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and the blowing of horns form part of the prince was naturally averse from war,” to ritual. There is some account of this old which the author appends the note, “ Averse custom in my 'Manley and Corringham and aversion require to after them rather than Glossary. See also the late Sir Charles from ; but both are used, and sometimes even Anderson's 'Lincoln Pocket Guide,' p. 17; by the same author.” Now, the student who Marshall's 'East Yorkshire Words,' vol. i. uses this book-evidently an authoritative p. 39; Elworthy's 'West Somerset Word- guide if numerous editions have a meaning, Book,' p. 674; Dawson’s ‘History of Skipton,' will conclude that“ averse to” is correct and p. 295 ; and ‘N. & Q.,'7th S. iii. 367.

proper, and “averse from an aberration, if EDWARD PEACOCK. not a blunder. Yet, in the face of this, an "REST, BUT DO NOT LOITER” (8th S. xii. 244, upholder of “the generally accepted rules of 318, 332). -- As a sort of parallel to the above, grammar” warns his readers against “averse I may, perhaps, quote the injunction to per- to," which he unhesitatingly pillories as one sons availing themselves of a drinking foun- of three glaring absurdities in syntax. This tain attached to the General Post Office in state of matters must be painfully disconNew York—at least, I copied it from there certing to the “ thoughtful and conscientious in the blazing sun of July, 1880 :

reader” who has already figured in this dis“Keep cool and good-natured,

cussion. It may comfort him to learn from Take your turn,

the 'Encyclopædic Dictionary, with approThe line forms this way.”

priate examples, that Mr. Lennie -- conThis legend impressed me the more because sciously or not – is historically defensible. some of my American friends had scoffed at While etymology would demand from, modern our railway-station cautions " and

practice prefers to. And so an end. ings,” as only suitable for babes and sucklings.

THOMAS BAYNE, JAMES HOOPER.

Helensburgh, N.B. CONSTRUCTION WITH A PARTITIVE (8th S. xii. 206, 312, 411, 477, 517).-But for an assured

Miscellaneous. dictum at the last reference, this subject might now have been let alone as quite suffi- First Steps in Anglo-Saxon. By Henry Sweet, Ph.D.

NOTES ON BOOKS, &c. ciently discussed. On the question, however, as to whether the humble inquirer is to be We have reason to feel grateful when an acknow.

(Oxford, Clarendon Press.) guided by the practice of distinguished ledged master in any branch of knowledge conwriters or the rules of grammar-books, we descends to the low estate of the tyro, and provides now learn that the proper course is "to follow leading-strings to guide his unaccustomed steps. the generally accepted rules of grammar as

If the beginner in Anglo-Saxon does not soon learn closely as possible." Then comes this philo- Dr. Sweet, who now improves upon his “Anglo

to run alone, the blame certainly does not rest with sophical distinction, with implied thoughtful Saxon Primer' by issuing a still more elementary caution:

manual of a less concise and abstract nature. All “Whatever may be the case as regards the con

the more scientific considerations of mutation, grastruction of sentences, we ought certainly to be dation, and the like are here allowed to stand over careful of the meanings of words, and this of itself for the present, and it is only the absolutely essenshould guard us against such constructions as

tial and practical part of the grammar that is different to, averse to,''neither of them are.

insisted upon. In ? First Steps in Anglo-Saxon. In “averse to” we have a new item for minimum of syntactical details forced upon his

the learner is encouraged to proceed by having a consideration. The writer guards us against attention, and in this way he is to a large extent the use of it, after having dwelt on the im-enabled, in George Eliot's phrase, “to get at the portance of grammatical rules. Now, there marrow of the language independently

of the bones.” is at hand a grammar, by William Lennie, on selected certain passages from Beda’s ‘Astronomy;' which many learners must have been reared, the Colloquy' of Ælfric, and the 'Beowulf,' and in seeing that its title-page bears that it is in order to render these more suitable for his purpose its ninety-third edition, improved” (Oliver he has submitted them to a process of normalization & Boyd, 1894). This work is entitled "The and paraphrase which we do not greatly like. Ali Principles of English Grammar,......with that can be said is that the end justifies the means. Copious Exercises in Parsing and Syntax '; Handbook to Thornton Abbey. By J. R. Boyle, and the thirty-second of its syntactical rules, F.S.A. (Andrews.) given on p. 113, asserts that certain words MR. BOYLE has performed a useful and interesting and phrases must be followed with appro- piece of work in writing this little guide-book to priate prepositions ; such be"--and in the one of the only two Lincolnshire abbeys (Croyland appended list is “

being the other) which at all repay a pilgrimage. averse to." On p: 115, It is sufficiently illustrated,

and contains (besides a among sentences to be corrected, is, * This history and description of the buildings of the

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abbey) a succinct account of the Augustinian rule. and lets some light upon what seem to have been Those who want more will find it in the admirable his religious convictions. Under the title of The volume, recently edited by Mr. J. W. Clark, on Prisoners of the Gods,' Mr. W. B. Yeats deals with Barnwell Priory. Little remains of the former Celtic views as to ghosts.

Mr. Prothero gives beauty of the ecclesiastical buildings at Thornton; some very readable and suggestive pictures of The but of domestic work, the splendid gate-house-Childhood and School Life of Byron.' - Almost as conjectured, with some reason, to be the abbot's interested as England has of late been in her lodging (in 1382 a licence was granted “de nova heroes, naval and military, appear to be the domo desuper et juxta portam Abbatiæ Kernel- Americans: the Century opens with a paper by landâ ”)—is an early and fine specimen of Perpen: Mr. Paul Leicester Ford concerning ‘Portraits of dicular brickwork. Curiously enough, the name of General Wolfe. Most of them, we are told, are “college” clings to the abbey still, although its spurious. When Wolfe sprang at a bound to repurefoundation by Henry VIII. only lasted for six tation, the printsellers turned into portraits of years. It is now in the liberal hands of the Earl Wolfe yamped-up prints of men who had lapsed into of Yarborough. We hope Mr. Boyle will be en- obscurity. Five portraits, including one by Gainscouraged in his project of publishing the chronicle borough, are reproduced. Of these the most striking of the abbey, to which he alludes in his preface. is a profile from the National Portrait Gallery.

French Wives and Mothers' purifies FrenchIn the Fortnightly Mr, Arthur Symons deals with women from the aspersion cast on them by Parisian The Problem of Gérard de Nerval' without aiding journalists and novelists. It has some good pictures very greatly towards its solution. There is, in of French social life. Mr. Leonard Huxley contrifact, no solution except madness. Those who read butes a description of his father's home life. 'Rethe stories contained in his strangely misnamed collections of Washington and his Friends' may be Filles du Feu,' which include his masterpiece, read with much pleasure. The Mysterious City •Sylvie, and others on which his reputation subsists, of Honduras’ will interest the antiquary.

--Scribner's will find there, even, how his thoughts continually opens with what promises to be a highly interesting brood upon suicide. Nerval has, however, an in- Story of the [American) Revolution, by Mr. Henry teresting individuality, and the story of his loves Cabot Lodge. The first instalment depicts only the and his fate would bear retelling. Mr. Gilbert first blow, and ends with the fights of Lexington Coleridge has a short and interesting paper on My and Concord. The illustrations generally are of Friend Robin,' the most of a gentleman of all birds, much interest. Curiously enough, the next article, in singing whose praise man will never weary. His of which also a portion only, is given, 'Red Rock, song constitutes at this time the charm of our deals with the next most important step in the green lanes near London, and his bright, gallant history of democracy--the beginning of the war of form may, with some observation, be descried secession. * In the Chestnut Groves of Northern among the briar leaves which his coat exactly Italy'is profusely and well illustrated.

'A French matches in colour. Mr. Percy Osborn gives some Literary Circle depicts the “Garret” of Gongood translations from Philostratus. M. A. Filon court, and has portraits of both the Goncourts, continues his communications concerning the modern Daudet and Madame Daudet, Octave Mirbeau, the French drama, and deals with the work of M. Jules Princesse Mathilde, Flaubert, Zola, and other celeLemaître, M. Brieux, the author of the crowned brities. The frontispiece to the Páll Mall consists play 'L'Evasion,' M. Henri Lavedan, and others. of an engraving of C. W. Cope's pretty if convenCacoethes Literarum' attributes to the French tional picture of 'L'Allegro.' Osterley Park,' with educational system the worship of literature which its treasures, is, with the aid of photographs, depicted is a striking feature of modern French life. From by Lady Jersey. Sir Walter Besant has begun a 1820 to 1850, holds M. Bastide, the writer, the pre- series of papers on South London, which shall do valent form of literature in France was poetry, at for transpontine London what he has done for Lon. the present moment it is criticism.-Among the don and Westminster. Sir Martin Conway defew non-controversial articles in the Nineteenth scribes brilliantly The First Crossing of SpitsCentury is one by Sir Algernon West, entitled 'Abergen.' Mr. Schooling gives the first of a series of Walk through Deserted London.' This is interest- illustrated articles on The Great Seal.' Judge ing as including recollections, but has some rather Morris tells in vivacious fashion the story of The strange errors, the most curious of which is speaking Campaign of the Nile.' • The Largest Church of of the Juliet of Miss O'Neal (sic). Dr. Jessopp has an Olden Times’ is old St. Paul's.- Sir John Moore at article, in his well-known and most gossiping, style, Corunna,' in the Cornhill, is by the Rev. W. H. on Parish Life in England before the Great Pillage.' Fitchett, the author of a series of 'Fights for the The property belonging to the parishes during the Flag, contributed to Australian periodicals, and centuries before the great spoliation under Henry now in course of reprinting. The story of heroism VIII. was, we are told, enormous, and was always is vigorously told. Mr. Stephen Phillips under. growing. The church, too, was the property of the takes the defence of The Poetry of Byron,' is very parish. We are bidden to get rid of the notion that much in earnest, and says some good things, but is either the monks or the landed gentry built our not wholly convincing. Mr. Charles Bright depicts churches. What we now call squires did not then some Ancient Methods of Signalling.' Miss Elizaexist, and the monastic bodies were almost, from beth Lee has an excellent paper entitled A Literary one point of view, nonconformists. “The parishes Friendship, presenting the friendship between built the churches, and the parishes in all cases Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Miss Mitford. kept them under repair.” Very, brilliant, if a little The story of Madame Lafargue is told afresh. - In too brightly coloured, are the pictures Dr. Jessopp Temple Bar the stirring and heroic career of Lally gives us of life in this period. It was called “Merry Tollendhal is narrated. ‘Alas, poor Fido !' deals England," but it seems to have been less merry with the fidelity of dogs and the tears that have than it is thought. Mr. Thomas Arnold gives a been spent upon them. Poetry and Pipes' contains very interesting account of Arthur Hugh Člough, some criticism in the shape of a species of discussion

between a tutor and pupils. -Mr. Charles Whibley, Mr. Daniel Stock and Mr. T. G. Doughty. We writing in Macmillan's on Burns, maintains tho should like to see an extension of such societies to view advocated by Messrs. Henley and Henderson, other districts. that it is only in the vernacular that the poet is at his best, and that he handles English with the We have learnt from the North Devon Herald, uncertainty of a scholar expressing himself in with much regret, of the death of the Rev. John Ovidian Latin or Thucydidean Greek. Mr. Hadden Ingle Dredge, Vicar of Buckland Brewer, one of describes some friends of Browning, among whom our oldest contributors. His name appears in the we find, not without surprise, mention of Cole- first volume of the First Series, and is pleasantly ridge and Lamb. 'An Episode in the History conspicuous until the close of the Sixth, after which of the Comédie Française describes the heroic its appearance is less frequent. Born in Edinsuppression during the Terror by Labussière, an burgh 10 June, 1818, Mr. Dredge was brought up as actor, of some of the pièces accusatives against a printer, became a Wesleyan minister, joined the criminals such as Fleury, Vanhove, Molé, and hun; Church of England, and was ordained by the Bishop dreds of others. In the Land of the White Poppy of Chester deacon in 1868, priest in 1869. After holdis pleasant reading. Of The French Invasion of ing curacies between 1868 and 1873 at Warrington, Ireland' the first part is supplied. ---Mr. W. J. Liverpool, Seaforth, and St. Helens, he was preLawrence describes in the Gentleman's ‘A Shake- sented in 1874 by Mr. Gladstone, then Premier, spearian Pantomime. Mr. James Sykes supplies whose political opponent he was, to the living of the origin of 'Some Famous Political Phrases 'after which he died possessed. He was the chief authowhich we are frequently asked. The Veddahs of rity on Devonshire and Cheshire bibliography and Ceylon are described. Some Fatal Books,' by the genealogy, and had an almost unrivalled acquaintRev. P. H. Ditchfield, does not pretend to com- ance with Puritan theology. His works include pleteness. We note with surprise the absence of Five Sheaves of Devon Bibliography, The Bookany mention of Dolet.-Very attractive are, as sellers and Printers of the Seventeenth and Eighusual, the contents of the English Illustrated, in teenth Centuries, "The Marwood List of Briefs, which we commend to antiquaries and folk-lorists 1714-1744,' 'An Account of Frithelstock Priory, the account of 'Booty from Benin' and that of many biographies, contributions to the Devonshire * Regimental Pets. The illustrations to the former Association, &c. We recommend our readers to turn article are very interesting and quaint. Vatican to what is said under the heading ‘Nonjurors of the and Quirinal' is also a fair and admirably illus- Eighteenth Century,'gth S. xi. 52, by Mr. T. Cann trated paper. -Mr. Austin Dobson describes in Hughes, M.A., who speaks of him as “a grand old Longman's, under the title of The Author of Mon- man,” and probably the oldest living contributor of sieur Tonson, John

Taylor, known

as the Chevalier ‘N. & Q." Taylor. Mr. A. M. Bell tells ‘The Tale of the Flint,' or in other words describes the discovery and the significance of flint arrow - heads. Mr. Lang, in

Notices to Correspondents. At the Sign of the Ship,' makes light of Mr. Butler's 'Authoress of the Odyssey.' The Story of the

We must call special attention to the following “Donna”) is retold.- Not one, but two articles notices :on subjects other than fiction appear in Chapman's. On all communications must be written the name One is Notes of a Playgoer,' occupied with Mr. and address of the sender, not necessarily for pubForbes Robertson's Hamlet, the second a transla- lication, but as a guarantee of good faith. tion of Madame C. Joubert's excellent Recollec

We cannot undertake to answer queries privately. tions of Heine.'

To secure insertion of communications corre. IN Part LII. of Cassell's Gazetteer, Steeping to spondents must observe the following rule. Let Stutton, the most important article is that on each note, query, or reply be written on a separate Stirling, of the castle of which a view is given. slip of paper, with the signature of the writer and Stockport and Stockton-on-Tees are also described, such address as he wishes to appear. Correspondas are the various Stokes, Stonehenge, and Stony ents who repeat queries are requested to head the Stratford, Stow in the Wold, and Stratford-on second communication “Duplicate.” Avon.

OSMOND DICKENSON (“Buried in Woollen ”).-See We have received the Christmas number of the N. & G.,' 4th S. i. 543; ii

. 345; ix. 218, 284; 'xi. 42, Scots Pictorial, with an account of the ceremony in London."

84; 5th S. vi. 288; 7th S. xi. 224, 333, 8. v. “Funerals known as “The Burning of the Clavie, and some lively pictures of 'The Roaring Game, otherwise J. C. P. (“ Edition of Homer, Amsterdam, 1707"). curling

-The two volumes of this edition fifty years ago

fetched something less than a dozen shillings. A We congratulate the Upper Norwood Athenæum single volume nowadays has no appraisable value. on attaining, its majority. Started twenty-one

CORRIGENDUM.—8th S. xii. 517, col. 2, I. 19, for years ago, it has done useful work among its mem

“Viney” read Vincy. bers, and we have read the Record just published with much interest. During the summer months the members devote Saturday afternoons to the visit. Editorial Communications should be addressed to ing of places of historical interest. Papers are read, “The Editor of 'Notes and Queries'"- Advertiseand much valuable information obtained. The ments and Business Letters to “The Publisher" Records are illustrated, and are edited by Mr. J. at the Office, Bream's Buildings, Chancery Lane, Stanley and Mr. W. F. Harradence. The present E.C. number contains a history of the society, written We beg leave to state that we decline to return by Mr. Charles Quilter. The President is the Rev. communications which, for any reason, we do not Lord Victor A. Seymour, the Vice-Presidents being print; and to this rule we can make no exception.

NOTICE.

JANUARY, 1898.

H 0 US E HOLD W OR DS.

Founded by CHARLES DICKENS.

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AND THE FOLLOWING PAPERS.

COMPLETE STORIES:

AHASUERUS.

SPOT.
HIS TROUBLESOME LEGACY.

The ENEMY'S COUNTRY.
MISS NORMAN'S FORTUNE.

The ORGANIST of ST. ETHELBERT'S.
OUR NEW BUTLER.
SOME NEW THING.

TWO WOMEN.

ALSO THE FOLLOWING ARTICLES :-

A FAMOUS BRITISH EXPLORER.

NEW SONGS and MUSIC.
A USEFUL MICROBE.

OLD-TIME WEDDINGS.
BELLS, ANCIENT and MODERN.

REMARKABLE PREDICTIONS.
BIG FAMILIES.

RUSTIC RETRIBUTION.

SOME SIGNS and OMENS.
BRODERIE TOURAINE.

SUCCESSFUL NIGHTS of FAMOUS
CHANCE,

PLAYBRS.
FASHIONS.

The COMING MAN.
HOUSEHOLD GARDENING.

The FAMILY DOCTOR: Preventive Nursing.
HOW the QUEEN SPENDS CHRISTMAS. The INFLUENCE of WEATHER.
INDIVIDUALITY in OUR ROOMS.

The TABLE : The Place of Fat in Nutrition,
JOTTINGS in SEVEN DIALS.

UNCONSCIOUS PESSIMISTS.

LONDON: 12, ST. BRIDE STREET, LUDGATE CIRCUS, E.C.

A SELECTION OF BOOKS ON NATURAL HISTORY, SPORT, ETC., W. H.

S ON,

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Printed by JOHN EDWARD FRANCIB, Athenaeum Press. Bream's Buildings, Chancery Lane, E.C.: and Published by

JOHN C. FRANCIS at Bream's Buildings, Chancery Lane, E.C. - Saturday, January 8, 1898.

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