Imatges de pàgina
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Poems by George Canning

296

Il Penferoso. A Rhapsody

ibid
Fugitive Pieces. By a Poor Poet

ibid

• The Veftry. A Poem

297

A Monody on the Death of the Marquis of Tavistock ibid

Ode to the E-l of Chm

ibid

Half an Hour's Advice to Nobody knows who

The Trial of England's Cicero

299

View of all the Changes in Government, &c.

ibid

Scheme for reducing the National Debt, &c.

ibid

Address to the Freeholders of the County of Huntingdon ibid

A Letter to the Proprietors of East India Stock, &c.

Another Letter to the Proprietors of East India Stock, &c, 301

A Defence of Mr. Sullivan's Propofitions

302

Debates in the Asiatic Assembly

ibid

The Nature of a Quarantine

304

An Enquiry into the Causes of the high Price of Provisions 305

The Farmer's Letters

306

The Occasion of the Dearness of Provisions, &c.

307

An Enquiry into the Means of preserving the public Roads 308

Confiderations upon the intended navigable Communication be-
tween the Friths of Forth and Clyde

ibid

An Essay on perfecting the fine Arts in Great Britain, &c. ib.

Hibernia Curiosa

-399

Historical Memoirs of the Irish Rebellion, in the Year 1641 310

Great Events from little Causes :

ibid.

Modern Gallantry display'd

311

The Cries of Blood, or Juryman's Monitor

ibid

Proceedings of the Court Martial on capt. Douglas, &c. ibid

An Effay on the Opera, written in Italian by Count Algarotti 313

The Theatrical Campaign for 1766 and 1767

314

Lettre contre la Raison

ibid

A Letter to the Author of a Letter to Dr. Formey, &c. 315

A Letter to Dr. Rutherforth, Archdeacon of Essex, &c.

316

The Happy Life: or, the Contented Man

ibid

The Stage the high Road to Hell

Keeling's Sermons on Moses's Petition, &c.

319

A Sermon on the Death of the Marquis of Tavistock ibid

Swinney's Sermon

Payne's Introduction to Geometry:

ibid

Ananas; or a Treatise on the Pine-Apple

ibid

Inquiry into the Principles of Political economy.

32.1

Priestley's History of the present State of Electricity 329

Biffet's Medical Eflays and Observations

Ducarel's Anglo-Norman Antiquities

339

A Critical Differtation on Ifaiah, VII, 13, 14, 15, 16. 349

Lewis's Translation of the Thebaid of Statius

An Effay on Original Genius

368

Remarks

Bernarks on the Conduct and Writings of J. J. Rousseau 374

Familiar Letters between Abraham Hill, Esq. &c.

376

Critical Reflections on the Chara&er of Alexander the Great 382

Dimsdale's Present Method of Inoculating for the Small-Pox 386

Chandler's Effay towards an Investigation of the present Me-

thod of Inoculation

389

Ruston's Effay on Inoculation for the Small:Pox

ibid

Occasional Letters on the Practice of Inoculation

390

Wallis's Tentamen Sophisticon, a Chemical Ellay 391

Stern's Medical Advice to Consumptive People

392

An Eflay on the Bite of a Mad Dog

393

A Letter to his Grace the Dake of Grafton.

ibid

A seventh Letter to the People of England

394

Dr. Williamson's Narrative of the extraordinary Case of a late

- great Commoner

395

Two Papers, on the Subject of taxing the British Colonies ibid

The absolute Neceflity of laying open the Trade to the East.

Indies

ibid

Historical Memoirs of the late Duke of Cumberland :: 396

Hanway's Letters on the Importance of the rising Generation of

the labouring Part of our Fellow-Subjects

397

Letters on the British Museum

ibid

An Addrefs to the Ladies

ibid

A short View of the present State of the Ifle of Man 398

Whịtworth's Scheme for the improvement of the Broad Wheels iba

The Roscius; or Spouters Companion

ibid

The Concubine : a Poem

ibid

Philodamus. A Tragedy -...

399

Genius : a poetical Epistle

ibid

Verses on a Picture of the Archbishop of Armagh 400

Letters from the Countess de Sancerre, to the Count de Nancé ib.

An Address to the People of England on the Corruption of

the Times

ibid

A View of the Trinity in the Glass of Divine Revelation ibid

An Inquiry, Historical and Critical, into the Evidence against

Mary Queen of Scots

401

Goldsmith's Beauties of English Poesy

408

Steuart's Inquiry into the Principles of Political Oeconomy 4u

Voltaire's Ignorant Philosopher

Hanbury's History of the Charitable Foundations at Church-

Langton

419

Clio: or, a Discourse on Taste

422

Free and Candid Disquisitions, &c. Part the Firft

424

Memoirs of the Court of Portugal, &c.

Annual Register for the Year 1766

43%

Mrs. Pennington's Letters. Vol. III, and IV.

Ferguson's Tables and Tracts

439

The Nautical Almanac for the Year 1767

441

Crito,

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5.458

Crito, or, Essays on various Subjects. Vol. II. and Laft 444
Chappelow's fix Affemblies

448 Elay on the Diseases most fatal to Infants

450 Saunders's Translation of Plenck's new and easy Method of ;- giving Mercury to those afflicted with the Venereal. Disease Morley's Effay on the Nature and Cure of the King's Evil 453Obfervations on Specific Medicines, &c.

454 Schultz’s Account of Inoculation for the Small-Pox ib. Bochanan's Regular English Syntax

ib. Historical Essays upon Paris

456 Voyage round the World in his Majesty's Ship the Dolphin, - commanded by the Hon. Commodore Byron

ib. Abbé Coyer's Letter to Dr. Maty concerning the Patagonians

557 Apper.dix to Dr. Swift's Works

ib. A fhort View of the-Laws now subfifting with respect to the Powers of the East-India Company to borrow Money

itib. An Address to the Publick on the subject of the Eaft-India i Dividend

1

458 A Letter to a Member of Parliament concerning the Effeets of Popery on the Price of Provifions ...

ib, The Rise and Progress of the present Taste in Planting Parks, Pleasure-Grounds, Gardens, &c.

460 Le Pour et le Contre.

461 Origin of the Newcastle Burr

462 Dorval; or the Test of Virtue

463 Hiftory of Mrs. Drayton and her two Daughters

ib. The Cruel Disappointment; or, the History of Miss Einmeline Merrick

464 Penn's Farmer's Daughter of Essex

ib. The Woman of Fashion: or, the History of Lady Diana Doro

465 A Letter to the Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of Od ib

A Defence of Strictures on Dr. Iowth, respecting Liberty 467
Address to the Clergy concerning their Departure from the
Doctrines of the Reformation

468 Alarm to all the Protestants of Great-Britain and Ireland 469

ib.
Warning against Popish Do&trines
Cooper's Discourse concerning the Opinions and Errors of the
Church of Rome

476 Lee's Free Enquiry into the Meaning of the most excellent Name of Jesus

ib.

ib. The Doctrines of the Trinity and Satisfaction The Double Question discussed

471 Hart's Importance of the Word of God Another High Road to Hell

QSA

mer

474

P R E F A CE

TO THE

TWENTY-THIRD VOLUME

OF THE

CRITICAL REVIEW.

A

S the Authors of the Critical Review feldom solicit an audience from the Public

on their own account, they hope to meet with indulgence on the present occafion.

It has been remarked, “That the highest character a judge can acquire, is that of pleasing both parties, or neither. The truth of this observation the Critical Reviewers lately experienced; having perceived, from several anonymous publications, that their impartiality has excited a kind of jealousy between the Dunces of England and Scotland, which terminates in each party abusing the Critical Review,

The authors of this work took an early opportunity of declaring, " That they never pretended to infallibility in criticism, or presumed

A

to decide with dogmatical authority : they have delivered their sentiments as opinions only, supported with reasons, on which every reader may exercise șiş own understanding.’---They Aatter themselves with having generally acted in 'strict conformity to those professions : though they consider it as a misfortune inseparable from the nature of their undertaking, if their observations have disgusted a few persons of real genius; but must, at the same time, declare, that they have been always open to conviction, reproof, and information.

They are inclined to think, that if they had not endeavoured to discourage that destructive antipathy which political prejudices had raised in England against the inhabitants of NorthBritain, it would have been impollible for their most inveterate enemy to charge the Critical Reviewers with forming a Scotch conspiracy to depreciate English literature ; especially as many instances might be produced in which they have treated the writers of that country very freely, and even declared *, 'It is å melancholy truth, that every idle Scotchman who will not, or cannot earn his bread by the em ployment in which he was brought up, commencès author, and undertakes to translate books into a language of which he is entirely igno, rant. See Number I. page 81,

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