Imatges de pÓgina
PDF
EPUB

« This production is at once distinguishable for poetry and pathos: it should, we think, be printed with the correspondence of Theodosius and Constantia, as published by Dr. Langhorne, in the same manner as Pope's Epistle from Eloisa is prefixed to the Letters of Abelard." Poet. Reg.

6. TRIP TO HOLLAND: containing Sketches of Characters; with Cursory Observations on the Manners and Customs of the Dutch, 2 vols. 12mo. New Edition, 5s. sewed.

This work is in the manner of the Sentimental Journey through France ; and the Reviewers conclude their account of it with observing.-." It is a performance which, in our opinion, STERNE himself would not have been ashamed to own.”

7. WOMAN'S WILL: a Comedy in Five Acts, in New British Theatre, No. 13, price 2s. 6d.

Ardeat ipsa licet tormentis gaudet amantis. Juv, Sat. Found by competent judges unfit for the London boards. “A Comedy with the vis comica in it! without any pantomime, bo-peep scenes-away, away! it will not do." But still some theatric director may get over these grand objections to the piece, and, grateful for the publie favour, add it to the rationalities of his stage.

**. In the present production, the wretched and hackneyed witticism touching the Bond-street Lounger will not be found: nor any teniporary allusion whatever,-allusions, which, to borrow the language of Fielding, have rendere l modern comedy' as dull as a drawing-room.The pleasantry here exhibited is such as would have been pleasantry a century or two ago, and which will be the same a century or two hence. It is general and not particular. The latter, indeed, can only be described as satire, and belongs in no sorl to the queen of smiles. To « elevate and surprise” she should utterly disclaim. Murderers, or supposed murderers, with wonderful disclosures at the end of the piece, are foreign to her scene. Such kind of performance may be called comedy upon stilts, or rather comedy run mud. At the same time it must be admitted that a production so conceived inay be deserving of praise. It is, however, a praise that belongs to the novel, and has nothing to do in the present case. There are also compositions on the stage with the name of comedies, but which in fact are satires. These too have certainly merit: yet, it is still insisted, that such merit is not of the kind to which it pretends. But whoever is desirous of knowing what comedy really ís, must have recourse to Moliere. It is a species of drama in which humor is all in all : plot or story is absolutely as nothing. Who, for instance, has less of perplexity in his plays; less of intrigo, as Mr. Bayes has ludicrously termed'it, than the Frenchman in question? Fable, it is true, is highly essential to tragedy; and even a compler fable. In comedy, on the contrary, so much of story alone is requisite as may serve to draw out character,-business is actually a fault. “ Yet this is the taste of our comedy. Our writers are all for plot and intrigue; and never appear so well satisfied with themselves as when, to speak in their own phrase, they contrive to have a great deal of business on their hands. Indeed they have reason; for it hides their inability to colour manners, which is the proper, but much harder, province of true comedy." HURD on the Provinces of the Druma.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

CORRECTIONS.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

VOL. 1. Page. Line.

39. 7. dele “ But” and line 8. read “ But what " 41. 15. read “ general charge

38. for “ said " read “urged” 46. 18. dele (i, e.) 52. 16. for “master” read “ marten" 58. 5. from bottom, read" but as 113. 15. read “as night” 116. 9. place à comma at“ late” and line 12. dele (?) 142. ult. for "silly" read “sily 210 4. read “ while it is." 212. 4. add STEEV. 223. 11. from bottom, for “word” read “ mark ” 228. 9. from bottom, read "Duke" 229. 7. dele " and " and line 21. read “ Duke" 244.

9. from bottom, dele the comma at“ear" and place it at“ generally's 249. put a semicolon at“ wrake” $38. after “ pale or black” add " (the first as spoken of the counte

nance, the latter of the dress") 340. for “ signs imperfect," read " imperfect signs 366. bottom, read, who had he himself eternity, and could put breath

into his work, would beguile Nature of her custoin, so perfect. ly he is her ape.”

VOL. 11. Page. Line.

20. 7. for “ thorn out of” read “ romaunt of" 3S. 4. from bottom, read “ entraints” 54. 8. read " is " 63. after the second note of Johnson insert the following by

Steevens“We might as plausiblyread greaves a kind of boots. The metamorphosis of the leathern covers of books into boots, seems to be more apposite than the conversion of them

into instruments of war.” 117. 5. from bottom, for “moralists” read “moralities” 121. 5. for “rock and rocket," read “roch and rochęt” 144. 8. froin bottom, put a full stop at " engagements" 169. 12. from bottom, read “ propose” 248. 5. from bottom, for many” read"

some few" 265. 2. read “found united," &e.

The Editor's notes are distinguished by the letter B. except at the follow ing pages, where it has been omitted in the hurry of the press.

VOL. I. Page 39-49—73-101-106-111-112—115—207—304-333349.

VOL. II. Page 31–44–64–85—178—205--223,

« AnteriorContinua »