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I did receive fair speechless messages :
Her name is Portia; nothing undervalued
To Cato's daughter, Brutus' Portia.

Nor is the wide world ignorant of her worth;
For the four winds blow in from every coast
Renowned suitors: and her sunny locks
Hang on her temples like a golden fleece;
Which makes her seat of Belmont, Colchos'
strand,

And many Jasons come in quest of her.
O my Antonio, had I but the means
To hold a rival place with one of them,
I have a mind presages me such thrift,
That I should questionless be fortunate.

ANT. Thou know'st, that all my fortunes are
at sea;

Nor have I money, nor commodity

To raise a present sum: therefore go forth,
Try what my credit can in Venice do;
That shall be rack'd, even to the uttermost,
To furnish thee to Belmont, to fair Portia.
Go, presently inquire, and so will I,
Where money is; and I no question make,
To have it of my trust, or for my sake.

MERCHANT OF VENICE, A. 1, s. 1.

A NOBLE NATURE AT WAR WITH ARTIFICE.

TIMON. Uncover, dogs, and lap.

[The dishes uncovered, are full of warm water. Some speak. What does his lordship mean? Some other. I know not.

TIM. May you a better feast never behold,

You knot of mouth-friends! smoke, and lukewarm water

Is your perfection. This is Timon's last;
Who stuck and spangled you with flatteries,
Washes it off, and sprinkles in your faces

[Throwing water in their faces. Your reeking villainy. Live loath'd, and long, Most smiling, smooth, detested parasites, Courteous destroyers, affable wolves, meek bears, You fools of fortune, trencher-friends, time's flies, Cap and knee slaves, vapours, and minute-jacks! Of man, and beast, the infinite malady

Crust you quite o'er!-What, dost thou go? Soft, take thy physick first-thou too,-and thou:

[Throws the dishes at them, and drives them out.
Stay, I will lend thee money, borrow none.—
What, all in motion? Henceforth be no feast,
Whereat a villain's not a welcome guest.
Burn, house; sink, Athens! henceforth hated be
Of Timon, man, and all humanity.

TIMON OF ATHENS, A. 3, s. 6.

A NOBLE NATURE GONE ASTRAY.

Ir grieves many:

The gentleman is learned, and a most rare speaker, To nature none more bound; his training such, That he may furnish and instruct great teachers, And never seek for aid out of himself.

Yet see

When these so noble benefits shall prove

Not well dispos'd, the mind growing once corrupt, They turn to vicious forms, ten times more ugly

Than ever they were fair. This man so complete,
Who was enroll'd 'mongst wonders, and when we,
Almost with ravish'd list'ning, could not find
His hour of speech a minute, he, my lady,
Hath into monstrous habits put the graces
That once were his, and is become as black
As if besmear'd in hell.

K. HENRY VIII., A. 1, s. 2.

A TRUCE IN THE HEROIC AGE.

WORTHY of arms! as welcome as to one
That would be rid of such an enemy;

But that's no welcome: Understand more clear What's past, and what's to come, is strew'd with husks

And formless ruin of oblivion

;

But in this extant moment, faith and troth,
Strain'd purely from all hollow bias-drawing,
Bids thee, with most divine integrity,

From heart of very heart, great Hector, welcome.

TROILUS AND CRESSIDA, 4, s. 5.

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A TRUE FRIEND REBUKES WHERE FLATTERERS PRAISE.

TIMON. NOW, Apemantus, if thou wert not sullen, I'd be good to thee.

APEMANTUS.

No, I'll nothing: for

If I should be brib'd too, there would be none

left

To rail upon thee; and then thou would'st sin

the faster.

Thou giv'st so long, Timon, I fear me, thou

Wilt give away thyself in paper shortly:
What need these feasts, pomps, and vain glories?

TIM.

An you begin to rail on society once,

Nay,

I am sworn, not to give regard to you.
Farewell; and come with better musick. [Exit.
APEM.

So ;Thou❜lt not hear me now,-thou shalt not then,

I'll lock

Thy heaven from thee. O, that men's ears should be

To counsel deaf, but not to flattery!

TIMON OF ATHENS, A. 1, s. 2.

A VIRTUOUS WIFE AND SISTER'S OMENS MAY NOT BE DISRE

GARDED.

ANDROMACHE.

When was my lord so much

ungently tempered,

To stop his ears against admonishment?

Unarm, unarm, and do not fight to-day. HECTOR. You train me to offend you; get you in:

By all the everlasting gods, I'll go.

AND. My dreams will, sure, prove ominous to the day.

НЕСТ. No

CAS.

more, I say.

Enter CASSANDRA.

brother Hector?

Where is my

AND. Here, sister; arm'd, and bloody in

intent.

Consort with me in loud and dear petition.

Pursue we him on knees; for I have dream'd

Of bloody turbulence, and this whole night

Hath nothing been but shapes and forms of slaughter.

CAS. O, it is true.

HECT.

Ho! bid

my trumpet sound! CAS. No notes of sally, for the heavens, sweet brother.

HECT. Begone, I say: the gods have heard

me swear.

CAS. The gods are deaf to hot and peevish

VOWS:

They are polluted offerings, more abhorr'd
Than spotted livers in the sacrifice.

AND. O! be persuaded: Do not count it holy To hurt by being just: it is as lawful,

For we would give much, to use violent thefts, And rob in the behalf of charity.

CAS. It is the purpose, that makes strong

the vow:

But vows to every purpose must not hold :
Unarm, sweet Hector.

НЕСТ.
Hold you still, I say.
Mine honour keeps the weather of my fate:
Life every man holds dear; but the dear man
Holds honour far more precious dear than life.

TROILUS AND CRESSIDA, A. 5, s. 2.

ADMIRATION.

SWEET mistress, (what your name is else I know not,

Nor by what wonder you do hit on mine,) Less, in your knowledge, and your grace, you show not,

Than our earth's wonder; more than earth divine.

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