duty in reporting them as intelligibly previous to his account of its origin, offers the
as we could, for the consideration of the British following remarks:

All the rest of the bottle

Is cleaned out and gone-(pauses).
nation ;-at all events, there is much informa-
“ That a very intimate acquaintance with

I'll not leave thee, thou lone drop!
tion to be gathered from the work itself.

'Twould be mighty unkind,
both the literature and music of Italy was cul-
tivated from the beginning to nearly the close

To leave thee behind-drinks).

Dan. By all that's bad, l'ın thinking
Daniel O'Rourke ; 109, Rhymes of a Panto- of the last century in Ireland, is sufficiently

That I've been drinking;
mize, founded on that Story. By T. Crofton proved by the Memoirs of Lord Charlemont,

For all the ground
Croker, Esq. 1828. Ainsworth.
the works of Mr. Walker, &c.; and it may

Is turning round,

And every star is winking!
The story of Daniel O'Rourke we have ever not be saying too much to add, that the Italian

And then what's this ?--I thought that I most truly shooked upon as an admirable qne for a panto- language was at that period more familiarly

Knew every inch of sod round Ballyhooly; mime. It has every capability; and, properly known, and, consequently, the works of Italian

But now I find that-an unlucky dog! produced, would, we doubt not, exceed in at writers were more the subject of ordinary con.

I've lost myself in this unruly bog,

And cannot jog
traction that most popular of these exhibitions, versation, among a certain circle in Dublin,

A single step-but stick just like a log,
Mother Goose. During our Christmas visits than they ever have been among any corre-

O Hulla-Hulla-goane!

Bad luck to you, above all bogs that ever yet were to the great theatres

, on the appearance of har- sponding circle in London. When this is kept
equia and his motley associates, we always in mind, Daniel O'Rourke, who on his eagle

But grief's no good-I'll sit upon this stone.
feel inclined to ask, with Mr. D’Israeli, “ Why
sits

(Sings) Good liquor-good liquor
is this burlesque race here privileged to cost so

Makes the heart to beat quicker,
As Sir Astolpho on his Hippogriff,"

And the blood to flow thicker,
much, to do so little, and to repeat that little
so often ?" The following is, we believe, a parody on Ariosto. My friend, Mr. Prior, in
may appear to be only a free and jocular Irish

Good liquor, good liquor,

From black jack of leather, correct estimate of the expenses of " getting the second edition of his Life of Burke, has at

Cow-horn, cup, or mether, up" the Christmas pantomimes this year:

Let good men drink together tributed—I know not on what authority the

Their liquor, their liquor,
invention of Daniel O'Rourke to a Mr. Doyle,
Drury Lane

Though foot and tongue falter,
Surrey
a surgeon, who moved in the very pleasant

Poh! why should I palter ?
Adelphi

and intellectual society of Dublin some seventy
Olyropic:

No liquor, no liquor ! years since. Whether he was the author or

They who leave it behind 'em, not, can now only be matter for conjecture ; but

A rope's end may find 'em ;

So P'll drink, and not mind 'em,
£3050
there is a traditionary story of his introduction

My liquor, my liquor.
And yet what does this enormous sum annually specimen of an Irish peasant, which supports
to Quin, who had expressed a wish to see a

(Sits, and lifts the bottle to his lips.) produce ? The same tricks and the same jokes Mr. Prior's assertion,

My bottle's out-the times are rather odd, mutat , stale, and unprofitable. To our mind,

Doyle, dressed in the The moon is reeling, and the mountains nod!

(Sings himself to sleep.)" Daniel O'Rourke, roaring and rioting in his assumed, was brought in to a merry party, proper costume of the character which he had

The fairies now appear, and commence an rick and racy Irish humour

, is a superb charac- where Quin, in the full tide of humour, reigned indignant search for the wretch who has polter for pantomime. His adventures are wild

paramount, according to his custom. The luted their mystic circle. Dan is discovered, and wonderful in the extreme :-now soaring mock rustic acted his part with becoming awk- and is only saved from the torments which are

eagle back.m-now parleying with the Man wardness; but bandied jest for jest with the debated, by the friendship of a jolly and conge. of the Moon himself”-now having a little hnge leviathan. You're a droll fellow, my nial sprite, Master Cluricaune, who manifests familiar gossip with a fock of geese ;--in short, man,' at last said Quin- you remind me of a his good - fellowship by undertaking to lead his whole journey to and from the moon is gaite suicient to form a most whimsical intro story once beard;' and Quin told it accord, Dan a dance which he will long remember, duction, without additional embellishment.

ingly, to the delight of the company. “ Well and une Moon, too, has ever been a truly fertile then,' said Doyle, your honour reminds me of

Such an impression upon his brain," peler for pantomimic fancies. Indeed, we brought about, is not related ; but Doyle told that he will never

wander more within the hal. another, remember an excellent pantomime founded on the story of Daniel O'Rourke, which was re

lowed precincts of a fairy ring, To this pro. the cursery legend which concludes with

ceived with shouts of laughter and it is need. position the queen assents "The Man in the Moon

“ Do as you will,
less to say the deception was not carried on

We trip to the hill,
To ask his way to Norwich."
much longer,"

Where the moon is bright, and the winds are stil;

to the

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One Hundred Fables, Original and Selected. assaulted him. A grave old fox who heard him, lost no opportunity of obtaining private con

imagine who they were that had thus cruelly (tors for court favour. With this intent he By James Northcote, R.A., &c. &c. Em. bellished with Two Hundred and Eighty who they were who had so roughly treated him, busy to inform him of what, he said, he had

replied, that as he declared he could not conceive ferences with the lion, and on all occasions was Engravings on Wood. 12mo. pp. 272. Lon. he must of necessity be liable to one of these heard against his character and disposition, don, 1828. G. Lawford.

two odious accusations, either of which would from those whom the lion bad taken to be his ALTHOUGH, from their invention by Æsop, be sufficient to exclude him from being an ob- best friends saying, the fox had accused him or rather by Hesiod, fables have been, at ject of pity: that of having offended so many of tyranny--the horse had complained he was times and in all countries, a favourite mode of as to be confounded by the number of his ene-blood-thirsty- the bull that he was selfish and communicating instruction to the young, we mies, or that of forgetting those to whom he cruel and the stag, that he knew not what confess that we have frequently had our had done injuries worthy of resentment.--Ap- mercy was. At length the lion, no longer able doubts with regard to their beneficial tendency plication. We too often meet with men who to suffer this artful and malignant harangue, in that respect. The very fiction on which very much resemble the fox in this fable, who, furiously replied : “ Thinkest thou, base and they are founded, the ascribing to beasts, and from a violent partiality to themselves and their pitiful traítor, thus to abuse me to my face, in birds, and reptiles, not merely human speech, own interests, can with great facility gloss over attributing all those crimes to me; and that but human passions and human reason is cal. their meanest actions, which are soon dismissed thou canst escape my vengeance by saying ·culated to confound and mislead the infant from their memories, leaving no more impres, they are the remarks of my good and faithful mind; incapable as it must be of distinguishing sion than if they had been written on the sur- subjects ? No, foolish animal, take thy death between what is required in narratives of fact, face of the water ; whilst, on the contrary, the forthy officious pains, and thus become of and what is permitted in creations of fancy slightest injuries done them, fix in their minds some use to others by the terror of thy exam. Add to this, that the moral of a fable is not like inscriptions written with a pen of iron on ple.' So saying, he instantly crushed bim to always sound; and that the morals of different a rock. But our actions in our own view are pieces. Application. There are some artful fables are frequently contradictory. - In the like the last syllables of words, which every gossips, who take a malicious delight in tor case of " children of a larger growth,” how- man makes rhyme to what he thinks fit." menting their intimates, by relating every idle ever, these objections (at least some of them) The vain Glow-Worm.-A certain glow- rumour which they have heard against them; are not equally applicable ; and a brief and worm had long been the object of admiration and, under a pretence of pure friendship, acforcible apologue may frequently convey a les amongst his humble acquaintance, the insects companied with the pride of offering good son more effectively than any grave and elabo- of the hedge where he made a figure; and advice, conclude they shall escape the odium rate didactic composition; and with a much every night would condescend to illumine them of giving pain, which they deserve to incur : better chance of being remembered.

with the splendour of his light, and in return but the triumphs of those petty tyrants, notMr. Northcote observes, that his chief induce- received the homage of his reptile court with withstanding all their art, turn out at last to ment in making the present collection was the a most gracions air of affected condescension. their own hurt ; for their visits are soon found amusement and employment it afforded him, in On one occasion a small-waisted flatterer ob- to forbode our vexation, and at length we shun the way of his profession as a painter, in truded himself on his notice, by observing, them as we shun disease. Those who blow the sketching designs for each fable. Many of these that his humility was wonderful, and advised coals of others' strife, may chance to have the designs are highly ingenions, and possess great him by all means to make himself more public, sparks fly in their own face.” merit. They are engraved on wood by some of and to shine in a more exalted circle, that the “ The Congregation of Pious Animals. our best artists in that line; and are, generally great world might become the witnesses of such Once upon a time it is said that an extraor. speaking, executed with much skill. If, oc- attractions!' * No, no,' replied the grovelling- dinary fit of piety influenced the animal create casionally, there may appear in them a little spirited glow-worm, that is not to my taste; tion to offer up their grateful acknowledgments want of clearness, a little adhesion of one part for, between ourselves, my great delight is to to Jupiter for the various gifts and endow. to another, it is most likely that these deficiencies be in company where I can preside, and be re- ments he had bestowed upon them; and when are attributable to the impracticability, even garded as a wonder no matter though it be assembled, some of the most forward of them, with the utmost care and attention, of giving from their inferiority or ignorance. Whereas, with much seeming humility and thankfulness, to the impressions from blocks when printed if I associate with those of higher endowments, professed the deepest sense of the peculiar in the page with type, the same beauty which I shall feel my pride mortified, and appear, happy talents and dispositions with which they.. they exhibit when printed by themselves. The even to myself, to be no better than a poor vainly thought they were blessed. The penati ornamental letter at the beginning, and the worm.'---Application. There are certain dis- cock returned thanks for the exquisite sweetvignette at the end of every fable, are the in- positions of the mind that incline men to a base ness of his voice--the hog for his love of cleanvention of Mr. William Harvey, whom Mr. and vulgar ambition, a desire of shining at any liness--the viper for his harmless disposition Northcote justly calls “ one of the most dis-rate ; and therefore they seek out for such com- the cuckoo for the pleasing variety of his mu. tinguished artists in his profession.” Most of panions only, as are confessedly their inferiors, sical notes and the goose for the gracefulnes: them are admirable; and the adaptation of the where no improvement can be gained, where of her carriage ; and so on. Jupiter acceptec vignettes to the respective fables which precede Hattery and admiration are received by them this commendable act of duty, in return for them, is in many instances singularly happy with pleasure, although offered by the meanest real blessings that they undonbtedly did enjoy Mr. Harvey also, it seems, made the drawings of mortals ; and preferred before the counsel but at the same time informed them, that thei on the wood, from Mr. Northcote's designs, for of the wise, or the admonition of the good. But being so very particular as to specify those en the prints at the head of every fable. such egotists must ever remain in all their dowments was quite unnecessary, as the par

Of the Fables themselves, some are derived errors. Instruetion gives them pain, because ticular gifts which each of them had to boas from foreign sources ; but the greater number it lessens their self-importance ; nor can they of, were best known to himself, who gav. are of Mr. Northcote's own invention. Mr. bear the shock of feeling themselves surpassed, them. -- Application. It frequently happent Northcote evinces in them considerable sa- and from that mean motive shun such oppor- that nature, in her freaks, makes men so per gacity and discrimination ; although some- tunities as might render them fit for the highest verse, as to pride themselves highly in think times, perhaps, the view which he takes of society; for he who would become a master, ing they possess those talents (in) which ever human nature may be liable to the imputation must first submit to the humble station of a one else can see they are deficient. Even i of being rather cynical. The following extracts pupil. None are so empty as those who are full our acts of piety, we ought to be well aware will shew that his diction is generally perspi. of themselves."

vanity and self-opinion, and not arrogant, cuous and unaffected; though we must except “ The Lion and the Ape.-An old lion had imagine that we have greater claims to Heaven the beginning of the fable of the Lion and the long been despotic sovereign of the forest, and promised favour than many of our neighbou Ape, which is the very reverse.

of course accustomed to the abject homage of notwithstanding the appearance of things "'The Hunted Fox.-An active young fox, every inferior animal in it, as is common in our own partial and Aattering perception.' who was exceedingly notorious for his depreda- courts, each trying to out-do his companions in tions on the poultry in his neighbourhood, was servility ;-when a pert malicious ape, who

Bishop Heber's Journal. once discovered in the fact, and so closely pur- wished to give his powerful master some pain, sued by the enraged peasants, whose property and yet escape his rage, as he well knew it was It is not our wont, amidst the multiplicity he had invaded, that he did not escape without as much as his life was worth to offend him publications on subjects which continually several severe blows and wounds, of which he openly, therefore sought how he might artfully up and claim our attention, to drug our teache made grievous complaint and great outcry when mortify him under the mask of friendship, but even with the best things. But, do what he arrived among his companions, declaring, at keep out of the scrape himself, and at the same may, we can only indicate, certainly neith the same time, that he neither knew nor could time insidiously cause the ruin of his competi-Villustrate nor discuss, the great beauties

(Second Notice.)

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visited some islands in the centre of Tampico | leaning over a little wicket which kept the with a greasy pack of cards, and anxiously
Lake, at about seven miles' distance from pigs, dogs, cats, and poultry, from coming out stake their respective stocks of paper cigars,
Pueblo Viejo. On rounding the first small of the yard into my room. While we cosily until one or the other became bankrupt.”
woody islet, we glided from the effects of a fresh smoked the cigars with which she favoured me, But, indeed, in many other respects the
* norte' or norther, which was blowing, into a I drew in lessons of Spanish, by conversing Mexicans are a remarkable and blinded people.
smooth sheltered pool thickly overhung with with her, and listening to constantly repeated Farther up the country, we have the following
mangrove and other trees, on which were sit assurances that she was an • old Spaniard' details on various points which illustrate their
ting hundreds of cranes, egrets, rose-coloured and a woman of sense, although, in common manners, feelings, and state of ignorance in
spoonbills, brown and blue herons, and various with nearly all the native ladies of the place, respect to the most important circumstances
other birds, all as thickly crowded as the she did not possess the accomplishments of which occupy mankind. Of their medical, re-
tenants of our English rookeries. In shooting reading and writing.

ligious, and legal qualifications, three short
our specimens, we alarmed two very large al. “ At the new town of Las Tamaulipas (about extracts will speak volumes : we must confess
ligators, which could not reach the lake but by three miles to the northward of Pueblo Viejo, they seem to be equally astute with these three
walking along' an extensive sand-bank ; and and in a different state), I experienced great learned professions.
we were thus enabled to observe them in their difficulties with the custom-house officers, who 1. At San Luis Potosi, a physician" was called
clumsy progress, which can very rarely be the would do nothing towards clearing the vessel. to the assistance of a poor labourer with a rup-
case, as they are usually found lying so close Their only working hours at any time were tured blood-vessel. ice was the only remedy
to the water's edge, that they reach it by from 9 A. M. to 1 P. M., after which period no known to stop the flow of blood, and none
one spring. From the small island, on which entreaties could induce them to move. Even could be obtained until a priest should be sent
we procured many hatsful of eggs, we pro- in the very small portion of the day set apart for to confess the sufferer before he died. What
ceeded to another, on the north side of which for business, if a cock-fight was to be held, if then was to be done?-jt was but too certain
were innumerable nests of cranes and the ro- gambling engaged them, or if they were lazy, that the man would soon expire, unless means
seate spoonbill, each containing two or three duty was very quietly deferred until the mor- were found to arrest the effusion. The physi.
nearly fledged young ones. The mangroves row, when in all probability the same excuse cian therefore had no resource but to sew up
are so closely woven together at this place, would be again offered ; and as in this land of the poor wretch's mouth and nostrils; but
that there is little difficulty in climbing amongst liberty and equality, scolding these people would even before the host could be sent for, the
them, and even walking on their tops. We only make them worse, patience is the best miserable creature was, very naturally, sutfo-
consequently scrambled about to admire the policy, and is one of the greatest blessings cated." ;
pink clusters of little spoonbills and the pure which a traveller in the republic of Mexico 2. In the church of San Francisco, in the same
white down of the young cranes, all as large as can possess.”

enlightened placem" on the walls were hung a barn-door fowls, and offering the most beau- Having sent to the Real del Monte his charge, series of pictures descriptive of the life and tiful contrast imaginable to the deep shining of whom he seems to have been tolerably tired* actions of San Francisco. The saint is hungry, green of the leaves amongst which they were (having, perhaps, more of the Captain R.N. than and our Saviour is seen sitting at table with sheltered. Having completed our collection, of the Agent Mining Co. in his sensible compo- and helping him to the viands, while an angel we returned home, and I carried with me a sition), our unburdened author proceeded up brings him water to quench his thirst. He is couple of young spoonbills, which soon grew so the river to Tampico aad Tanjuco, &c., as we represented, after his death, as sitting on the tame as to come at my call and follow me have before stated. At the former, he visited left hand of the Almighty, who is pictured as wherever I chose : but these beautiful crea- a gambling-table, where Francesca, his land- an aged man, having on his right the Redeemer tures died when put on ship-board for a pass- lady, - a person of such respectability, that she and the Virgin Mary. Some of the supposed age to England?”

walked to it in great state, with the author and miracles and conferences with the Divinity are But before we go on with these picturesque a friend on each side, and,“ preceded by her beyond all description blasphemous; and the descriptions, we have to notice the reception three servant-maids, one of whom was in her friars informed me,-at the same time triummet with by our countrymen. At Pueblo, Indian dress, and had charge of the cigars for phantly pointing to a painting of the event " the commandant (we quote Captain Li's her mistress, -was soon in full play, " having that the saint had procured from God's own naire remarks) obligingly assured me that elbowed some ragged women off the only bench mouth the entire pardon of the sins of the every thing he had was at my disposal ;' the in the place.” Here, “ fine ladies with mock world, as fully as was granted to Christ him. alcalde begged me to believe that he was my jewels

, and women of all shades and colours, self; but that the Pope of the age in which ferant ;' and the chief of the customs having with every variety of men, crowded thickly San Francisco lived, would not confirm the kissed my hand, and entreated that I would round their favourite game; and my landladý grant, and that mankind in consequence had by my commands on him," then proceeded having succeeded in getting the balls into her been left in their blindness and sin !"** W throw some impediments in my way. own hands, became entirely occupied in throw- Our legal example must be from Zacatecas. Mr. Robertson very kindly hired a windowlessing them with such gestures or turns of the 3. “ Business obliged me to ride to the city on com for me in one of the most respectable arm as in her opinion would insure success. this day, to demand justice against a defaulter horses in the place

, the mistress of which was Before leaving the Plaza, where Francesca re- to the Company; and when the offender had better known by the name of the Gachupina mained playing until nearly daylight, I made confessed himself a rogue, and bound himself to 14 term of reproach applied to European Spa- my way through the crowd to take a last peep pay over the large suin of which he had robbed piards) than by her proper appellation of Doña at her; and saw a fellow to whom I had paid us,the judge, thief, plaintiff

, and master of Francesca. This lady, who had the reputation a real in the morning for sweeping before my the house where the affair was canvassed, with de being rich and cleanly, was quite distressed door, and who was almost in rags, standing some friends of the parties, sat down very in not having time to whiten my room ; but opposite my fair friend, acting

as banker to the quietly and socially to dinner together!" two Indian girls were instantly set to work to table, at which I suppose he had been success- Here, for the present, we must conclude; but wash the earthen door and make me comfort- ful. He had squeezed a real into his ear para we shall with great pleasure return to our oleh My landlady was all politeness, and i fortuna, and ventured his dollars at every analysis of this most agreeable publication. clearly saw that she entertained no mean opi- turn with the most perfect sang froid. The sien of her own good breeding and address . I apparent indifference to losses, and apathy when

Marriot; she was generally allowed to be one of the successful, is very remarkable with all classes the event affords another illustration of Medicani etja and

: . host respectable ladies of Tampico ; and al- of Mexicans : but they gamble so incessantly, poor Marriot I lost an invaluable servant and friend, who in

had as well as taking care of her shop and her fair self, was dangerous

passion must be deadened, and that the most gloomy days of my existence and the serices by no means her husband, she' piqued herself the love of play at last becomes a disorder on which we had been engaged together equallye a ser cicero ens ber irreproachable character, and the high rather than an amusement. I have frequently

In this land of bigotry the

poor fellow been a grave, had I , estimation in which she was held on account of seen a couple of poor porters, who had not a When he was dead, sent for a priest, who, ho weder

not; her wealth. Her age might have been about farthing of money, sit gravely'down in the dust arriving,

turned unreclingly to me

, ex claiming forts-five; her person was fat; and when in

he has died without confession-his soul is lost, and it will been shut up for two months with a set of ricehanies who a priest was sufficient declaration

thathine de called in those (he have be for to dit tied round the waist with cansizing, and became the themselves too good to be constranica

, Catholic; and by the kind assistance of Mr. Dall, I found pericularly attractive. This charming person woara a vessel and the want of occupation, from their evening, slune A), Nr. Dail and two other Americanınday digas in her mouth, her whole figure was , .

at all enter into my feelings on this occasion. Indeed, no difficulty in having him interred in the Campo Santo and formed an interesting picture every superintendencei these people as attended with much I saw my poor departed servant burică"wich proper and

usual habits of life, it is to be expected carrying candles; morning at about six o'clock, as she stood trouble."

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One Hundred Fables, Original and Selected. imagine who they were that had thus crnelly (tors for court favour. With this intent he

assaulted him. A grave old fox who heard him, lost no opportunity of obtaining private conBy James Northcote, R.A., &c. &c. Em. replied, that as he declared he could not conceive ferences with the lion, and on all occasions was bellished with Two Hundred and Eighty who they were who had so roughly treated him, busy to inform him of what, he said, he had Engravings on Wood. 12mo. pp. 272. Ion he must of necessity

be liable to one of these heard against his character and disposition, don, 1828. G. Lawford.

two odious accusations, either of which would from those whom the lion had taken to be his ALTHOUGH, from their invention by Æsop, be sufficient to exclude him from being an ob- best friends saying, the fox had accused him or rather by Hesiod, fables have been, at all ject of pity: that of having offended so many of tyranny--the horse had complained he was times and in all coantries, a favourite mode of as to be confounded by the number of his ene- blood-thirsty--the bull that he was selfish and communicating instruction to the young, we mies, or that of forgetting those to whom he cruel_and the stag, that he knew not what confess that we have frequently had our had done injuries worthy of resentment.--Ap- mercy was. At length the lion, no longer able doubts with regard to their beneficial tendency plication. We too often meet with men who to suffer this artful and malignant harangue, in that respect. The very fiction on which very much resemble the fox in this fable, who, furiously replied: • Thinkest thou, base and they are founded,—the ascribing to beasts, and from a violent partiality to themselves and their pitiful traitor, thus to abuse me to my face, in birds, and reptiles, not merely human speech, own interests, can with great facility gloss over attributing all those crimes to me; and that but human passions and human reason, is cal- their meanest actions, which are soon dismissed thou canst escape my vengeance by saying culated to confound and mislead the infant from their memories, leaving no more impres- they are the remarks of my good and faithful mind; incapable as it must be of distinguishing sion than if they had been written on the sur- subjects ? No, foolish animal, take thy death between what is required in narratives of fact, face of the water ; whilst, on the contrary, the forthy officious pains, and thus become of and what is permitted in creations of fancy slightest injuries done them, fix in their minds some use to others by the terror of thy exam. Add to this, that the moral of a fable is not like inscriptions written with a pen of iron on ple.' So saying, he instantly crushed him to always sound; and that the morals of different a rock. But our actions in our own view are pieces. Applicntion. There are some artful fables are frequently contradictory. In the like the last syllables of words, which every gossips, who take a malicious delight in torcase of " children of a larger growth,” how- man makes rhyme to what he thinks fit." menting their intimates, by relating every idle ever, these objections (at least some of them) " The vain Glow-Worm. A certain glow. rumour which they have heard against them ; are not equally applicable ; and a brief and worm had long been the object of admiration and, under a pretence of pure friendship, acforcible apologue may frequently convey a les amongst his humble acquaintance, the insects companied with the pride of offering good son more effectively than any grave and elabo- of the hedge where he made a figure; and advice, conclude they shall escape the odium rate didactic composition; and with a much every night would condescend to illumine them of giving pain, which they deserve to incur : better chance of being remembered.

with the splendour of his light, and in return but the triumphs of those petty tyrants, not. Mr. Northcote observes, that his chief induce- received the homage of his reptile court with withstanding all their art, turn out at last to ment in making the present collection was the a most gracious air of affected condescension. their own hurt ; for their visits are soon found amusement and employment it afforded him, in On one occasion a small-waisted Matterer ob- to forbode our vexation, and at length we shun the way of his profession as a painter, in truded himself on his notice, by observing, them as we shun disease. Those who blow the sketching designs for each fable.. Many of these that his humility was wonderful, and advised coals of others' strife, may chance to have the designs are highly ingenious, and possess great him by all means to make himself more public, sparks fly in their own face." merit. They are engraved on wood by some of and to shine in a more exalted circle, that the “ The Congregation of Pious animals. our best artists in that line; and are, generally great world might become the witnesses of such Once upon a time it is said that an extraorspeaking, executed with much skill. If, oc- attractions!' No, no,' replied the grovelling- dinary fit of piety, influenced the animal creacasionally, there may appear in them a little spirited glow-worm, that is not to my taste; tion to offer up their grateful acknowledgments want of clearness, a little adhesion of one part for, between ourselves, my great delight is to to Jupiter for the various gifts and endow. to another, it is most likely that these deficiencies be in company where I can preside, and be re- ments he had bestowed upon them; and when are attributable to the impracticability, even garded as a wonder-no matter though it be assembled, some of the most forward of them, with the utmost care and attention, of giving from their inferiority or ignorance. Whereas, with much seeming humility and thankfulness. to the impressions from blocks when printed if I associate with those of higher endowments, professed the deepest sense of the peculiar'. in the page with type, the same beauty which I shall feel my pride mortified, and appear, happy talents and dispositions with which they they exhibit when printed by themselves. The even to myself, to be no better than a poor vainly thought they were blessed. The pesi ornamental letter at the beginning, and the worm.'-Application. There are certain dis. cock returned thanks for the exquisite sweet vignette at the end of every fable, are the in- positions of the mind that incline men to a base ness of his voice the hog for his love of clean vention of Mr. William Harvey, whom Mr. and vulgar ambition, a desire of shining at any liness-the riper for his harmless disposition: Northcote justly calls“ one of the most dis- rate ; and therefore they seek out for such com- the cuckoo for the pleasing variety of his mus tinguished artists in his profession.”. Most of panions only, as are confessedly their inferiors, sical notes and the goose for the gracefulner them are admirable; and the adaptation of the where no improvement can be gained, where of her carriage ; and so on. Jupiter accepte vignettes to the respective fables which precede Aattery and admiration are received by them this commendable act of duty, in return to them, is in many instances singularly happy. with pleasure, although offered by the meanest real blessings that they undoabtedly did enjoy Mr. Harvey also, it seems, made the drawings of mortals ; and preferred before the counsel but at the same time informed them, that the on the wood, from Mr. Northcote's designs, for of the wise, or the admonition of the good. But being so very particular as to specify those er the prints at the head of every fable. such egotists must ever remain in all their dowments was quite unnecessary, as the pa

Of the Fables themselves, some are derived errors. Instruction gives them pain, because ticular gifts which each of them had to boa from foreign sources ; but the greater number it lessens their self-importance ; nor can they of, were best known to himself, who ga are of Mr. Northcote's own invention. Mr. bear the shock of feeling themselves surpassed, them. Application. It frequently happer Northcote evinees in them considerable sa- and from that mean motive shun such oppor- that nature, in her freaks, makes men so pe gacity and discrimination; although some- tunities as might render them fit for the highest verse, as to pride themselves highly in thin times, perhaps, the view which he takes of society; for he who would become a master, ing they possess those talents (in) which eve human nature may be liable to the imputation must first submit to the humble station of a one else can see they are deficient. of being rather cynical. The following extracts pupil. None are so empty as those who are full our acts of piety, we ought to be well aware will shew that his diction is generally perspi- of themselves."

vanity and self-opinion, and not arrogan cuous and unaffected; though we must except The Lion and the Ape.-An old lion had imagine that we have greater claims to Heave the beginning of the fable of the Lion and the long been despotic sovereign of the forest, and promised favour than many of our neighbor Ape, which is the very reverse.

of course accustomed to the abject homage of notwithstanding the appearance of things ** The Hunted Fox.-An active young fox, every inferior animal in it, as is common in our own partial and flattering perception. who was exceedingly notorious for his depreda- courts, each trying to out-do his companions in tions on the poultry in his neighbourhood, was servility ;-when a pert malicious ape, who

Bishop Heber's Journal. once discovered in the fact, and so closely pur- wished to give his powerful master some pain,

(Second Notice.) sued by the enraged peasants, whose property and yet escape his rage, as he well knew it was It is not onur wont, amidst the

multiplicit he had invaded, that he did not escape without as much as his life was worth to offend him publications on subjects which continually several severe blows and wounds, of which he openly, therefore sought how he might artfully up and claim our attention, to drug our res made grievous complaint and great outcry when mortify him under the mask of friendship, but even with the best things. But, do wha he arrived among his companions, declaring, at keep out of the scrape himself, and at the same may, we can only indicate, certainly nei the same time, that he neither knew nor could time insidiously cause the ruin of his competi- illustrate nor discuss, the great beautie

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these volumes. Were we in ill humour with long, and formed like those of Europe. The seems to be the same disorder of the eyes with
aurselves or the world, we think a half hour arrows were also of bamboo, with an iron head which people are aflicted who live on damaged
of Bishop Heber's page would reconcile us to coarsely made, and a long single barb. Those or inferior rice, in itself a food of very little
either. There is a suavity, a kindness, a fine intended for striking fish had this head so con. nourishment, and probably arises from a weak.
human sympathy, in every syllable he breathes, trived as to slip off from the shaft when the fish ness of the digestive powers. I was grieved
which elevates our species'; and instead of was struck, but to remain connected with it to think I had insulted a man who might be in
having our bosoms filled with such painful and by a long line, on the principle of the barpoon. distress."
loathing emotions as the writings of a Hunt The shaft, in consequence, remained as a float Soon after, the traveller encounters some
ar a Hazlitt excite, we derive from such pub- on the water, and not only contributed to weary drunkards, and relates :
lications as this, and Lord Collingwood's Me- out the animal, but shewed his pursuer which “I had seen very few drunken men in India
moirs, a pleasure of the purest kind. We must way he fled, and thus enabled him to seize it.” before, but the time of Hoolee' is now coming
continue our extracts.

At Bheelwara the Bishop met Captain Ger-on, which is the Hindoo carnival, and in which
The Bishop met in his course the Rajpoot ard, and gives a characteristic sketch of that the people of central India more particularly
Rajah of Bunaira. “ He was splendidly gentleman.

indulge in all kinds of riot and festivity. The
dressed, with a very glittering turban, a “ Captain Gerard I found, under a very sepoys of my guard bave begun to assail the
shield slung on his back, and a remarkably modest exterior, a man of great science and women whom they pass on their march with
elegant sword and dagger in his sash. His information ; he was one of the persons most singing and indecent language,-a thing sel-
horse was led by two grooms tolerably well concerned in the measurement and exploring dom practised at other times. This is also the
dothed; the attire of his silver-stick and stands of the Himalaya mountains, had been in Ladak, season for pelting each other with red powder,
and bearers, and other servants, was not in and repeatedly beyond the Chinese frontier, as we have seen practised in Calcutta."
very good repair, and his own cane was carried though repelled each time, after penetrating a In his progress, the Bishop saw something of
by a naked boy of about fourteen. He was an few miles, by the Tartar cavalry. He had the people called Bheels, now in a very low
elderly man, and had lost many of his teeth, himself ascended to the height of 19,600 feet, estate, though unquestionably the possessors of
which made it very difficult for me to undera or 400 higher than Humboldt had ever climbed the country before the Rajpoots. He tells us :
stand him. This does not seem a usual in. amid the Andes; and the latter part of his “ On our first approaching the Bheel vil-
frmity in India; but the rajah's red eyes and ascent, for about two miles, was on an inclined lages, a man ran from the nearest hut to the
pager emaciated countenance sufficiently proved plane of 42, a nearer approach to the perpendi. top of a hill, and gave a shrill shout or scream,
him to be an opium-eater. It is, fortu. cular than Humboldt conceived it possible to which we heard repeated from the furthest
nately, the custom in this part of the world for climb for any distance together. Nothing, he hamlet in sight, and again from two others
persons of very high rank to converse anly said, could exceed the care with which Major which we could not see. I asked the meaning
through the medium of a confidential servant; Hodgson, Mr. Frazer, and himself, had ascer- of this, and my suwarrs assured me that these

a
and I gladly made use of this etiquette, using tained the altitude of the hills.”

were their signals to give the alarm of our tha dák jemautdar, whose Hindoostanee I un- Of the native princes in central India, the coming, our mimbers, and that we had horse derstood pretty well, as the channel of commu- Ranah of Oodeypoor is a remarkable specimen. with us. By this means they knew at once nication with the muttering old rajpoot. The “He has a large extent of territory, and, in whether it was advisable to attack us, to fly, efect, however, of this procedure was abund- ordinary years, a singularly fertile one, were or to remain quiet, while if there were any azdy ludicrous. Tell the Rajah Sahib that I these people to cultivate it. But he was quite of them of their number who had particular am happy to meet him, and hope he is in good ruined and beggared by Bapoo Sindia and Jum- reasons for avoiding an interview with the health" thus rendered: The Lord Sahib de- sheed Khản. Half his revenues at least are troops and magistrates of the lowlands, they prees that he is happy to see your worship, and mortgaged to shroffs and money-lenders, and had thus fair warning given them to keep out hopes you are in good health. "Tell the Lord his people are pitiably racked in order to pay of the way. This sounds like a description of Rahib that I am in very good health, thanks to the exorbitant interest of his debts. It has Rob Roy's country; but these poor Bheels his arrival and provision, and that I hope he is been the misfortune of his family to have been are far less formidable enemies than the old sell;' rendered, "The Rajah Sahib makes re- the oldest and purest in India ; to be descended Macgregors. In the afternoon we walked up presentation that he is very well, thanks to in a right line from the Sun without any de to one of the nearest hills, where were some Huzoor's arrival,' &c. In this way we talked basing mixture, having resisted all attempts of huts of this unfortunate nation. They were various subjects in our way to the bunga- the emperors of Delhi to effect an intermar. all shut up; and an old man who came to meet

riage of the houses, and reckoning, I believe, us, said that they were empty. He himself, A new mode of fishing is soon after described in their pedigree, one or two Avatars of the and a young man, who was, he said, his -" The fish were the inhabitants of a large Deity. In consequence, they have been gene- nephew, remained alone in the place : all the pool close to the castle hill, which appeared, in rally half mad with pride, perpetually marrying rest were with their cattle in the jungle. Dr. the rains, to cover about eighty acres, being among themselves, fond of show and magniti- Smith, who has an excellent ear, and knows then supplied from the Bunass river. It cence beyond their means or the usual custom Hindoostanee well, was able to converse with berually retained its water all the year, but this of Hindoo sovereigns, and very remarkably these people more readily than any of our anuel season had already brought it very low, deficient in knowledge and intelligence. The party, and said that it was chiefly in accent sud in a month more they calculated that it present Ranah adds to all these advantages a and tone that their language differed from the would be quite dry. Accordingly, all hands great fondness for opium."

dialect usually spoken in Malwah. They speak Fere now at work to catch the fish while they

The following notices an interesting fact in in a drawling sort of recitative, which Dr. sere yet alive; and people from the whole an interesting manner :

Smith imitated, and found them catch his serantry round about had 'assembled either for “ In our way back through the town, a man meaning much better than they otherwise this purpose, or to purchase them, a very large begged of me, saying that he was blind. On could. The old man said that they had sufwere being to be had for a single pice. Cap. my calling him, however, he came forwards so fered much

from want of rain, that their crops taia Gerard, an engineer officer who met me readily to the torches, and saw, I thought, so had been very scanty, that there was little bere

, went to see the chase, and said it was clearly, that I asked him what he meant by pasture left for their cattle ; and, what was
every curious. The fish were pursued in the telling me such a lie. He answered that he worst of all, they expected the pools of the
phalow muddy water with sticks, spears, and was night-blind (* rat unda'), and I, not un neighbouring nullah to dry up before the end
banda
, in all directions ; but there

was little derstanding the phrase, and having been a good of the hot weather. When that happened, he execution done, till four Bheels,

the service deal worried during the day with beggars, for said, with much resignation, they must go # the Codeypoor government made their ap- the whole fort is a swarm of nothing else, said

, down to Doongurpoor, or some other place pearance

. The rabble were then driven away; peevishly, - darkness is the time for sleep, not where there was water, and do as well as they read these savages, with their bows and arrows, for seeing. The people laughed as at a good could. Both the men were evidently in fear, niade in a few hours that havoc among the fish thing ; but I was much mortified afterwards to and even trembled ; they shewed an anxiety which produced such plenty in the camp, tiud that it was an unfeeling retort

. The dis- that we should not go near their huts, and out the largest, and striking them ease of night-blindness, that is, of requiring were unwilling to trust themselves with us as with as much certainty as if they had been the full light of day to see, is very common, far as our tents, though they perfectly under

Their bows were of Dr. Smith said, among the lower classes in stood my promise that they should have some pie kamboos, very simply made, but strong India ; and to some professions of men, such as thing to eat. . pressed the young man to and elastic, more so, I think, than those of soldiers, very inconvenient. The sepoys ascribe shoot one of his arrows at a mark, but he ufalo-born , which are generally

used in Hin- it to bad and insufficient food ; and it is said to had only two with him, and he looked at us lecture. They were about four feet six inches l be always most prevaleut in a scarcity. It) all round as if he feared we wanted to make

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