Paper Talk: A History of Libraries, Print Culture, and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada Before 1960

Portada
Scarecrow Press, 2005 - 221 pàgines
The pre-1960 history of print culture and libraries, as they relate to the First Peoples of Canada, has gone largely untold. Paper Talk explores the relationship between the introduction of western print culture to Aboriginal peoples by missionaries, the development of libraries in the Indian schools in the nineteenth century, and the establishment of community-accessible collections in the twentieth century. While missionaries and the Department of Indian Affairs envisioned books and libraries as assimilative and "civilizing" tools, Edwards shows that some Aboriginal peoples articulated western ideas of print culture, literacy, books, and libraries as tools to assist their own cultural, social, and political aspirations. This text also serves to illustrate that the contemporary struggle of Aboriginal peoples in Canada to establish libraries in communities has a historical basis and that many of the obstacles faced today are remarkably similar to those encountered by earlier generations.
 

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Continguts

Contexts and Foundations
1
The Nineteenth Century
21
First Quarter of the Twentieth Century
73
1930 through 1960
121
Conclusion
163
Appendix 1
171
Appendix 2
181
Bibliography
189
Index
209
About the Author
Copyright

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Sobre l'autor (2005)

Brendan Frederick R. Edwards holds both a Master of Library and Information Studies degree and a Master of Arts in Canadian Studies and Native Studies.

Informació bibliogràfica