First (-Sixth) geographical reader. [With] Home-lesson book for Second (-Fourth) geographical reader

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PÓgina 188 - No more shall the war-cry sever, Or the winding rivers be red ; They banish our anger forever, When they laurel the graves of our dead. Under the sod and the dew, Waiting the judgment day ; Love and tears for the Blue ; Tears and love for the Gray.
PÓgina 188 - Sadly, but not with upbraiding The generous deed was done; In the storm of the years that are fading, No braver battle was won; Under the sod and the dew, Waiting the judgment day; Under the blossoms, the Blue; Under the garlands, the Gray...
PÓgina 239 - STORMONTH. Etymological and Pronouncing Dictionary of the English Language. Including a very Copious Selection of Scientific Terms. For Use in Schools and Colleges, and as a Book of General Reference. By the Rev. JAMES STORMONTH. The Pronunciation carefully Revised by the Rev. PH PHELP, MA Cantab. Tenth Edition, Revised throughout. Crown 8vo, pp. 800. 7s. 6d. Dictionary of the English Language...
PÓgina 188 - From the silence of sorrowful hours, The desolate mourners go, Lovingly laden with flowers, Alike for the friend and the foe. Under the sod and the dew, Waiting the judgment day, Under the roses the Blue, Under the lilies, the Gray.
PÓgina 187 - By the flow of the inland river, Whence the fleets of iron have fled, Where the blades of the grave-grass quiver, Asleep are the ranks of the dead; Under the sod and the dew, Waiting the judgment day; Under the one, the Blue; Under the other, the Gray.
PÓgina 172 - That from the fountains of Sonora glide Into the calm Pacific : Have ye fanned A nobler or a lovelier scene than this? Man hath no part in all this glorious work: The hand that built the firmament hath heaved And smoothed these verdant swells, and sown their slopes With herbage, planted them with island groves, And hedged them round with forests.
PÓgina 172 - These are the gardens of the Desert, these The unshorn fields, boundless and beautiful, For which the speech of England has no name — The Prairies. I behold them for the first, ; And my heart swells, while the dilated sight Takes in the encircling vastness.
PÓgina 239 - This Dictionary is admirable. The etymological part especially is good and sound. . . . The work deserves a place in every English school, whether boys
PÓgina 172 - Breezes of the South, Who toss the golden and the flame-like flowers, And pass the prairie-hawk that, poised on high, Flaps his broad wings, yet moves not, ye have played Among the palms of Mexico and vines Of Texas, and have crisped the limpid brooks That from the fountains of Sonora glide Into the calm Pacific: have ye fanned A nobler or a lovelier scene than this?
PÓgina 173 - And birds, that scarce have learned the fear of man, Are here, and sliding reptiles of the ground, Startlingly beautiful. The graceful deer Bounds to the wood at my approach. The bee...

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