Imatges de pÓgina
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THE NEW YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY

160886
ASTOR, LENOX AND
TILOBA FOUNDATION,

1899.

RHODE-ISLAND DISTRICT, ac.

Be it remembered, that on this fourth day of June, in PSEAL.X the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and

>>> twenty eight, and in the fifty-second year of the Independence of the United States of America, Jonathan Barber, of said District, eposited in this office, the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor in the following words, viz.

“ Exercises in Reading and Recitations, selected for the use of Classes, by Dr. Jonathan Barber, Second Edition.” In conformity to an act of Congress of the United States of America, entitled “an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned :” and also to an act entitled “ an act supplementary to an act entitled an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits there of, to the arts of designing, engraving and etching, historical and other prints. Witness ;

BENJAMIN COWELL,
Clerk of Rhode Island District.

EXERCISES IN ELOCUTION.

THE HERMIT.

BEATTIE.

At the close of the day, when the hamlet is still,
And mortals the sweets of forgetfulness prove,
When nought but the torrent is heard on the hill,
And nought but the nightingale's song in the grove;
It was thus, by the cave of the mountain afar,
While his harp rung symphonious, a hermit began;
No more with himself, or with nature at war,
He thought as a sage, tho' he felt as a man.
“Ah why, all abandon'd to darkness and wo,
Why, lone Philomela, that languishing fall?
For spring shall return, and a lover bestow,
And sorrow no longer thy bosom enthral.
But, if pity inspire thee, renew the sad lay;
Mourn, sweetest complainer, man calls thee to mourn;
O sooth him, whose pleasures, like thine pass away;
Full quickly they pass:—but they never return.
“Now gliding remote, on the verge of the sky,
The moon, half extinguished, her crescent displays;
But lately I marked, when majestic on high,
She shone, and the planets were lost in the blaze.
Roll on, thou fair orb, and with gladness pursue
The path that conducts thee to splendour again.
But man's faded glory, what change shall renew?
Ah fool! to exult in a glory so vain !
“ Tis night, and the landscape is lovely no more;
I mourn, but ye woodlands, I mourn not for you;
For in is approaching, your charms to restore,
i

th fresh fragrance, and glittering with dew.
je ravage of winter I mourn;
he embryo blossom will save ;
Spring visit the mouldering urn!

dawn on the night of the grave !"

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