The Works of Edmund Spenser, Volum 4

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F. C. & J. Rivington, 1805
 

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Pàgina 467 - ... quight: And their great mother Venus did lament The losse of her deare brood, her deare delight: Her hart was pierst with pitty at the sight, When walking through the Gardin them she spyde, Yet no'te...
Pàgina 222 - To th' instruments divine respondence meet; The silver sounding instruments did meet With the base murmure of the waters fall; The waters fall with difference discreet, Now soft, now loud, unto the wind did call; The gentle warbling wind low answered to all.
Pàgina 357 - And I beheld, and heard an angel flying through the midst of heaven, saying with a loud voice, Woe, woe, woe, to the inhabiters of the earth by reason of the other voices of the trumpet of the three angels, which are yet to sound!
Pàgina 233 - See the mind of beastly man, That hath so soone forgot the excellence Of his creation, when he life began, That now he chooseth with vile difference To be a beast, and lacke intelligence...
Pàgina 27 - Let a bear robbed of her whelps meet a man, rather than a fool in his folly.
Pàgina 216 - Out of this fountaine, sweet and faire to see, The which into an ample laver fell, And shortly grew to so great quantitie, That like a litle lake it seemd to bee; Whose depth exceeded not three cubits hight, That through the waves one might the bottom see, All pav'd beneath with jaspar shining bright, That seemd the fountaine in that sea did sayle upright.
Pàgina 221 - Eftsoones they heard a most melodious sound, Of all that mote delight a daintie eare, Such as attonce might not on living ground, Save in this Paradise, be heard elsewhere : Right hard it was for wight which did it heare, To read what manner musicke that mote bee ; For all that pleasing is to living eare Was there consorted in one harmonee ; Birdes...
Pàgina 159 - As pale and wan as ashes was his looke, His body leane and meagre as a rake, And skin all withered like a dryed rooke, Thereto as cold and drery as a snake, That seemd to tremble evermore, and quake : All in a canvas thin he was bedight, And girded with a belt of twisted brake: Upon his head he wore an helmet light, Made of a dead mans skull, that seemd a ghastly sight.
Pàgina 191 - Which seem'd to fly for feare them to behold. Ne wonder, if these did the knight appall ; For all that here on earth we dreadfull hold, Be but as bugs to fearen babes withall, Compared to the creatures in the seas entrall.
Pàgina 469 - But of the trees owne inclination made, Which knitting their rancke braunches part to part, With wanton yvie twyne entrayld athwart, And eglantine and caprifole emong, Fashiond above within their inmost part, That nether Phoebus beams could through them throng, Nor Aeolus sharp blast could worke them any wrong.

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