The Progress of Society

Portada
J. Murray, 1830 - 411 pàgines
 

Què en diuen els usuaris - Escriviu una ressenya

No hem trobat cap ressenya als llocs habituals.

Altres edicions - Mostra-ho tot

Frases i termes més freqüents

Passatges populars

Pàgina 226 - Let there be no strife, I pray thee, between me and thee, and between my herdmen and thy herdmen ; for we be brethren. Is not the whole land before thee ? separate thyself, I pray thee, from me : if thou wilt take the left hand, then I will go to the right; or if thou depart to the right hand, then I will go to the left.
Pàgina 201 - ... disturbances, the universal law of almost every nation (which is a kind of secondary law of nature) has either given the dying person a power of continuing his property, by disposing of his possessions by will; or, in case he neglects to dispose of it, or is not permitted to make any disposition at all, the municipal law of the country then steps in, and declares who shall be the successor, representative, or heir of the deceased...
Pàgina xiv - The Evidence that there is a Being, all-powerful, wise, and good, by whom everything exists ; and particularly, to obviate difficulties regarding the wisdom and goodness of the Deity; and this...
Pàgina 202 - Yet, reasonable as this foundation of the right of inheritance may seem, it is probable that its immediate original arose not from speculations altogether so delicate and refined, and, if not from fortuitous circumstances, at least from a plainer and more simple principle. A man's children or nearest relations are usually about him on his death-bed, and are the earliest witnesses of his decease. They become therefore generally the next immediate occupants, till at length in process of time this frequent...
Pàgina 326 - In the first twenty-five years the population would be twenty-two millions, and the food being also doubled, the means of subsistence would be equal to this increase. In the next twe.ntyfive years the population would be forty-four millions, and the means of subsistence only equal to the support of thirty-three millions.
Pàgina 133 - ... corn, when considered only in this point of view, will be different on almost every different field. How then, it may be asked, can its intrinsic value be ascertained over a vast tract of country, possessing a diversity of soils, of various degrees of fertility? and how shall matters be so managed, as that all the rearers of it shall draw nearly the same price for their grain, and have nearly the same profits? "All this is effected in the easiest and most natural manner, by means of rent. Rent...
Pàgina 348 - ... all comparison more dreadful, When the common people of a country live principally upon the dearest grain, as they do in England on wheat, they have great resources in a scarcity; and barley, oats, rice, cheap soups, and potatoes, all present themselves as less expensive yet at the same time wholesome means of nourishment; but when their habitual food is the lowest in this scale, they appear to be absolutely without resource, except in the bark of trees, like the poor Swedes; and a great portion...
Pàgina 134 - Now, as the expense of cultivating the least fertile soil is as great or greater than that of the most fertile field, it necessarily follows that, if an equal quantity of corn, the produce of each field, can be sold at the same price, the profit on cultivating the most fertile soil must be much greater than that of cultivating the others...
Pàgina 201 - For, naturally speaking, the instant a man ceases to be, he ceases to have any dominion: else, if he had a right to dispose of his acquisitions one moment beyond his life, he would also have a right to direct their disposal for a million of ages after him, which would be highly absurd and inconvenient.

Informació bibliogràfica