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rooms.

398
Glass barrels.- The Window-tax.

(Nov. ling glass of as fine “nut-brown ale," on all—the cheering light of day. To as Burton or Nottingham ever boasted. withhold it from any human being, not “Hey!” said I to my worthy host, incarcerated for crime, is unjust; as “ whence came this bright excellent violating the primeval command, "Let beverage ?” “From my cellar.”- there be light! and there was light.” “Why, I understood that the lightning Mr. Tierney's epigrammatic couplet and thunder had left you none fit to shall not here be quoted, for an obdrink : how has this escaped ?" "It vious reason. I will, however, express never occurred to me before ; but this its meaning without its blasphemy: was bottled.* Aye,” said 1, that “ The great Creator gave us light, has saved it. Glass is a non-conduc

And called its presence day : tor; and we are indebted to the va- But, with taxation, caine a blight, luable discovery of glass-making for

And took that light away." this good liquor. Joseph! give me But light is not the only advantage of another bumper. Here,” said I, “is windows. Superadded to the admissuccess to the glass-trade!”*

sion of that blessing, a requisite numNow, Sir, though the cooper will ber of them in a residence is also consay 'there is nothing like wood," ducive to health, by admitting a due might we not also (for special pur- portion of air, particularly in sleeping poses) have barrels, as well as bottles,

Whereas, it is notorious, in formed of glass? No one will pro- the country, that many farmers' sernounce this impracticable who has vants sleep in rooms with the windows seen that most magnificent specimen blocked up, to save the tax; thus sapof art—so creditable to the spirit and ping the constitutions of our peaingenuity of modern times—" the santry. I could corroborate this stateClarence Vase,” at the Queen's Ba- ment by facts which have come to my zaar in Oxford-street: an object (for knowledge; and medical gentlemen beauty and splendour) perhaps une- would confirm them. If Government qualled. I have termed it magnifi- cannot afford to lose the tax, let it cent; and it really is an image of the merge in the house-tax, or be supplied word, embodying the fullest idea we from

any

other source, so that we get can form of costly grandeur. Its ca- rid of the odious name. However, paciousness and weight are immense ; Sir, if I cannot benefit your readers by much greater, I believe, than the cele relieving them of a tax, I will, in conbrated marble one at Warwick Castle. clusion, endeavour to amuse them As that is a noble appendage to the with a glass-anecdote. On the southresidence of a Peer, this would be a ern side of the oldest glass-house in very appropriate one to the palace of a my neighbourhood was formerly a sunMonarch.

dial, bearing this motto—Ut Vitrum Being on the subject of glass, I sic Vita.In the same neighbourhood would, with due humility, suggest to resided a wit, who was ignorant of his Majesty's Ministers, that, by abo- Latin. Passing, one day, “the old lishing the odious window tax, they dial glass-house,” with a lady hangwould do an act as just as it would be ing on his arm, she said to him, “I popular. Nor, by the act, would the have often wished to know the meanrevenue be much diminished. For, ing of the words on that sun-dial ; windows to a house are like eyes to and, as you are

so very clever, no the human countenance : they enliven doubt you can tell me. What is it?" it. Let people have in their dwellings Now, Mr. Urban, as no man likes to as many of these as they choose, and, confess his ignorance-especially to a by a vast addition of windows, the lady-he promptly replied, * The duty on glass would be vastly aug. meaning, Ma'am? the meaning? why, mented : and, instead of the unsightly it is this : When the sun shines, you fronts of human habitations, which may see what o'clock it is.' now disfigure, with dismal signs of Yours, &c.

L. B. window tax, our villas and streets, we should behold houses looking as if they were happy residences, visited by what

Mr. URBAN, Bremhill, Nov. 22. a kind Providence meant freely to shine

I SHOULD be much obliged to

you, if you would allow me, through * I live, Mr. Urban, where glass is one of your pages, to correct an error I have the staple manufactures of the place, fallen into respecting the posthumous

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1831.] Bp. Ken.-Pluralities held by Puritans.

399 publication, in the name of Bishop

Brought over 1410 0 Ken, called “Expostulatoria.” Inad- Member of Assembly of Divertently, in speaking of the number vines, at 45. per day

73 0 of non-residents in every county, I ob- Apostleship in Oxford, at 108. served “ that it was singular no men

per day

182 10 tion was made of the non-residents in Somersetshire !

Total Pluralities

£.1665 10 The fact was, I had transcribed from this very old publication, of the Those preferred by the "godly.” date 1711, the list, in part; the last Parliamentary Visitors of Oxford, in leaf of the publication having fallen the seventeenth century, were most of out among my papers, and as I had

“ disinterested” as Harris ! looked only at the list 1 had before See the excellent remonstrance against transcribed, and imagined I had co- a late Edinburgh Reviewer, called pied the whole, I hastily concluded " Apologia Academica," just pubthat Somersetshire had been omitted. lished by Murray. Mr. Hume, who The last leaf of this publication, with perhaps may be the Head of the next the loan of which I was favoured by my Parliamentary Visitation at Oxford, friend Mr. Todd, the author of the ad. informed the House of Commons that mirable “ Life of Cranmer,” has since pluralities were unknown in the been found; and I see the non-residents Church of Rome!! We have seen reported in Somersetshire to be 87 in what they were in the Church of Gethe year 1711, instead of being omitted. neva in England; but of the Church

I take this opportunity of saying of Rome the last Cardinal in England, further, that I find the work attri. besides other possessions of the most buted to Bishop Ken, and publish- inordinate ecclesiastical wealth, had ed in his name the year after his only one Archbishopric of York! one death, was a reprint of a publication Bishopric of Lincoln !! one Bishopric in 1663, under the title “Ichabod," of Winchester!! It is not, however, &c. If, therefore, written by Ken, it to defend pluralities I write, but to remust have been written at an early quest insertion in your ancient and able period of his life, when Fellow of New Literary Journal of a literary explanaCollege, and three years after the tion, with some casual observations, Restoration of Charles the Second. not unimportant in the present day,

The "GROAN” on account of plurali. suggested by this explanation. ties possibly might not have been

1 &c. quite so loud, if the writer had con

W. L. Bowles. sidered that the preceding saints under Cromwell deserved the groan" for Mr. URBAN,

Oct. 22. pluralities much more than the restored PASSING a day this autumn at the clergy; for the following is the list of pleasant town of Penrith, I visited the PREFERMENTs of one among those some of the objects of interest in its professing Puritans. Harris was Pre- vicinity, and amongst them was the sident of Trinity College, Oxford, Pillar erected by the Countess of Pemnominated by the Parliamentary Visi- broke, Dorset, and Montgomery, to tors in the room of Dr. Potter, ejected commemorate the last parting with for his uncompromising virtue, and her mother, called by the people in the pronounced by the reforming Visitors neighbourhood, the Countess’s Pillar. "contumacious!” The godlyand It stands on a little green eminence on disinterested Puritan President, Harris, the right of the high road from Penwas put in the place of the learned rith to Appleby, which is also the road and virtuous Potter, who was left to to Appleby from Brougham Castle, poverty! Shortly afterwards we find whence no doubt the two ladies set " accepted” Harris in the possession out, the mother-who appears to have of the following pluralities!! at the been left at Brougham, as she died then value :

£. 8.

there seven weeks after the parting,Hanwell,

per annum, 1600 accompanying the daughter so far on Bishopgate, towards

400 0 her journey. The distance from Hanborough

300 O Brougham Castle is about half a mile. Puriton and Petersfield

550 0 The home view from the spot on which

it stands, is not in any respect strik1410 o ing: but in the distance, looking east

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400 Countess Pillar near Penrith.--Brougham Hall. [Nov. ward, we see the vast range of Cross great northern possessions. The other Fell, a line of lofty hills extending for is Clifford impaling Russell, the many miles, while behind, Saddleback achievement of the father or the moappears raised above the other hills. ther of the lady by whom the pillar

The pillar consists of an octagonal was erected; but plainly intended for shaft, each of the faces being twelve the lady, since there is no crest, while or fifteen inches in breadth. On this the red griffin of the Cliffords is given is raised a cube, over which is a kind over the other shield. of capital.

There is also on this face the date The shaft is plain; but on the face 1654. of the cube which is toward the road, The three other faces of the cube are two shields of arms, which ap- serve as the plates of sun-dials; but pear to have recently been repainted. in that on the side from the road is The one presents Clifford impaling inserted brass-plate containing the Vesci, Gules, 6 annulets Or, the mar- well-known inscription, of which the riage which gave the Cliffords their following is an exact copy :

THIS PILLAR WAS ERECTED ANNO 1650
BY YE RT HONOLE ANNE COUNTESS DOWAGER OF
PEMBROKE, &c. DAUGHTER AND COHEIRE OF YE RT
HONOBLE GEORGE EARL OF CUMBERLAND, &c. FOR A

MEMORIAL OF HER LAST PARTING IN THIS PLACE
WITH HER GOOD & PIOUS MOTHER YE RT HONOBLE
MARGARET COUNTESS DOWAGER OF CUMBERLAND,
YB 20 OF APRIL, 1616. IN MEMORY WHEREOF
SHE ALSO LEFT AN ANNUITY OF FOUR POUNDS
TO BE DISTRIBUTED TO THE POOR WITHIN THIS
PARRICH OF BROUGHAM EVERY 2D DAY OF APRIL
FOR EVER, UPON THE STONE TABLE HERE HARD BY.

LAVS DEO.

The inscription appears to be an castle, in a beautiful situation ; comaddition to the original design, and manding extensive views of this fine not to have been put up until after the country. The house itself has an air death of the Countess of Pembroke. of ancestorial pretension; the decoraIt is awkwardly placed in the face of tions of the old ceilings being the arms a sun-dial, and it is so much raised and quarterings or impalements of the above the eye of the spectator, that it Broughams. Great improvements are is read with difficulty.

now in progress; and in making them, The stone-table no longer exists, regard has been shown to the preserbut a stone still fixed firmly in the vation of the Roman inscriptions ground very near the pillar, seems to which have been found here. They mark the place where it stood; and a are inserted in one of the walls, and flat stone lying in the ditch under the in a situation where they are protecthedge at a short distance, is what ap. ed from the weather. pears to have been the table slab. One The taste for inscriptions prevails cannot but regret that a monument of in this district. I observed several a very interesting character should not (some of a recent date) at the little be kept up, and that since some cost village of Gamont Bridge. But there has been recently bestowed upon it, is one which invites attention, not the table on which the benefaction of more by the words themselves, than the Countess ought to be dispensed, by the careful manner in which the has not been restored.

letters have been cut : Brougham Castle is a ruin, but it is the ruin of a magnificent edifice. The

PATRIA EST. H. P. 1671. room which is the most entire, was evidently the chapel, a room of good I could learn nothing of the person proportions, on the south side of the who placed this over his door. Percastle, and having apartments be- haps some of your Correspondents may neath it.

be able to say by whom the words Brougham-hall, the seat of the were inscribed. ANAMNESTES. Chancellor, is about a mile from the

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AND AN EARTHENWARE CISTERN TEMP;

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