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Question. Was it not necessary that there should be a schedule of quantities, in order that bidders might bid understandingly?

Answer. In my opinion, it was.

Question. Did not the publication of the proposals without a schedule of quantities give an opportunity to those who interpreted the proposals and bids to vary the quantities so as to give the contract to any bidder they saw fit, by requiring larger or smaller stock?

Answer. Undoubtedly it did.

Question. Was it not the duty of the architect to publish such a schedule in order to prevent such favoritism?

Answer. I think it was.
Question. Who was the architect?
Answer. Mr. Young.

Question. Did you compute the buttress caps on south wing of extension ?

Answer. Yes, sir.

Question. How many were there, and how much did you make them amount to under the contract?

Answer. There were two of them. I made them about $35,000 a piece. Question. Explain how you made them reach that amount.

Answer. The width of the stone over three times its thickness is 12 feet 3 inches, adding thereby, under the wording of the contract, $1,225 to the price of the stone computed at ordinary width.

Question. Does not the rule become a monstrosity when thus applied ?

Answer. I think so.

Question. Was not there a bid for all four of the buttress caps, but two being used, for $1,800, or $900 for the two?

Answer. The schedule shows that Hawkes's bid was for that sum.

Question. Did you recommend a man to Mr. Dixon to cut the caps now at Hastings, on the Hudson, embraced in the schedule now exhibited to you, who offered to cut them for $1,000 each?

Answer. A man who cut the caps for the Capitol extension came to me to inquire if he could get the job, offering to cut them for $1,000 each. I think I sent him to Mr. Dixon.

Question. Is Mr. Dixon one of the firm of Larned & Co.?
Answer. Yes, sir.
Question. Is he also one of the firm of Beals & Dixon ?
Answer. Yes, sir.

JULY 2, 1862 Committee met. Present: A. A. Sargent, William Wall, and J. P. Chamberlain.

PETER HAMILTON, being duly sworn and examined, testified:
Question. Where do you reside and what is your business ?
Answer. I reside in Baltimore, and my business is stone-cutter.
Question. Have you had much experience in practical stone cutting ?
Answer. I have worked at it for twenty-two years.

Question. Have you ever taken and executed contracts for stone cutting; and if so, what ?

Answer. I have been a contractor for six years. Have executed contracts at Syracuse, New York, in Baltimore, &c.

Question. Have you ever executed Corinthian caps, and do you know the value and cost of such work?

Answer. I have had the supervision of such work, and know the value.

Question. Have you, at the request of this committee, measured and computed the marble named in the invoice here exhibited to you, at Hastings, New York?

Answer. I have.

Question. Have you examined the floor plans of the Charleston custom-bouse here exhibited to you?

Auswer. I have.

Question. How many columns will be required for the Charleston custom-house?

Answer. Fifty-two, as shown by the plan.

Question. Who accompanied you at the quarry and exhibited and pointed out to you the marble for the Charleston custom-house?

Answer. Mr. C. P. Dixon, of the firms of Larned & Co. and Beals. & Dixon; also, the foreman of Larned & Co., Mr. Webber. They opened the sheds in which the marble was stored for its inspection.

Question. How many blocks are named in the invoice, and in what state did you find them?

Answer. Thirty-one; of which fourteen are in a state of preparation and unfinished. They are all parts of the capitals of the columns of the exterior of the building, varying from an eighth part to the half part of a capital, and when put together and clamped, in not less than three nor more than five pieces, will form a cap; the whole thirty-one pieces being equal to eight caps and a fourth of a cap.

Question. What will those caps cost by the invoice in their present condition?

Answer. Five thousand two hundred and nineteen dollars fiftynine cents each, on the average, by the footing of the invoice.

Question. How much of that is for stock, and how much for labor and profit?

Answer. The stock in each cap is 1131, cubic feet, averaging $9 82 per cubic foot, amounting to $1, 112 87, and the labor, profit, &c., to $4,096 72, making the cost of each cap, in their present condition, as per the invoice, as before stated, $5,219 59.

Question. What is a fair market price for the stock in each of those caps, delivered in Charleston ?

Answer. Two dollars per foot.

Question. Do you know what is paid per foot for such stock, taken from that neighborbood, and delivered in New York ?

Answer. About $1 25 per foot.
Question. What would the stock in one of the caps be worth at $2

per foot ?

Answer. $226 66.

Question. What is the labor, at fair prices and fair number of days' work, worth in each cap ?

Answer. Two hundred and thirty-three days in one of the entire caps would be a liberal allowance, which, at government prices for labor, including tools, superintendence, profit, &c., as per the invoice, would be $679 34, that is allowing for work, &c., at $2 914.

Question. What would be the cost of one of the caps at that rate? Answer. $906 ; delivered in Charleston, say $1,000.

Question. At the rate the government has paid for these caps, as per invoice, how much more will it cost to finish them on the aver.

age?

Answer. $566 33. When finished they will cost the government $5,785 93.

Question. What is a fair market price for those caps delivered in Charleston ?

Answer. I think $1,000 is a fair price. I would be willing to do them at that price.

Question. What will be the price the government will have to pay for the fifty-two exterior caps for the Charleston custom-house, provided those already delivered and to be furnished for it cost as much as those paid for in this invoice?

Answer. Four are corner caps, which cost about a quarter less. Allowing for those, the cost of caps would, at such prices, be $295, 081 92.

Question. How much would they cost at a fair market price, delivered in Charleston ?

Answer. $51,000.

Question. Did you take an inventory of the other stock, cut and rough, at Hastings, intended for the Charleston custom-house, and if so, what was its character ?

Answer. Mr. Oertley, the government computer, and Mr. Cluskey, were with me. We took an inventory of all other rough and cut stone intended for the Charleston custom-house, and not in the invoice, all of which was pointed out to us by Mr. Dixon's foreman, in his presence ;

the contents of which we have, since our return, computed, and the character of which is as follows, so far as it is possisible to determine it from the indefinite wording of the contract. Part of architrave, stock and workmanship, 165 feet 7 inches, lineal, at $15 16 per foot..

$2,510 24 Carving done in part, 51 feet 5 inches, lineal, at $1 per foot ....

51 41 Medillion course, stock and workmanship, 70 feet 2 inches, lineal, at $19 84

1,392 10 Crown moulding course of cornice, stock and workmanship, 6 feet 8 inches, lineal, at $35 28.

235 20 Labor in roughing out 26 blocks for cap pieces

603 72 Labor on one cap piece, one-fourth finished

96 75 Labor on two cap pieces, three-fourths finished

580 50

$3,046 00

Rough stock in the foregoing 29 parts of caps, 472 la cu

bic feet, at $6 45..... Rough stock in thirteen blocks in sheds and yard, 575

cubic feet, at $4..

2,300 00

10,815 92

The valuation of the above for the stock and workmanship in the twenty-nine parts of caps, is based upon the prices charged for stock and work in the invoice, and for the part of architrave, medallion, and crown moulding course of cornice upon the contract with Larned & Co., and not upon the real or market value.

Question. Would the real or market value be greater or less than the prices you have used ?

Answer. It would be less.

Question. Was there any marble about the premises you did not inventory or compute?

Answer. There was a good deal that was unfit for the Charleston custom-house or any place else, refuse marble, “culls,” pieces off corners, &c. We inventoried and computed all you could find, or that was pointed out.

Question. How much do caps of that size, in one or two pieces, cost, when cut from Italian marble ?

Answer. About $100 more for stock.

Question. Is it a good plan to build caps out of more than two pieces ?

Answer. No, sir; they are not so solid. Two pieces is the least they ought to be in.

JULY 3, 1862. Committee met. Present: Sargent, Chamberlain, and Wall. Mr. OERTLEY recalled :

Question. Have you been to Hastings and New York at request of the committee to examine and compute the marble named in the invoice now exhibited to you?

Answer. I have.
Question. Who accompanied you at the quarry at Hastings ?

Answer. Mr. Cluskey, Mr. Hamilton, the contractor, Mr. C. P. Dixon, and his foreman, Mr. Weber.

Question. How many blocks are named in the invoice, and in what state did you find them?

Answer. There were thirty-one pieces. Seventeen were finished and fourteen not quite finished.

Question. How many capitals will those pieces make when finished ? Answer. They will make eight and one-quarter full capitals. Question. Is it usual to have capitals in so many pieces ?

Answer. It is unusual to cut them in more than two, or at most in three pieces.

Question. Is it bad work to cut them in more than two or three pieces ?

Answer. It is; because the fewer pieces the better.

Question. What do those caps cost each, on the average, by the prices in the invoice, when finished ?

Answer. In the neighborhood of six thousand dollars.

Question. What would be a fair market price for good caps of the same size and style ?

Answer. From a thousand to twelve hundred dollars.

Question. Did you take an inventory of the other stock, cut and rough, at Hastings for the Charleston custom-house; and if so, what is its character ?

Answer. I did ; and now submit it to the committee. Part of the architrave, stock and workmanship, 165 feet 7 inches, lineal, at $15 16 per foot...

$2,510 24 Carving done in part, 51 feet 5 inches, lineal, at $1 per foot 51 41 Medallion course, stock and worknanship, 70 feet 2 inches, lineal, at $19 84 per foot ..

1,392 10 Crown moulding course of cornice, stock and workmanship, 6 feet 8 inches, lineal, at $35 28 per foot..

235 20 Labor in roughing out 26 blocks for cap pieces..

603 72 Labor on one cap piece, one-fourth finished....

96 75 Labor on two cap pieces, three-fourths finished.

580 50 Rough stock in the foregoing twenty-nine, parts of caps, 4721 cubic feet, at $6 45 per foot.

3,046 00 Rough stock in 13 blocks in sheds and yard, 575 cubic feet, at $4 per foot....

2,300 00

Total :

10,815 92

Question. How did you arrive at the valuations named in this inventory?

Answer. For the twenty-nine parts of caps I used the prices of the invoice. For the entablature courses I used the prices of the contract, as near as I could understand it. It was a very singular contract.

Question. In what respect was the contract singular ?

Answer. It sets no price for rough stock nor for carving, which is left for day's work. It states definitely the price for ashlar, pilasters, and columns. All else is left undetermined.

Question. Is not $10,815 92 a very large price for the articles named in your inventory? In other words, is it not very far above a fair market price for such articles ?

Answer. It is a very high price.

Question. What would be a fair market value for the articles named in the inventory?

Answer. I think $6,000 would be a liberal price.

Question. Was there any marble about the premises you did not inventory or compute?

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