Imatges de pÓgina
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Armament.

[blocks in formation]

56

387

422

16, 537, 454 68

RECAPITULATION.

Garrisons.

Classes.

Howitzers &

mortars.

Guns.

First class.
Second class
Third class
Fourth class

2, 610 20, 570

666 6, 841 635

6, 071

2,947
1,098
1,033

227
104

Grand total.

3, 911

33, 482

5,078

REMARKS.

The First Class, to be first constructed, comprising such as are most necessary for the protection of great cities, naval establishments, roads of rendez-
vous, and positions which an enemy might occupy for the war, to the great injury of the country.

The SECOND CLASS, to be next constructed, comprising such as cover important harbors, roadsteads, and naval stations not in the first class, and complete,
or nearly so, the defences of the places found in that class.

The THIRD CLASS, to be last constructed, comprising the defences necessary to the security of the smaller cities and towns, less useful and important
harbors, sounds, and inlets, and the remaining intersections of the interior parallel water communications.

The FOURTH CLASS comprises conditional works, the necessity for which will depend on the creation of artificial harbors, canals, great naval depots, &c.

N. B -In forming these classes, reference has been made also to the existing state of defence. In the first and second the defences stand in the order of respective importance; in the third and fourth, in geographical order.

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TABLE B,

Containing a list of the existing works on the seaboard which it is advisable

to preserve and retain as accessories to the proposed system of defence

DESIGNATION OF WORKS.

Fort at Wiscasset
Fort Preble, Portland harbor..
Fort Scammel, Portland harbor..
Fort McCleary, Portsmouth harborf.
Fort on Gloucestert.
Fort Independence, Boston harbor.
Fort Warren and dependencies, Boston harbor.
Fort at New Bedford I.
Fort Wolcott, Narraganset roads.
Fort Green, Narraganset roads.
Fort at Sag Harborf.
Fort Hale, New Haven harbor.
Fort Columbus, Governor's island, New York harbor..
Castle Williams, Governor's island, New York harbor.
South Battery, Governor's island, New York harbor...
Fort Wood, Bedloe's island, New York harbor.
Fort Gibson, Ellis's island, New York harbor..
Fort Gansevoort, City of New York...
Battery, Hubert island, City of New York..
Fort Lafayette, narrows of New York harbor.
Fort Mifflin, Delaware river...
Fort McHenry, Baltimore harbor.
Fort Madison, Annapolis harbort.
Fort Severn, Annapolis harbor I.
Fort Washington, Potomac river.
Fort Norfolk, Hampton roads.
Fort Neilson, Hampton roads..
Fort Moultrie, Charleston harbori.
Castle Pinckney, Charleston harbor
Fort Jackson, Savannah river.
Fort St. Philip, Mississippi riverf.

Maine.
. Maine.
Maine.
New Hampshire.
.Massachusetts.
.Massachusetts.
. Massachusetts.

Massachusetts.
Rhode Island.
..Rhode Island.
. New York.
.Connecticut.
New York.
New York.
New York.
New York.
.New York,
New York,
New York.
New York.
Pennsylvania.
Maryland.
.Maryland.
Maryland.
.Maryland.
Virginia.

Virginia
South Carolina.
.South Carolina.
Georgia.
..Louisiana.

REMARKS.

Some of these will be modified by the new system, and some, on further examination, may have to give place to new works ; these last are marked thus

It is probable that several works, deserving a place in this list, have been omitted. All existing works on the coast, without exception, should be maintained until the new system is applied to the ground they occupy, or to the neighboring coast.

TABLE C, Exhibiting the cost of certain projected fortifications for the sea-coast defence, the forces necessary to protect them, with the existing

3, 260

425
3, 700

250

180
4, 800
5,365

6, 740 6,575 6,300 6, 750 6, 820 5, 200 4,635 43, 020

$2,500,000 2,500,000 2,500,000 2,500,000 2,500,000 2,500,000 4,250,000 19, 250,000

$39,000

63, 750
105,000
37,500
27,000
120,000

54,750
447, 600

$750,000

750,000
750,000
750,000

750,000
1,000,000
1,250,000
6,000,010

$789,000
813, 750
855, 000
787,500

777,000
1,120,000
1,304, 750
6,447,000

26,980

works, the forces necessary for perfect security, with the aid of the proposed defences, and the expense of the troops in both cases.

Comparison of the force necessary to defend them without, and

with, the projected works.

Expense of the troops kept under pay

with the proposed works.

Number of troops Number of troops required with the pro-
necessary with the

jected works.
existing works.

Places.

Aggregate cost of the proposed works.

Expense of the troops kept under

pay with the existing works. *

Under pay.

Within
call.

Expense of the regulars

for six months, at $150 per man.

Expense of the militia

for six months, at $250 per man.

Expense of regulars and

militia.

Under
pay.

Within
call.

Regulars. Militia.

Total.

Militia.

Boston...
Narraganset roads
New York
Philadelphia
Baltiniore.............
Norfolk ..............
New Orleans.

$1,279,429 51

1,817,578 26 5, 201, 834 27

817,025 45

917,542 58
2, 164, 147 59
1,566,515 42
13, 764,073 08

10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
17,000
77,000

10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
3,000

260
425
700
250
180
800
365

3,000
3,000
3,000
3,000
3,000
4,000
5,000

Total.

63,000

2,980

24,000

Number of troops necessary with the existing works
Number of troops required with the projected works, under pay and within call

140,000
70,000

Expense of defending the above-mentioned points during a campaign of six months with the existing works.
Expense of defending the above-mentioned points during a campaign of six months with the projected works.

$ 19, 250,000

6,447, 000
12, 803,000

Difference.....

N. B.-In one campaign of six months the difference of expense between the two systems will amount to within $961,073 08 of the whole cost of the projected works. The expense
of the troops, above stated, results from a calculation which gives for the cost of a regular soldier $300 per annum, and for the cost of A militia soldier $500 per annum, the expense of
officers being in both cases included. No estimate can be made of the enormous contingent expenses in assembling, organizing, and providing militia forces, of hospitals, Waste of
property, loss of time, &c. This estimate is undoubtedly below the truth. The forces under pay necessary for defence, with the proposed works, consist of peace garrisons, increased hy
a portion of militia, the residue of militia under pay being stationed upon the lines of approach of an enemy.

* Supposing all militia serving six months and costing on an average $250 per man.

TABLE D,

Exhibiting the amount of militia force which may be concentrated at Boston, Newport, New York, Philadelphia, Norfolk, Baltimore,

Charleston, Savannah, and New Orleans, successively, from the 1st to the 11th day; each day's march being computed at fifteen miles ; founded on the census of 1810.

Days.

Boston.

Newport, R. I

New York.

Philadelphia

Norfolk, Va. Baltimore, Md. Charleston, S. C. Savannah, Ga

New Orleans. No. 3.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7
8
9
10..

3, 438
19, 028
26, 260
36, 631
44, 259
51, 661
70, 575
83, 502
95, 432
104, 439
120, 064

1, 357 1, 854 10, 199 13, 715 25, 555 33, 707 51, 113 54, 201 68, 687 84, 704 100, 634

10, 467 16, 646 27,926 38, 109 42, 155 56, 036 70, 871 93, 230 104, 686 115, 575 135, 712

13, 900 17, 564 25, 322 49, 358 58, 134 83, 991 104, 787 120, 887 131, 936 152, 766 153, 891

1, 930 2,790 4, 052 6, 793 10, 478 13, 073 18, 318 20, 925 29, 074 32, 835 40, 669

3, 879 10, 310 13, 523 21, 474 25, 724 40, 039 51, 080 62, 035 62, 035 68, 735 80, 292

2,060 5, 265 7, 461 11, 497 14, 187 17, 300 18, 480 22, 285 29, 807 33, 024 43, 972

1, 128 3, 736 4, 759 5, 313 7,850 15, 291 17,808 18, 821 27,542 31,087 41, 671

1, 437 3, 483 3, 757 5, 040 5, 654 5, 872 6, 283 7,648 8, 991 9, 475 10, 620

11.

[Ho. REPs., Ex. Doc. No. 243, 24TH CONGRESS, 1st sysSION ]

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES TO THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES, ACCOMPANIED WITH REPORTS FROM TAE SECRET' RIES OF WAR AND NAVY, RELATIVE TO THE MILITARY AND NAVAL DE FENCES OF THE COUNTRY.

To the Senate:

I transmit herewith reports from the Secretaries of the War and Navy Departments, to whom were referred the resolutions adopted by the Senate on the 18th of February last, requesting information of the probable amount of appropriations that would be necessary to place the land and naval defences of the country upon a proper footing of strength and respectability.

In respect to that branch of the subject which falls more particularly under the notice of the Secretary of War, and in the consid ation of which he has arrived at conclusions different from those contained in the report from the Engineer bureau, I think it proper to add my concurrence in the views expressed by the Secretary

ANDREW JACKSON. WASHINGTON, April 8, 1836.

DEPARTMENT OF WAR, April 7, 1836. Sir: In conformity with your instructions, I have the honor to transmit reports from the engineer and ordnance departments, furnishing so much of the information required by the resolution of the Senate of February 18, 1836, as relates to the fortifications of the country, and to a supply of the munitions of war. The former branch of this subject has required laborious investigations on the part of the officers charged with this duty, and their report has therefore been longer delayed than, under other circumstances, would have been proper; but the whole matter was too important to have the interests involved in it sacrificed to undue precipitancy.

The engineer report was received at the department on Friday last, and I have embraced such portions of the intervening time as other official calls and a slight indisposition would allow me to devote to its examination. I did not consider that any suggestions I could make would justify a further delay at this advanced stage of the session, while at the same time, I am aware that this letter will need all the allowance which these circumstances can claim for it.

It is obvious that, in the consideration of any general and permanent system of national defence, comprehensive views are not only necessary, but professional experience and a knowledge of practical details; such information, in fact, as must be obtained by long and careful attention to the various subjects which form the elements of this inquiry. Although, therefore, I do not concur in all the suggestions contained in these reports, and more particularly in those which relate to the nature and extent of some of our preparations, still I have thought it proper to lay them before you, rather than to substitute any peculiar views of my own for them. Both furnish facts highly interesting to the community, and if they anticipate dangers which it may be thought are not likely to happen, and suggest preparations which future exigencies will not probably require, they are still valuable documents, presenting the necessary materials for the action of the legislature. The report from the engineer department, in particular

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