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and three agents provided to protect the interest of the United States, at $1,500 a year for each, a sum at that day worth more than four times what it is now in California.

Then followed the acts in 1806, 1807, 1811, 1813, 1814, 1815, 1816, 1818, 1919, down to the act of 3d March, 1819, conferring power on the registers and receivers, as commissioners, for the adjudication of claims for the country now falling, in part, within the limits of the present State of Louisiana, and part within the present limits of the States of Mississippi and Alabama, giving them authority to appoint clerks, or translators, at $1,500 per annum, and a like sum to each of the commissioners for their services in relation to such claims.

We also find that in the intermediate years, and in some instances in the years already mentioned, Congress passed laws for the adjudication of claims, stipulating compensation in the Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan Territories; and returning to Louisiana, which opened a wider sphere of governmental action, have continued their legislation through successive years down to the last session of Congress.

In like manner when we acquired the Floridas by the treaty of cession in 1919, Congress also created a Board of Commissioners for the selilement of foreign titles; and on the 26th May, 1824, passed a law referring to the courts, with appeal to the Supreme Court of the United States, claims within what was known, under the Spanish régime, as Upper Louisiana, embracing the present States of Missouri and Arkansas. This law makes provision in the way of compensation to district attorneys, United States marshals, and judges.

Then, also, Čongress, by a law passed the 230 May, 1928, conferred jurisdiction on the superior court of Florida, for the adjudication of claims arising from foreign titles, with a right of appeal to the Supreme Court. The 10th section of the act made it “lawful for the President of the United States to appoint a law agent, whose special duty it shall be to superintend the interests of the United States in the premises, to continue him in place as long as the public interest requires his continuance; and to allow such pay to the agent as the President may think reasonable." And the 11th section of the same act declared it " lawful for the President to employ assistant counsel, if, in his opinion, the public interest shall require the same; and to allow to such counsel, and the district attorney, such compensation as he may think reasonable.” Such assistant counsel, we understand, was employed, and the record of the proper department will no doubt show that liberal compensation was awarded.

Then, again, on 17th June, 1844, Congress passed an act extending the provisions of the act of Congress approved 26th May, 1824, to Lou siuna, Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama, conferring jurisdiction on the courts for the examination of foreign titles, and carrying with it all the emolument provisions necessary to the object, and opening an immense field of litigation, by which claims, after ihe lapse of more than half a century, were brought before the highest court in the Union for final settlement.

In the mean time look at the enormous expenses the United States necessarily incurred in creating the numerous commissions all over the country, where the foreign titles and ancient settlements existed, when

the new order of government supplanted its predecessors; in organizing federal courts, and in managing and defending the interests of the United States. Then consider the vexatious and harassing effects upon citizens and the States, and the officers of the general government, which ensued in settling titles in the above-named Territories.

The system adopted by this government for the settlement of claims in California, looks to a speedy and final settlement; and if Congress will give the means and the timely aid asked for, the whole business will soon be at an end, the record closed, and Congress released from further importunities.

Your committee have given the whole subject a careful investigation, as it was the wish of the Secretary of the Interior that the commission should be continued, as will appear from the annexed extract from his annual report for 1854:

" It will be necessary again to extend the time for the completion of the work of the commission to ascertain and settle the private land claims in California. It expires on the 4th of March next; and if the time is extended, it is desirable it should be done sufficiently early in the session to enable the department to advise the commissioners to continue their labors. Notwithstanding the indefatigable exertions of the commissioners, their labors cannot, with a due regard to the public interests, be closed within the time allotted."

For the above considerations, your committee respectfully recommend the passage of the bill upon which this report is predicated.

and three agents provided to protect the interest of the United Stat at $1,500 a year for each, a sum at that day worth more than fi times what it is now in California.

Then followed the acts in 1806, 1807, 1811, 1813, 1814, 1815, 15 1818, 1819, down to the act of 3d March, 1819, conferring power on registers and receivers, as commissioners, for the adjudication of cla for the country now falling, in part, within the limits of the pres State of Louisiana, and part within the present limits of the States Mississippi and Alabama, giving them authority to appoint clerks, translators, at $1,500 per annum, and a like sum to each of the co missioners for their services in relation to such claims.

We also find that in the intermediate years, and in some instances the years already mentioned, Congress passed laws for the adjudicat: of claims, stipulating compensation in the Illinois, Indiana, and Mi igan Territories; and returning to Louisiana, which opened a wii' sphere of governmental action, have continued their legislation throu successive years down to the last session of Congress.

In like manner when we acquired the Floridas by the treaty of c sion in 1919, Congress also created a Board of Commissioners for 1 selilement of foreign titles; and on the 26th May, 1824, passed a li. referring to the courts, with appeal to the Supreme Court of the Unit States, claims within whai was known, under the Spanish régime, Upper Louisiana, embracing the present States of Missouri and A kansas. This law makes provision in the way of compensation district attorneys, United States marshals, and judges.

Then, also, Congress, by a law passed the 230 May, 1828, conferr jurisdiction on the superior court of Florida, for the adjudication claims arising from foreign titles, with a right of appeal to the Supre Court. The 10th section of the act made it “lawful for the President the Cnited States to appoint a law agent, whose special duty it sh be to superintend the interests of the United States in the premises, continue him in place as long as the public interest requires his cont uance; and to allow such pay to the agent as the President may thi reasonable.” And the 11th section of the same act declared it “ la ful for the President to employ assistant counsel, if, in his opinion, 1 public interest shall require the same; and to allow to such couns and the district attorney, such compensation as he may think reasoi ble.” Such assistant counsel, we understand, was employed, and t record of the proper department will no doubt show that liberal co: pensation was awarded.

Then, again, on 17th June, 1844, Congress passed an act extendi the provisions of the act of Congress approved 26th May, 1924, Lou siana, Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama, conferri jurisdiction on the courts for the examination of foreign titles, and ca rying with it all the emolument provisions necessary to the object, a! opening an immense field of litigation, by which claims, after the lap of more than half a century, were brought before the highest court the Union tur final settlement.

In the mean time look at the enormous expenses the United Stat necessarily incurred in creating the numerous commissions all over t country, where the foreign titles and ancient settlements existed, whe

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