Imatges de pÓgina
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principles of human nature, while I have not scrupled to innovate upon their combinations. The Iliad, the tragic poetry of Greece --Shakespeare, in the Tempest and Midsummer Night's Dream,--and most especially Milton, in Paradise Lost, conform to this rule; and the most humble novelist, who seeks to confer or receive amusement from his labours, may, without presumption, apply to prose fiction a licence, or rather a rule, from the adoption of which so many exquisite combinations of human feeling have resulted in the highest specimens of poetry.

be regretted. I passed the summer of 1816 in the environs of Geneva. The season was cold and rainy, and in the evenings we crowded around a blazing wood fire, and occasionally amused ourselves with some German stories of ghosts, which happened to fall into our hands. These tales excited in us a playful desire of imitation. Two other friends (a tale from the

pen

of one of whom would be far more acceptable to the public than any thing I can ever hope to produce) and myself agreed to write each a story, founded on some supernatural occurrence.

The weather, however, suddenly became serene; and my two friends left me on a journey among

the Alps, and lost, in the magnificent scenes which they present, all memory of their ghostly visions. The following tale is the only one which has been completed.

FRANKENSTEIN;

OR,

THE MODERN PROMETHEUS.

LETTER I.

To Mrs. SAVILLE, England.

St. Petersburgh, Dec. 11th, 17—. You will rejoice to bear that no disaster has accompanied the commencement of an enterprise which you have regarded with such evil forebodings. I arrived here yesterday; and my first task is to assure my dear sister of my welfare, and increasing confidence in the success of my undertaking

I am already far north of London ; and as I walk in the streets of Peters

VOL. I.

B

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