Imatges de pÓgina
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Highlands, Lines written in the, after a Visit to 0,1

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Burns's Country, 246.
Homer, To, 119.
Hope, To, 5.
Human Seasons, The, 44.
Hunt, Leigh, To, 37.
Hunt, Mr. Leigh, left Prison, Written on the

Day that, 5.
Hunt's, Leigh, Poem, The Story of Rimini, On,

38.
Hymn to Apollo, 7.
HYPERION : A FRAGMENT, 198.
Hyperion : A Vision, 233.

Imitation of Spenser, 1.
In Answer to a Sonnet by J. H. Reynolds, 43.
Indolence, Ode on, 135.
Induction to a Poem, Specimen of an, 27.
ISABELLA, OR THE POT OF Basil, 110.
'I stood tip-toe upon a little hill,' 14.

am frighten'd with most hateful
thoughts !' 240.
‘O! were I one of the Olympian twelve,' 239
Ode : ‘Bards of Passion and of Mirth,' 125.
Ode on a Grecian Urn, 134.
Ode on Indolence, 135.
Ode on M

ncholy, 126.
Ode to a Nightingale, 144.
Ode to Apollo, 6.
Ode to Fanny, 137.
Ode to Maia, Fragment of an, 119.
Ode to Psyche, 142.
On a Picture of Leander, 38.
On Death, 1.
On Fame, 142.
On Fame, Another, 142.
On first looking into Chapman's Homer, 9.
On hearing the Bagpipe, and seeing The Stranger

played at Inverary, 246.
On leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, 9.
On Leigh Hunt's Poem The Story of Rimini, 38.
On Oxford, 252.
On receiving a Curious Shell and a Copy of

Verses, 4.
On seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, 39.
On seeing the Elgin Marbles, 36.
On sitting down to read King Lear once again,

40.
On the Grasshopper and Cricket, 35.
On the Sea, 37.
On Think not of it, sweet one, so,' 38.
On visiting the Tomb of Burns, 120.
OTHO THE GREAT, 158.

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a, 123,

LAMIA, 146.
Last Sonnet, The, 232.
Laurel Crown, To a Young Lady who sent me

a, 7.
Leander, On a Picture of, 38.
Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, On, 9.
Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, 40.
Lines to Fanny, 214.
Lines : ‘Unfelt, unseen, unheard,' 37.
Lines written in the Highlands, after a Visit to

Burns's Country, 246.
Little Extempore, A, 249.
Lock of Milton's Hair, On seeing a, 39.
Lovers, A Party of, 251.

Party of Lovers, A, 251.
Picture of Leander, On a, 38.
POEMS OF 1818-1819, THE, 110.
Prophecy, A: To George Keats in America,

249.
Psyche, Ode to, 142.

Reynolds, John Hamilton, Epistle to, 240.
Reynolds, John Hamilton, To, 44.
Robin Hood, 41.
Ronsard, Translation from a Sonnet of, 123.

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Maia, Fragment of an Ode to, 119.
Mathew, George Felton, Epistle to, 9.
Meg Merrilies, 243.
Melancholy, Ode on, 126.
Mermaid Tavern, Lines on the, 40.
Milton's Hair, On seeing a Lock of, 39.
Modern Love, 238.

Sea, On the, 37.
Sharing Eve's Apple, 248.
'Shed no tear! O shed no tear!' 141.
Sleep, To, 142.
Sleep and Poetry, 18.
Solitude, Sonnet to, 12.
Some Ladies, To, 3.
Song about Myself, A, 244.
Songs :

Daisy's Song, 233.
Faery Songs, 141.

Nightingale, Ode to a, 144.
Nile, To the, 41.

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Folly's Song, 240.
‘Hush, hush ! tread softly! hush, hush, my

dear,' 120.
'I had a dove, and the sweet dove died,' 125.
"The stranger lighted from his steed,' 240.
Written on a Blank Page in Beaumont and

Fletcher's Works, 42.
Sonnets :

Addressed to Benjamin Robert Haydon, 33.
• After dark vapours have oppress'd our

plains,' 36.
As from the darkening gloom a silver dove,'

12.
• Blue ! 't is the life of heaven, — the do-

main,' 43.
Dream after reading Dante's Episode of Paolo

and Francesca, A, 138.
* Happy is England ! I could be content,' 35.

How many bards gild the lapses of time,' 8.
Human Seasons, The, 44.
*If by dull rhymes our English must be

chain'd,' 144.
"Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and

there,' 8.
Last Sonnet, The, 232.
*Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve,' 13.
On a Picture of Leander, 38.
On Fame, 142.
On Fame, Another, 142.
On first looking into Chapman's Homer, 9.
On hearing the Bagpipe and seeing The

Stranger played at Inverary, 246.
On leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, 9.
On Leigh Hunt's Poem The Story of Rimini,

38.
On seeing the Elgin Marbles, 36.
On sitting down to read King Lear once

again, 40.
On the Grasshopper and Cricket, 35.
On the Sea, 37.
On visiting the Tomb of Burns, 120.
* The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone!'

214.
To a Cat, 252.
To a Friend who sent me some Roses, 13.
To Ailsa Rock, 121.
To a Lady seen for a Few Moments at Vaux-

hall, 123.
To a Young Lady who sent me a Laurel

Crown, 7.
To Byron, 2.
To Chatterton, 2.
To Fanny, 215.
To G. A. W., 34.
To George Keats, 251.
Το

‘Had I a man's fair form,' 26.
To Haydon, 36,

To Homer, 119.
To John Hamilton Reynolds, 44.
To Kosciusko, 34.
To Leigh Hunt, Esq., 37.
To my Brother George, 26.
To my Brothers, 33.
"To one who has been long in city pent,' 13.
To Sleep, 142.
To Solitude, 12.
To Spenser, 42.
To the Nile, 41.
Translation from a Sonnet of Ronsard, 123.
• When I have fears that I may cease to be,'

39.
"Why did I laugh to-night ? No voice will

tell,' 137.
Written in Answer to a Sonnet, 43.
Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, 35.
Written in the Cottage where Burns was

born, 121.
Written on the Blank Space at the End of

Chaucer's Tale of The Floure and the Lefe, 36.
Written on the Day that Mr. Leigh Hunt left

Prison, 5.
Written upon the Top of Ben Nevis, 123.
Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, 27.
Spenser, Imitation of, 1.
Spenserian Stanza, written at the close of Canto

II., Book V., of The Faerie Queene, 8.
Spenserian Stanzas on Charles Armitage Brown,

250.
Spenser, To, 42.
Stanzas : ‘In a drear-nighted December,' 34.
Stanzas to Miss Wylie, 240.
SUPPLEMENTARY VERSE, 233.

To ‘Hadst thou liv'd in days of old,' 11.
To a Cat, 252.
To Autumn, 213.
To Fanny, 215.
To Homer, 119.
To Hope, 5.
To John Hamilton Reynolds, 44.
To Leigh Hunt, Esq., 37.
To Sleep, 142.
To Some Ladies, 3.
To Spenser, 42.
To the Nile, 41.
To Thomas Keats, 245.
Translation from a Sonnet of Ronsard, 123.
Two or Three Posies, 251.

a

VERSES TO FANNY BRAWNE, 214.
Verses written during a Tour in Scotland, 120.

'Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow,' 42.
What the Thrush said, 43.

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Where's the Poet? Show him show him,'

238.
Woman! when I behold thee, flippant, vain,'2.
Written in Answer to a Sonnet, 43.
Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, 35.
Written in the Cottage where Burns was born,

121.

Written on the Blank Space at the End of

Chaucer's Tale of The Floure and the Lefe,

36.
Written on the Day that Mr. Leigh Hunt left

Prison, 5.
Written upon the Top of Ben Nevis, 123.
Wylie, Miss, Stanzas 240.

INDEX TO LETTERS

AGRICULTURE, the effect of, on character, 392,

393.
Ailsa Rock, 312.
Amena's letters to Tom Keats, 364, 366.
America, in its relation to England, 332.

told to Fanny Keats, 264; draws near a close,
269; a test of his power of imagination, 270 ;
completed, 281 ; to serve as a pioneer, 289 ;

preface to, 296.
Examiner, The, a battering ram against Chris-

tianity, 258 ; has a good word on Wellington,
262; Keats's notice in it of Reynolds's Peter
Bell, 367.

Fingal's Cave, 322.
French Revolution, Keats on the, 398.

Godwin, William, 346.
Goldfish, Keats's fancy of a globe of, 372.
Greek, Keats wishes to learn, 299.

Bailey, Benjamin, entertains Keats at Oxford,

264; has a curacy, 271 ; his love affairs, 357 ;
letters to, 270, 271, 273, 283, 290, 303, 305, 318,

387.
Ben Nevis, ascent of, 323, 324.
Brawne, Fanny, first met by Keats, 340 ; de-

scribed by Keats, 342; tiffs with, 353; ar-
dently loved by Keats, 380, and in subse-
quent letters commended to Brown, 448 ;
letters to, 380, 382, 383, 384, 386, 388, 393, 413,
414, 423, 424, 425, 426, 427, 428, 429, 430, 432,

433, 436, 438, 440, 441.
Brawne, Mrs., takes Brown's house, 340; Keats

dines with her, 345; letter to, 446.
Brown, Charles Armitage, Letters to, 410, 411,

437, 444, 445, 447, 448.
Burford Bridge, 275.
Burns, Robert, visit to the country of, 308, 310,

313, 315.
Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, quoted, 397.

Carisbrooke, Isle of Wight, 257.
Charmian, 331.
Chatterton, Thomas, Keats inscribes Endymion

to his memory, 297 ; thinks his the purest

English, 404.
Christ, Keats's thoughts on, 363.
Claret, the charms of, 356.
Clarke, Charles Cowden, Letters to, 255.
Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, 272, 277.
Cornwall, Barry, 431.
Cripps, Mr., 269, 272, 275, 279, 281.

Haslam, William, letter to, 375.
Haydon, Benjamin Roberts, Keats's first ac-

quaintance with, 255 ; advises Keats to go
into the country, 255 ; his quarrel with Hunt,
270 ; proposes to make a frontispiece for En-
dymion, 281 ; his effect on Keats, 296 ; money
affairs with, 350 ; letters to, 260, 269, 279, 293,
295, 349, 350, 351, 371, 373, 379, 412, 440, 443.
Hazlitt, William, on Southey, 259; thinks

Shakespeare enough for us, 261 ; his Round
Table, 269; his essay on commonplace peo-
ple, 272 ; his lecture on poetry, 287, 289;
prosecutes Blackwood, 327; his letter to Gif-

ford, 358 ; his retort, 359.
Hessey, James Augustus, letter to, 328.
Hunt, Leigh, self-delusions of, 261; his quarrel
with Haydon, 270 ;

in Edinburgh
Magazine, 273; his own name coupled with,

his criticism of Endymion, 282; shows
Keats a lock of Milton's hair, 284; his char-
acter, 341; his conversation quoted, 343; let-

ter to, 258.
Hyperion, has too many Miltonic inversions, 408.

attack on,

273;

ney,

Indiaman, Keats's prospect of service on an,

377.

Dante, Keats proposes to take him on a jour-

306.
Devonshire, Keats's opinion of, 290, 292, 294.
Dilke, Charles Wentworth, interest of in his

boy's education, 356 ; his absorption in his
boy, 365, 386, 396 ; his character, 405; letters
to, 273, 326, 351, 385, 409, 412, 431, 436.

Jeffrey, Misses M. and S., letter to, 304.
Jeffrey, Mrs., letters to, 303, 376, 377.

Elmes, James, letter to, 378.
Endymion, begun by Keats, 260 ; the story of,

Kean, Edmund, in Richard III., 276; dis-

cussed, 277.
Keats, Fanny, letters to, 264, 308, 325, 326, 328,

ter, 336.

337, 338, 350, 351, 352, 371, 372, 373, 374, works with Brown on a tragedy, 389; de-
375, 376, 378, 379, 381, 390, 414, 416, 417, 418, scribes Winchester, 391 ; goes up to London,
423, 424, 425, 427, 429, 433, 434, 435, 438, 439, 393; returns to Winchester, 394 ; describes
440, 442, 444.

an election there, 400; plays a joke on Brown,
Keats, George, his resolution to go to America, 406 ; gives up Hyperion, 408 ; returns to town,

303; his marriage, 305 ; arrival in America, 413; is attacked with illness, 423; is ordered

336 ; return to England on a brief visit, 418. to Italy, 439; reaches Rome, 448.
Keats, George and Thomas, Letters to, 256, 276, Keats, Thomas, sickness of, 275, 335, 337; his
277, 280, 281, 286, 288.

death, 338; his affair with Wells, 364 ; letters
Keats, George and Georgiana, letters to, 329, to, 307, 310, 312, 316, 320, 322.

338, 353, 394, 418.
Keats, John, goes to Southampton, 256; visits Milton, John, influence of, on the world, 294 ;

Carisbrooke, 257; cannot exist without po- compared with Wordsworth, 301.
etry, 258 ; begins Endymion, 258 ; habits of
reading and writing, 260; is painted in a pic- Orinda, the Matchless, referred to and quoted,
ture by Haydon, 261 ; borrows money of Tay- 268.
lor and Hessey, 262; leaves Margate for Can- | Oxford, visited by Keats, 264; described by
terbury, 262; asks for more money, 263; goes him, 264.
to Oxford, 263; rows on the Isis, 267 ; makes
good progress with Endymion, 269; goes to Philips, Mrs., author of The Matchless Orinda,
Hampstead, 270; regards his long poem as 268.
a test of power of imagination, 270; is at Poetry, Keats cannot exist without, 258 ; unable
Dorking, 275; reads Shakespeare's sonnets, to talk of it, 261; the quality of length in,
276; criticises West's painting of Death on 270, 271 ; a few axioms concerning, 289; the
the Pale Horse, 277; writes articles for relief brought by, 328; its effect on charac-
The Champion, 277; calls on Wordsworth,
278; passes in the first book of Endymion, Psyche, on Ode to, 371.
281; goes to hear Hazlitt lecture on poetry,
282 ; his recipe for a pleasant life, 286 ; is Quarterly, The, attempt of, to crush Keats, 330.
reading Voltaire and Gibbon, 289; goes to
Devonshire, 290; goes to Honiton, 303; re- Religion, Keats's ideas about, 291.
turns to Hampstead, 303; goes to Keswick Reynolds, Jane, letters to, 265, 326.
by way of Ambleside, 307; climbs Skiddaw Reynolds, John Hamilton, letters to, 255, 257,
and goes to Carlisle, 307; visits the haunts of 267, 269, 275, 285, 287, 292, 299, 314, 327, 390,
Burns, 308; visits the Meg Merrilies country, 428.
309; crosses to Ireland, 311 ; sees Ailsa crag, Reynolds, Mariane and Jane, letter to, 263.
312; goes to Glasgow, 313; rehearses his Reynolds, Mrs., letter to, 349.
route, 314; traverses Loch Lomond, 316; in Rice, James, letters to, 294, 337, 416, 426.
view of the Hebrides, 317 ; reaches Inverary,
318; comes to the Isle of Mull, 319; crosses Scott, Walter, Keats's opinion of, 279.
the isle, 321; visits Fingal's Cave, 322 ; Severn, Joseph, a friend of Keats, 255; letters
climbs Ben Nevis, 323; returns to Hamp- to, 373, 415, 416.
stead, 325 ; recounts his passage from Inver- Shakespeare, Keats finds a head of, 257; ob-
ness, 330; has an encounter with an unnamed serving his birthday, 258, 287 ; his Christian-
Lady, 334; notifies his brother George of ity, 259; a presiding genius, 260 ; enough for
their brother Tom's death, 338; meets Fanny us, 261 ; his sonnets, 276; supposed seal of,
Brawne for the first time, 340 ; describes her, 293.
342; borrows money of Taylor, 349; lends Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 'telling strange stories
money to Haydon, 350; goes to Chichester, of the deaths of kings,' 259 ; his Queen Mab,
353; goes to the consecration of a chapel, 277 ; letter to, 442.
355 ; considers the question of going to Edin- Snook, Mr., 267, 353, 354.
burgh and studying medicine, 361; considers Soul-making, 369.
also the plan of going as surgeon on an India- Southampton, journey to, 256.
man, is obliged to refuse money to Hay- Staffer, 318, 320, 321.
don, 379; goes to Shanklin, Isle of Wight,
380 ; describes his life there, 381 ; goes to Taylor, Anne and Jane, poems by,
Winchester, 387; engaged on Hyperion, 387; Taylor and Hessey, letters to, 262, 263, 290, 293.

377 ;

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