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JUDGMENTS

OF THE JUDICIAL COMMITTEE OF THE

PRIVY COUNCIL

IN CASES OF DOCTRINE AND DISCIPLINE.

&c. &c.

LONDON:

R. CLAY, SON, AND TAYLOR, PRINTERS, BREAD STREET HILL.

A COLLECTION OF

THE JUDGMENTS OF THE JUDICIAL COMMITTEE

OF THE PRIVY COUNCIL

IN

ECCLESIASTICAL CASES

RELATING TO

DOCTRINE AND DISCIPLINE:

WITH A PREFACE BY THE

LORD BISHOP OF LONDON,

AND

An Historical Introduction.

EDITED

(UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE LORD BISHOP OF LONDON)

BY

THE HON. GEORGE C. BRODRICK,

Barrister-at-Law and Fellow of Merton College,

AND

THE REV. WILLIAM H. FREMANTLE,

Chaplain to the Bishop of London, and late Fellow of All Souls' College.

LONDON:

JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET.

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PREFACE.

THE object of this publication is to bring before the Church, in an accessible form, the series of those Judgments which the Final Court of Appeal from the Ecclesiastical tribunals in England has pronounced in causes relating to doctrine and discipline since the Court assumed its present constitution. It is well that Churchmen should know, for the practical guidance of their own conduct, how the law under which they live is administered. Also, as it is the undoubted right of Englishmen to form an opinion respecting the institutions of their country, it is well that they should be enabled to examine this Court and its proceedings with their own eyes. If there be anything faulty in the Court, let its faults be remedied. But let those who desire to improve it make themselves quite sure that they know, in the first place, both what the Court is, and what it does. The knowledge generally possessed on this subject at present is vague, and the sources from which accurate information can be attained are little understood.

The questions involved in the constitution of such a Court are some of the most difficult with which statesmen have to deal. Obviously the Court is invested with great dignity and wide-spread influence. Not only does it pronounce judgment in causes relating to the highest of all interests, but it reviews decisions given in the name and under the authority-if not in the actual person-of those whose dignity amongst subjects is second to none in the realm. When Tenison, as Archbishop of Canterbury, summoned his comprovincial Bishops

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