Imatges de pÓgina
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3 inches in width, up to 8 feet, per superficial foot additional, fifty cents, (50 cents.)

Rough stock, not exceeding 30 cubic feet, including freight and delivery, per cubic foot, forty-four cents, (44 cents;) from 30 to 70 cubic feet, including freight and delivery, three-quarters (*) of a cent additional per cubic foot; exceeding 70 cubic feet, including freight and delivery, three-quarters (*) of a cent additional per cubic foot.

The stones of greater width than three times their thickness, including freight and delivery, an additional price of twenty-five (25) per cent. for each additional 3 inches in width.

The work on the above will be measured and paid for by the superficial foot. For each superficial foot of fine-hammered granite work seen, equal to No. 1 hammering on their sample, eighty cents, (80 cents ;) for each superficial foot of hammered granite work seen, equal to No. 2 hammering on their sample, sixty cents, (60 cents ;) for each superficial foot of hammered granite work seen, equal to No. 3 hammering on their sample, forty-eight cents, (48 cents ;) for each superficial foot of hammered granite work seen, equal to No. 4 hammering on their sample, thirty-seven cents, (37 cents.)

For all beds, builds, ends, backs, &c., hammered full to the square, as ordered, per superficial foot, eighteen cents, (18 cents.)

For channels and rebates, not exceeding 4 by 2 inches, per lineal foot, sixty cents, (60 cents.)

For moulding of one curve, one hundred (100) per cent. additional upon the cost of plain work per superficial foot.

For mouldings of two curves, two hundred per cent. additional upon the cost of plain work per superficial foot.

For each arris on same, per lineal foot, twenty cents.

For hammering bevelled work, forty per cent. additional to plain work, but to apply only to the part cut off from the square work, and which is in no case to be measured in the plain work.

For hammering circular work seventy per cent. additional to plain work.

For balustrade, including base, &c., and also including cost of stock, freight, and workmanship, per lineal foot, thirty-seven dollars and fifty cents, ($37 50.)

It is further agreed and understood that the granite to be used shall be the Dix Island granite, of the best quality, and that the different styles of cutting shall be in strict conformity with the samples left at the Treasury Department by the said parties of the second part, and shall be executed to the satisfaction of the superintendent.

It is also agreed and understood by the parties hereto, that the said parties of the second part shall deliver the said material, thereby con: tracted for, at the site of the said extension, and at such points as the said superintendent may designate, and at their own cost, risk, and expense.

And the said party of the first part, Secretary of the Treasury as aforesaid, doth promise, covenant, and agree well and truly to pay or cause to be paid unto the said parties of the second part, their heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, from time to time as the material is delivered, (wrought, fitted, and finished as aforesaid,) ninety per cent. of the value thereof, said amount to be ascertained and duly certified to the department by the said superintendent, it being agreed and understood by and between the parties hereto that the remaining ten per cent. of the value of said material shall be retained until the final and entire delivery thereof, and its approval and acceptance as aforesaid by the said superintendent.

And it is further agreed by and between the parties to these presents, that if, from any cause whatsoever, the said parties of the second part should fail to deliver the granite, wrought, fitted, and finished as aforesaid, with the required promptness, in the opinion of the said superintendent, to insure its completion by the time specified above, it shall become the duty of the superintendent, and he shall be, and is hereby, authorized and empowered, after eight days' due notice thereof in writing, left at the shop, office, or usual place of abode of the said parties of the second part, or with their agent, without effect, to purchase and procure the necessary materials, and have the necessary work performed to supply any deficiency caused by the delinquency of the said parties of the second part; and the actual cost thereof, together with fifteen per cent. thereon, shall be deducted from any moneys due or owing to the said parties of the second part, on account of this contract; and if there is not that amount due them thereon, their bondsmen are to be held liable for any deficiency, to be recovered of them by suit in the name of the United States.

It is also covenanted and agreed by and between the parties to this contract, that the said parties of the second part shall execute, with two or more sufficient sureties, a bond to the United States in the sum of fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) conditioned for the faithful performance of this contract and the agreements and covenants herein made by the said parties of the second part.

Is is also agreed, covenanted, and understood by and between the parties hereto, that no member of Congress, or other person whose name is not at this time disclosed, shall be admitted to any interest in this contract.

It is further covenanted and agreed by the parties hereto, that this contract shall not be assigned except by consent of the Secretary of the Treasury; and that any assigạment thereof, except as aforesaid, will be a forfeiture of the same, and shall subject the said parties of the second part and their bondsmen to such damages, to be recovered of them by suit in the name of the United States, as shall have been suffered by the said party of the first part.

It is also covenanted and agreed by and between the parties hereto. that in case any additions, omissions, or alterations are determined upon, the same shall be specifically noted hereon, and the amount to be paid or deducted therefor agreed upon and stated.

It is also agreed and understood by and between the parties hereto. that the said parties of the second part are to furnish the material for the outside of the remainder of the Treasury building at the prices heretofore named for similar work when Congress may have made the necessary appropriations therefor: Provided, That at that time it is deemed for the interest of the United States to employ them. In witness whereof the said James Guthrie, Secretary of the Treas

ury, as aforesaid, for and in behalf of the United States, hath

hereunto subscribed his name and caused the seal of the (L. s.] Treasury Department to be hereunto affixed, and the said

Horace Beal and Courtland P. Dixon have also hereunto sub-
scribed their names and affixed their seals this tenth day of
October, A. D. 1855.

JAMES GUTHRIE.
HORACE BEAL. [L. s.]
C. P. DIXON.

[L. S.] In presence of

A. H. BOWMAN,

Engineer in charge of Treasury Department.
R. C. MORGAN.

EXECUTIVE DOCUMENT NO. 41, SECOND SESSION THIRTY-FIFTH CONGRESS.

REFERRED TO IN MR. CLARK'S TESTIMONY.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, February 26, 1859. Sir: In reply to Senate resolution, passed February 18, 1859, directing you to "inform the Senate the amount already paid for granite for the construction of the south wing of the Treasury Department, together with an estimate of the amount that will be necessary to complete the said wing of the Treasury Building," I have the honor to report:

That the total amount paid for granite for the superstructure of the south wing of the Treasury extension, up to this date, is four hundred and forty-nine thousand seven hundred and fourteen dollars, ($449, 714.)

The estimated amount for granite required to complete the south wing, is thirty-nine thousand eight hundred and sixty-four dollars, ($39, 864.)

The details of some portion of the work are not yet definitely determined, and when decided may alter the aggregate of this estimate for completion.

In compliance with your instructions to report in detail upon the causes why the total amount paid so far exceeds the estimated amount placed against the names of the successful bidders in the printed report, transmitted to the Senate, as a reply to the resolution of December 29, 1858, upon the same subject, I have the honor to submit tbe following detailed reports, showing the causes of, and reasons for, this excess.

But before enumerating these details it is proper for me to say that the printed report alluded to was prepared under the direction of your predecessor, in answer to a call of the House of Representatives for information of the facts and reasons why the contract was awarded to Beals & Dixon, and for all the papers connected therewith, and showing the amount of each bid for the work, &c., &c. The point involved in the inquiry was the simple one of comparative amounts of bids, and was totally irrespective of ultimate cost. The information furnished in reply was solely for the purpose of elucidating that point. Assumed quantities were therefore and necessarily) used, as well as assumed styles of finish, on which to compute an aggregate from the detail of each bid. The same assumed quantities were used in com. puting all the bids; and thus that answer to the inquiry of the House of Representatives covered the point of its inquiry.

In drafting the letter to accompany that report for the Secretary to sign, the clerk then in my office, who was not familiar with its details, erroneously called the sums in the tabular bids “the gross amount for all the granite required in the superstructure." This error escaped the notice of both the late Secretary and myself at the time the documents were transmitted. It was not the gross amount. nor even intended as an approximate estimate to it. The reasons why actual quantities were not used are that they were then unknown, and it was impossible to accurately ascertain them from any data then in the department's possession. This was three years ago, and actual quantities and styles are not even now determined upon for every portion of the work. All the drawings the department then had for its guidance were contained upon two sheets, prepared by the present architect of the Capitol extension, and approved by Congress, being a general plan of the entrance story and three front elevations, totally devoid of details, with but few measurements, and the different elevations disagreeing with each other. And when it is known that competent draughtsmen have been steadily employed since that period, under the architect of the Treasury Department, in preparing and elaborating details and measurements, and that the whole is not yet completed, it will be manifest that the meagre and chaotic datum then before the department placed it wholly out of its power to make an accurate estimate of details.

Assumed quan tities were therefore necessarily used, pro forma, to ascertain the relative (not the absolute) amounts of bids and their comparative cheapness. The bid and contract determined prices only; quantities and style are not determined by either the bids or the contract-only the rates at which quantities and styles should be paid for.

The attention of Congress was called (Secretary's Report on the Finances, 1855–’56, p. 570) to the meagreness of detail the department had for its guidance, and Congress notified that the department was using its discretion in deviating from the original papers, and asked to designate how far the superintendent could deviate from the drawings to harmonize their various details. The silence of Congrese on the subject was construed into an approval of the department's exercise of its discretion, and the work has been so conducted.

The printed report above alluded to was transmitted in reply to Senate resolution of December 29, 1858, because its details covered all the points involved in that resolution, and its transmission would avoid the delay consequent in making manuscript copies of the roluminous documents. The delay of the sixteen days in answering your present inquiry has been unavoidable ; my assistant, with three experts, has been constantly and laboriously employed, day and night, in comparing and computing the annexed details.

The correctness of the method of computing by assumed quantities and styles to determine the relative amount of bids, and for the purpose covered in the original resolution from the House of Representatives, is established by these details now finished, which prove that in computing all the bids by actual quantities and styles, as paid for, the bid of Beals & Dixon is still the lowest.

The following details are now respectfully submitted in compliance with your instructions. The total amount paid for granite and other stone for south wing of

Treasury extension, say, for cellar, area walls, piers, &c., purchased

in open market, and not included in schedule and synopsis of 1855— To Beals & Dixon

$9,062 68 D. 0. Neil..

12,628 22 Sumwalt & Green..

3,867 22 W. McCloy

373 38

25,871 50

$449,714 00

The total amount paid for granite on the superstructure

of the south wing, under the contract of Beals &

Dixon, is ......
The estimated amount of granite required to complete

the south wing under Beals & Dixon's contract, (which
may be varied by changing the plan on which the

estimate is made,) less 10 per cent. retained ..... Amount which will be due Beals & Dixon on the com

pletion of their contract, and now retained for its faithful performance.

35,878 00

53,954 00

Total amount of Beals & Dixon's contract for south wing. 539,546 00 Amount appearing on the canvass of bids for granite for

south wing against the names of Beals and Dixon in the printed report transmitted to the Senate .. 243,556 00

Excess over printed report....

295, 990 00

The excess is accounted for in gross as follows :
Amount from increase of quantities ...... $93,962 00
Amount from change of plan and style of
work ....

202.028 00

$295, 990 00

In detail, this excess is accounted for in the following table :

H. Rep. Com. 137--8

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