Imatges de pÓgina
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21. On good breeding,

Page.

Chesterfield, 77

22. Address to a young student,

23. Advantages of, and motives to cheerful-

Knox, 80

ness,

Spectator, 82-

SECTION II.

1. The bad reader,

Percival's Tales,

87

2. Respect due to old age,

Spectator,

88

4. Modesty and docility,

3. Piety to God recommended to the young, Blair,

5. Sincerity,

88

ib.

89

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6. Benevolence and humanity,

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11. Needle work recommended to the Ladies, ib.

13. Journal of the life of Alexander Severus, Gibbon, 101

12. On pride,

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adherence to truth,

2. Impertinence in discourse,

3. Character of Addison as a writer, Johnson, 116

4. Pleasure and pain,

5. Sir Roger de Coverly's family,

Percival's Tales, 115
Theophrastus, 115

Spectator, 117,

Aitkin, 121

6 The folly of inconsistent expectations,
7. Description of the vale of Keswick in
Cumberland,

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ib.

118

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13. The combat of the Horatii and the
Curiatii,

14. On the power of custom,
15. On pedantry,

16. The journey of a day; a picture of
human life,

Page.

Livy, 136
Spectator, 138
Mirror, 140

Rambler, 143.

SECTION IV.

1. Description of the amphitheatre of

Titus,

2. Reflections on Westminister abbey,
3. The character of Mary, queen of

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Gibbon, 147
Spectator, 148

Robertson, 150
Hume, 152

Robertson, 154

9. The absent man,

10. The monk,

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Price, 157
Harris, 158

Theophrastus, 160

Spectator, 161
Sterne, 163.
Spectator, 165.,
ib. 168

Sterne, 171

14. Story of the Siege of Calais, Fool of Quality, 171

SECTION V...

1. On grace in writing,

Fitzsborne's Letters, 176.
Spectator, 177

2. On the structure of animals,

3. On natural and fantastical pleasures, Guardian, 180.

4. The folly and madness of ambition.

illustrated,

5. Battle of Pharsalia, and death of

Pompey,

6. Character of king Alfred,.

7. Awkardness in company,

8. Virtue, man's highest interest,

9. On the pleasure arising from objects

of sight,

10. Liberty and slavery,,

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5. The painter who pleased nobody and
every body,

6. Diversity in the human character,

7. The toilet,

8. The hermit,

9. On the death of Mrs. Mason,

10. Extract from the temple of fame,
11. A panegyric on Great Britain,
12. Hymn to the Deity, on the seasons
of the year,

Gay, 211
Smollet, 213
Spectator, 218

Goldsmith, 214

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3. Description of a country ale house,
4. Character of a country schoolmaster,
5. Story of Palemon and Lavinia,
6. Celadon and Amelia,

SECTION VII.

1. The camelion,

Merrick, 233

2. On the order of nature,

Pope, 234

Goldsmith, 235

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Thomson, 237
ib. 240

Shakespeare, 241

Young, 242
Milton, 243

7. Description of Mab, queen of the

fairies,

8. On the existence of a Deity,
9. Evening in paradise described,

10. Elegy written in a country churchyard, Gray, 245

11. Scipio restoring the captive lady to her

lover,

Thomson, 248

12. Humorous complaint to Dr. Arbuthnot of

the impertinence of scribblers,

18. Hymn to adversity,

14. The passions. An ode,

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SECTION VIII.

1. Lamentation for the loss of sight,
2. L'Allegro, or the merry man,
3. On the pursuits of mankind,
4. Adam and Eve's morning hymn,
5. Parting of Hector and Andromache,
6. Facetious history of John Gilpin,
7. The creation of the world,
8. Overthrow of the rebel angels,
9. Alexander's feast, or the power of
music,

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PART II.-LESSONS IN SPEAKING.

SECTION I.

ELOQUENCE OF THE PULPIT.

2. On doing as we would be done unto, Atterbury, 280

1. On truth and integrity,

3. On benevolence and charity,

4. On happiness,

5. On the death of Christ,

SECTION II.

Tillotson, 278

Seed, 282

Sterne, 284

Blair, 288

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1. Pleadings of Cicero against Verres,
2. Cicero for Milo,

292

297

301

304

SECTION IV.

SPEECHES ON VARIOUS SUBJECTS.

1. Romulus to the people of Rome, after build-
ing the city,

2. Hannibal to Scipio Africanus,

3. Scipio's reply,

4. Calisthenes' reproof of Cleon's flattery to
Alexander,

5. Caius Marius to the Romans,

6. Publius Scipio to the Roman army,
7. Hannibal to the Carthagenian army,
8. Adherbal to the Roman senators,
9. Canuleius to the Roman consuls,
10. Junius Brutus over the dead body of

Lucretia,

11. Demosthenes to the Athenians,
12. Jupiter to the inferiour deities,
13. Eneas to queen Dido,

Page.

Hooke, 310
ib. 311

ib. 312

Q. Curtius, 313
Hooke, 313
ib. 316

ib. 319
Sallust, 821
Hooke, 324

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Lansdown, 328

Homer, 333

Virgil, 334

Milton, 336

15. Speech of Belial, advising peace,

ib. 337

14. Moloch to the infernal powers,

SECTION V.

DRAMATIC PIECES.-I.-DIALOGUES.

West Indian, 340

2. Lady Townly and Lady Grace, Provoked Husband, 342

1. Belcour and Stockwell,

3. Priuli and Jaffier,

4. Boniface and Ainwell,

5. Lovegold and Lappet,

Venice Preserved, 346.

Beaux Stratagem, 348
Miser, 351

6. Cardinal Wolsey and Cromwell, Henry, VIII, 354

7. Sir Charles and Lady Racket,

Three weeks afer Marriage, 357
8. Brutus and Cassius, Shakespeare's Julius Cesar, 361

II. SPEECHES AND SOLILOQUIES.

1. Hamlet's advice to the players,

Tragedy of Hamlet, 364
2. Douglas' account of himself, Tragedy of Douglas, 365,

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