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118, Pall Mall.

That would

J. M. BULLOCH.

'Dialogus inter Academicum et Rusticum,' managing of my esteat."
recited in the Theatre at this inauguration. make 1650 his birth-year.
In it, as in many other classical productions
of that date, the penultimate vowel of
Academia is made short. This year 1759
was styled from the great victories of the
British arms
Annus Mirabilis."

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JOHN PICKFORD, M.A. Newbourne Rectory, Woodbridge.

"FAIR-COPY."-The earliest illustrative quotation for fair-copy in 'H.E.D.' is of 1840 as a verb and 1873 as a noun; but the combination would seem to be of a decidedly anterior date to either. Mr. George Bernard Shaw, in the preface to his published play The Devil's Disciple,' referring to General Burgoyne's surrender at Saratoga, says :"The explanation of his defeat given in the play is founded on a passage quoted by De Fonblanque from Fitzmaurice's Life of Lord Shelburne as follows: Lord George Germain, having among other peculiarities a particular dislike to be put out of his way on any occasion, had arranged to call at his office on his way to the country to sign the dispatches; but as those addressed to Howe had not been fair-copied, and he was not disposed to be balked of his projected visit to Kent, they were not signed then, and were forgotten on his return home.'

Sir George Trevelyan, in his lately published volume on The American Revolution,' in doubting the truth of the story, employs the same word fair-copied :—

"It is stated that a letter, giving Sir William Howe positive and explicit orders to co-operate with Burgoyne, had been drafted in the English War Office at the end of March; but that Germain went out of town before it was fair-copied, and forgot to sign and send it. To any one who has had charge of a public department with Permanent Secretaries, and Private Secretaries, to keep him in mind of his duties-the story is unbelievable. It has its origin in a private memoir by Lord Shelburne; but Lord Shelburne, when jotting down reminiscences in the seclusion of his study, was no safe authority for anecdotes reflecting upon the public men of his own time."

There should be no difficulty, therefore, in tracing the word beyond 1840.

ALFRED F. ROBBINS.

FIRST DUKE OF GORDON'S BIRTH.-In the absence of a definite date it is usually said that the first Duke was 66 about ten years of age " when he succeeded his father in 1653. As a matter of fact, his father and mother were married in October, 1644. But a much better test is afforded by the letter the Duke wrote to Lauderdale on 4 July, 1664 (Add. MS. 23, 122, f. 80): "Now, my Lord, having allmost attined to the 14 year of my agge complit, I ame resolved to chose my curators for the better

Queries.

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I imagine, take their view of Prior and of HIS CHLOE.-Most people, his Chloe from Spence's 'Anecdotes' and Johnson's 'Lives." I have, however, lately met with the following paragraph on the subject, in which a very different colour is given to the commonly-received opinion

:

"It was not Pope, however, that, of all the Queen Anne men, Wesley admired most, but rather Prior. He quotes him repeatedly in the Journal'; and when Samuel Johnson, in the newly issued 'Lives of Prior's character and of his verse, Wesley, then of the Poets,' spoke in terms of depreciation both in his eightieth year, came to the defence of his favourite poet in a most spirited paper. Prior, he asserts, was not half so bad a man as his critics have painted him; while, as to the Chloe of the better than she should be, Wesley declares, on the charming lyrics, who had been represented as no authority of his brother Samuel, who knew her well, that she was an estimable Miss Taylor of Westminster, who refused the advances of the poet while he was living, and spent hours weeping at his tomb after he was dead."- From C. T. Winchester's 'Life of Wesley.'

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One would be glad to have this account
confirmed, especially as regards
Surely such charming verses as Prior's were
Chloe.'
not inspired by a worthless woman.

T. M. W.

DAVIDSON CLAN.-I should be greatly obliged to any of your readers who would give me information on the following points connected with the clan Davidson :

1. The ancestry of Pillichattan Mor, the ancestor of Clann Dhai, Clann Mhurich, &c.

2. Any information concerning the disputes between the Davidsons and MacPhersons, particularly as to which son of Pillichattan Mor, Dai Dubh was.

3. Any information, or the names of any books since 1386. or articles, about the Davidsons

4. Was the blue falcon ever a cognizance of the Davidsons, as Scott says in 'The Fair Maid of Perth,' and does the eagle's head crest of Tulloch refer to that?

Replies should be addressed to me care of Mr. William Bryce, Bookseller, Edinburgh. CLANN DHAI.

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ROMANS AT YORK.-In Sir H. Drummond Wolff's Rambling Recollections,' the following passage occurs :

"On my way to Scotland I was detained at York for two days in the height of summer. In the daytime the streets were perfectly empty, but in the evening the whole population turned out, and the town was almost impassable. This habit was one that I had only previously seen in Italy. Later, when travelling, I met a gentleman-I think his name was Mr. Wallace-who seemed to have a great deal of antiquarian knowledge. I told him what I had noticed in York, and he replied, "The

reason is that for more than forty years a Roman legion was quartered there. Since then the inhabitants of York all have Roman noses, while Yorkshiremen are generally inclined to be snubnosed.' With me, he attributed the fact of the streets being crowded during the summer evenings

to the same cause. "9

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BURIAL-GROUND OF ST. GEORGE'S, HANOVER SQUARE, BAYSWATER ROAD.-I am engaged in some genealogical research, and I am desirous of knowing whether any printed list of inscriptions on tombstones in this burial-ground has ever been published, or whether any manuscript list is in existence. My inquiry refers more particularly to the early part of the nineteenth century. A. F. H.

ASKEW OR AYSCOUGH FAMILY.-I shall

be greatly obliged by information, or suggestions as to the source of information, concerning the descendants of the family to which Anne Askew, the martyr, belonged. I have a special interest in the subject, having been always led to suppose that I am descended from that family. My greatgrandfather married a Miss Askew in Cumberland, and the Christian names Anne Askew are common among my relations.

E. W.

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FALSE QUANTITIES.-Quite recently I was reading an article on famous false quantities made in speeches. I remember two instances: "Moritur et moriens, &c." and Sunt plura bona at end of a hexaCan any one refer me to the article? G. W. E. R. [Is it Mr. H. Paul's' Decay of Classical Quotation' (Nineteenth Century, April, 1896), or Bishop Welldon's on "The Art of Classical Quotation' in the same magazine for April, 1905? A Last Ramble in the Classics,' by H. E. P. Platt (1906), gives the line from Martial ending in "sunt plura bona" as quoted by Lord Clarendon. See his short article on False Quantities on p. 153. See also 10 S. ix. 354, 512.

CONSCIENTIOUS SCRUPLES AGAINST WAR. -The following is the substance of the Constable's statement, respecting a distraint taken from John Paul, a member of the Society of Friends at Tavistock for refusing to lend his waggon to convey military baggage in consequence of his conscientious scruples against war :

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BURNEY'S 'HISTORY OF MUSIC.'-Does any reader know the exact collation of Burney's History of Music,' 1776-89, 4 vols, 4to? Apparently one volume was issued in 1776, and a second edition, with new plates, in 1788, when the other three volumes appeared. There is no list of plates in the FRANCIS P. MARCHANT. 1776 volume.

Streatham Common. SCOTCH TOUR: TITLE WANTED.-Can any reader give me the title of a work published in 2 vols., 8vo, somewhere about 1830? It was written by a lady, and described a tour made in Scotland. It was illustrated by herself.

W. E. WILSON

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"FEMMER."-I shall be glad if some reader will give me the meaning and origin and spelling of a word pronounced 66 femmer," meaning rickety or frail. My mother, who used many Scotch words, employed this one, which I am unable to find in a dictionary. JAMES W. WALKER. Chicago.

BLETCHINGLY PLACE.-This house before it was pulled down, with the exception of the Gate House (Place Farm), in 1680 was occupied on at least one occasion by Anne of Cleves when she owned the manor. Does any description or engraving of the

4. Was the blue falcon ever a cognizance of the Davidsons, as Scott says in The Fair Maid of Perth,' and does the eagle's head crest of Tulloch refer to that?

Replies should be addressed to me care of Mr. William Bryce, Bookseller, Edinburgh. CLANN DHAI.

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ROMANS AT YORK.-In Sir H. Drummond Wolff's Rambling Recollections,' the following passage occurs :

"On my way to Scotland I was detained at York for two days in the height of summer. In the daytime the streets were perfectly empty, but in the evening the whole population turned out, and the town was almost impassable. This habit was one that I had only previously seen in Italy. Later, when travelling, I met a gentleman-I think his name was Mr. Wallace-who seemed to have a great deal of antiquarian knowledge. I told him what I had noticed in York, and he replied, "The reason is that for more than forty years a Roman legion was quartered there. habitants of York all have Roman noses, while Yorkshiremen are generally inclined to be snubnosed.' With me, he attributed the fact of the streets being crowded during the summer evenings

to the same cause."

Since then the in

It would be interesting to know (1) whether the Roman legion stationed at York was composed of Italians, (2) whether the citizens of York go out in the evening more than those of other towns, (3) whether their Roman than the average. From my own recollection I should answer the last two questions in the negative.

noses are more

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LAWRENCE PHILLIPS.

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BURIAL-GROUND OF ST. GEORGE'S, HANOVER SQUARE, BAYSWATER ROAD.—I am engaged in some genealogical research, and I am desirous of knowing whether any printed list of inscriptions on tombstones in this burial-ground has ever been published, or whether any manuscript list is in existence. My inquiry refers more particularly to the early part of the nineteenth A. F. H. century.

ASKEW OR AYSCOUGH FAMILY.-I shall

be greatly obliged by information, or suggestions as to the source of information, concerning the descendants of the family to which Anne Askew, the martyr, belonged. I have a special interest in the subject, having been always led to suppose that I am descended from that family. My greatgrandfather married a Miss Askew in Cumberland, and the Christian names Anne Askew are common among my relations.

E. W.

HENRY ELLISON.-I should like to know something of this writer, some half a dozen of whose sonnets Leigh Hunt had the insight Book of the Sonnet,' to include in his

which was published in 1867 by Sampson Low & Co. Neither Mr. Sharp nor Mr. Waddington thought Ellison deserving of inclusion in their several anthologies.

M. L. R. BRESLAR.

Percy House, South Hackney.

SEARLE OR SERLE OF EPPING.-Can any of your readers give me genealogical information regarding this Essex family, which apparently flourished in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, or refer me to any record, printed or otherwise, where I can find a pedigree?

SIGMA TAU.

DE ST. PHILIBERT.-I should be glad to receive some genealogical particulars as to Roger and Hugh de Sancto Philiberto, who were parties to a Fine (1 July, 1206) concerning land in Bray in Berkshire, in Welles in Norfolk, and in Tremerdred (Tremodred On 8 May, 1244, in Duloe) in Cornwall. Hugh was concerned with Robert Rastel in a Fine dealing with Lantonnan in Cornwall. J. HAMBLEY ROWE, M.B.

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FALSE QUANTITIES.-Quite recently I BURNEY'S 'HISTORY OF MUSIC.'-Does was reading an article on famous false any reader know the exact collation of Burquantities made in speeches. I remember ney's History of Music,' 1776–89, 4 vols, two instances: Moritur et moriens, &c." 4to? Apparently one volume was issued and "Sunt plura bona' at end of a hexa- in 1776, and a second edition, with new plates, meter. Can any one refer me to the article? in 1788, when the other three volumes G. W. E. R. appeared. There is no list of plates in the 1776 volume. FRANCIS P. MARCHANT. Streatham Common.

[Is it Mr. H. Paul's' Decay of Classical Quotation' (Nineteenth Century, April, 1896), or Bishop Welldon's on 'The Art of Classical Quotation' in the same magazine for April, 1905? A Last Ramble in the Classics,' by H. E. P. Platt (1906), gives the line from Martial ending in "sunt plura bona" as quoted by Lord Clarendon. See his short article on False Quantities on p. 153. See also 10 S. ix. 354, 512.

CONSCIENTIOUS SCRUPLES AGAINST WAR. -The following is the substance of the Constable's statement, respecting a distraint taken from John Paul, a member of the Society of Friends at Tavistock for refusing to lend his waggon to convey military baggage in consequence of his conscientious scruples against war :

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HARVEY'S BIRTHPLACE. Dr. William Harvey, the discoverer of the circulation of the blood, was born 1 April, 1578, at Folkestone, and a question has recently arisen as to the site of the house. The D.N.B.' states that he was born

"in a house which was in later times the posthouse of the town, and which still belongs to Caius College, Cambridge, to which Harvey bequeathed it."

On the other hand, a local guide states that 'Harvey settled his paternal estate in Kent upon the College "-meaning the Royal College of Physicians. R. J. FYNMORE.

Which is correct?
Sandgate.

"FEMMER."-I shall be glad if some reader will give me the meaning and origin and spelling of a word pronounced 66 femmer," meaning rickety or frail. My mother, who used many Scotch words, employed this one, which I am unable to find in a dictionary. JAMES W. WALKER. Chicago.

BLETCHINGLY PLACE.-This house before it was pulled down, with the exception of the Gate House (Place Farm), in 1680 was occupied on at least one occasion by Anne of Cleves when she owned the manor. Does any description or engraving of the

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