Imatges de pàgina
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determine the character of the forms involved, by the rules propounded in the preceding pages; in proof of which the student has only to study attentively the following examples.

Instances of absolute complex compounds, whose sense is complete and unconnected, are not rare.

a. The following are examples: ^MjnKI^Pr) ^vrnpfrfrr 'good and evil (occurring) in the revolutions ofthe interval of time,' the whole being a dependent, involving a dependent and a copulative; ♦mjHpn.'icpTUrSJT 'the general of the army and the overseer of the forces,' the whole being a copulative, involving two dependents; ^n^fTTlfirWTr^TO 'the protection from sorrow, enemies, and perils,' the whole being a dependent, involving an aggregative; ssmvlfiri Hijgifq 'the disregarded words of a friend,' the whole being a descriptive, involving B dependent; SJiJiltl^MlcM^IH 'a white robe and a string of garlands,' the whole being a copulative, involving a descriptive and dependent; "^•'tfl.^K.1"^ 'one who has gone to the opposite bank (pdra) of all the Sastras,' i. e. ' one who has read them through;' TrTftr^T^ftftT' the bones of a dead lion.'

771. The greater number of complex compounds are used as adjectives, or relatively, as epithets of some other word in the sentence; thus, TfairTRnT'Pra, "it, -R, 'whose nails and eyes were decayed,' the whole being the relative form of descriptive, involving a copulative; WTTOT +WQ 'having a throat emaciated with hunger,' the whole being the relative form of descriptive, involving a dependent.

o. Other examples are, 9js<mi<^i«iwhi«', -TTj -R, 'having a white garland and unguents,' the whole being the relative form of copulative, involving a descriptive; slnoiHifcill^ 'broad-shouldered and strong-armed,' the whole being a copulative, involving two descriptives; WTtWJllI, -TTT, -IT, ' done in a former birth,' the whole being a dependent, involving two descriptive; ("twi^qM'.1*1» AT, A, ' advanced in learning and age,' the whole being a dependent, involving a copulative; <pmrl.fclq wt^\R «, -PT, -t 'having fresh garlands, and being free from dust,' the whole being the relative form of copulative, involving a descriptive and dependent; ^sfVMonjejPjHiW, -TTW, -TW," whose head was moist with unction;' TTfanPJW^t -W, -W, 'having the face turned in any direction one likes;' JJIcJ.Wfit.^WW, -mt, -W,' spear and club in hand;' «?« «i«4P*i%i f: Ipq, -RT, -w, 'sufficient for support during one night' (see 77M; qj'^Jj^HWJW^d^il'^j^jPHpi^ 'acquainted with the meaning of the three Vedas, called Rig, Yajur, and Sama;' «^».<^«?.iim4^am 'biting their lips and having red eyes' (agreeing with *j»iin«); ''Ss'c.^.Jl^ 'injuring another by action or by intention.'

77a. The substantive wiO;, 'a beginning,' often occurs in complex relative

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