Imatges de pàgina
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and extent with the administrative provinces, is supported by government, is attended by the and into some eight hundred parishes. Edu- happiest results. We are called to witness cation is very generally diffused, and gratui- the benefit of these schools, which is manitous elementary instruction is placed within fested in the conduct of Norwegian emigrants the reach of all; and all children of seven who seek our shores, who bring with them an years, in towns, and of eight years, in the intelligence that immediately fits them to country, are required to be in attendance at comprehend our institutions, and, by their school till confirmation, usually between the well-directed industry and tact, become speedages of fourteen and seventeen. The elemen- ily the best settlers of the West. There are tary schools are stationed in all towns and many townships in that Great Beyond comparishes. There are also middle schools, mid- posed entirely of Norwegians, who bring with dle and royal schools, burgher schools, Latin them the virtues of the Fatherland to graft or learned schools, Cathedral schools in several upon our own, not forgetting, here, the church places, and at the head, over all, the Univer- and the school that gave the basis of their sity of Christiana. This school system, which character there.

THE NYMPHS' GROTTO AT CAPRI. Our picture on page 320 gives simply the cave, and her description surpasses that of all form of the beautiful grotto of Capri which the rest, which we copy: has so long delighted visitors. It is situated “Just where the waves broke against the about twenty-five miles from Naples, from rocks, we saw a small opening in them, and which steamboats take the visitor to the spot. soon after entering a little boat, we rowed Traditionally this is one of the haunts of the towards it. As we approached it, our boatEmperor Tiberius, in which he held some of man called out, ‘Lie down in the boat.' his orgies, but it is not authentic. It bears Obeying his command, we soon felt ourselves the title of the “Grotto of Nymphs,” which carried quickly onward upon the crest of a is a very poetical and pretty designation for great wave. For an instant the darkness was one of the most beautiful places in the world. intense, and a sharp pang of fear assailed me; We wish it were in our power to depict the but in another we seemed to have er tersd a vivid colors of the stalactites which hang from fairy land of mystery and dazzling light. We its fretted roof, the sand which glows in the seemed floating in the air. The water was beams of the azure light, or the crystal-tinted deeply blue, and the atmosphere of the same water that flashes like gems on every hand. color. A vast arched roof rose above us; beThe remarkable transparency of the sea, and neath it, stretched far away long corridors the azure brilliance of the reflected light in and aisles, whose pavement was of a rich turthe grotto constitute its unique charms. quoise blue, as smooth and calm as though it The deep water, flowing into the cave through were stone and not living water. From the the oarrow entrance, seen in the picture, is of roof hung multitudes of stalactites, around the hue and transparency of the lightest and which was playing a clear blue flame, like brightest sapphire. A traveller remarks that burning spirits of wine. . The fish swimming he never saw such translucence as the sea below us were as blue as the jaybirds of our possesses round the rocks of Capri, nor such forests, and the walls and broken rocks seembeautiful specimens of iris-hued sands lying ed carved from a quarry of lapis-lazuli. It was beneath, greener than emeralds. Another wonderful, unique, and the fit abode of seatells us that when he had entered into the nymphs, which the people of Capri say still low-arching vault, and looked back to where inhabit it; while the Neapolitans call it the the light streamed through the aperture, it Witches' Cave.' The depth of the water is appeared of a cerulean hue, so fine and ethe- about eight fathoms. Near the centre of the real that it resembled undulating flames. “I grotto is a landing-place, leading to a corridor, should say,” he continues, "that the very which, after a few feet, is found closed up by Spirit of Light bad descended here and held a great stone. In the time of Tiberius, it no her throne upon these waters, veiling her ra- doubt served as a bath for the luxurious mondiancy with its robes of azure." A distin- arch; and the subterranean passage led from guished countrywoman of ours visited the bis palace on the cliff far, far above it."

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so AS BY FIRE.

BY MISS CAMILLA WILLIAN

CHAPTER VII.

looking at her he saw that she was fainting.

Helen Jameson was just coming down, SKIRMISHING.

having been called to meet Colonel Burkmar, WHEN Cora Ware looked up from her when she saw Cora sinking helplessly upon a cousin's embrace and saw Colonel Burkmar sofa, and a strange gentleman, standing by standing in the door, her heart sunk within her. her. From Albert Granger no forbearance “0, my goodness gracious!" she cried, was to be hoped for; and it was not likely knowing at once who this gentleman must that a man wearing the uniform of an officer be. “What has happened? Where is—" in the Northern arıny would shield or spare looking about the room for Colonel Burkmar. one whom he might know to be an escaped “My cousin is faint. Pray do something Confederate prisoner, even were no other for her!” said the stranger, hastily. “ Dear cause of offence given. But arrest and in- Cora, do you feel better?” prisonment were the least she feared. There “Mother! Bridget! Juno! Cora is sick!" was danger of bloodshed.

called Helen, at the door, then ran to drench More through faintness than fondness she the invalid with cologne. sank closer to her cousin's breast again, look- Cora opened her eyes and looked about ing past him to that pale face in the door. anxiously, But was it anger she read? It seemed rather “ He has gone!" Helen whispered, in her the stern pallor caused by some pang of ear. “Did they meet? Did they know each unutterable pain.

other?” Eren in that moment of terror a strange "I am sorry to have alarmed you all,” Cora rapture crept into her heart, a wild sweetness said, for the whole household had rushed in. thrilled her, as though a bee had dropped “This is my Cousin Albert, Mrs. Jameson.” both honey and sting upon her lip. That “He went away without being seen,” Cora man's steady gaze, which fixed her eyes to whispered, as Helen bent to place a cushion his, mesmerized her into a dream as intoxi- under her head. cating as it seemed irrelevant.

"Are you better, dear ?” her cousin asked, The past is nothingness, the future is un- tenderly, bending his knee beside her, and certain, the blossom of life is the present softly stroking her hair with his white hand. moment, she thought. And what is life but Her faint, reassuring smile seemed to be love? And where is love so sweet as in the reflected in his face as he lifted it to thank midst of perils and difficulties ? like a rose the others for their assistance. amid thorns? And one moment of love is “Mother," Helen said, in an emphatic better than years of affection. Ah! to press aside, “ if all the Southerners are as handsome all the wine of the clustered years into one as these two, I hope they will beat us, that's intoxicating draught, drink it, and die! What all. If they will only conquer our ugliness, need of wooing and asking, when submission they may have their own way in everything would be so sweet?

else." A haze came over her eyes, but she dimly The cousins were soon left by all but Juno, saw that the soldier turned slowly away, who was weeping and rejoicing over her dear heard his step in the hall, heard the door Master Albert, and petting Cora close behind him.

“Jest one sup of wine, honey," she urged. “ Cora, dear, what is the matter ? her “ It'll bring the life back to yer face. Now cousin asked, anxiously. She made no reply, . Master Albert, see there !" she exclaimed, as only leaned more heavily upon him, and Cora took the glass with a hand that shook so

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