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BIBLIOGRAPHICAL LIST OF KEATS'S POEMS

In this list the contents are given in their order of the three volumes published by Keats. Then follow the poems gathered by Lord Houghton, and those printed for the first time in the Letters, collected by Mr. Forman, Mr. Colvin, and Mr. Speed. The few instances of independent periodical publication of poems, and of those gathered by Mr. Forman, are noted in the head-notes to those poems.

TO

WITH

XI. On first Looking into Chapman's

Homer. XII. On leaving some friends at an early

hour. XIII. Addressed to Haydon. XIV, Addressed to the same.

XV. On the Grasshopper and Cricket. XVI. To Kosciusko, XVII. ‘Happy is England.' Sleep and Poetry. II. ENDYMION:| A POETIC ROMANCE. | By JOHN KEATS. / 'THE STRETCHED METRE OF AN ANTIQUE SONG.' | LONDON: | PRINTED FOR TAYLOR AND HESSEY, | 93, FLEET

STREET, | 1818. III. LAMIA | ISABELLA, | THE EVE OF St.

AGNES, | AND OTHER POEMS. | By JOHN KEATS, | AUTHOR OF ENDYMION. | LONDON:

| PRINTED FOR TAYLOR AND HESSEY, I FLEET STREET | 1820. Lamia. Isabella ; or the Pot of Basil. The Eve of St. Agnes. Ode to a Nightingale. Ode on a Grecian Urn. Ode to Psyche. Fancy. Ode [' Bards of Passion and of Mirth'). Lines on the Mermaid Tavern. Robin Hood. To a Friend, To Autumn. Ode on Melancholy. Hyperion : a Fragment. IV. LIFE, LETTERS AND LITERARY RE

MAINS OF JOHN KEATS. EDITED BY RICHARD MONCKTON MILNES (AFTERWARD LORD HOUGHTON).

[The following were incorporated in the biographical portion.] To Spenser. To Chatterton. To Byron. On seeing the Elgin Marbles. To Haydon, with the above. On seeing a lock of Milton's Hair.

Draught of Suns What the Thrush said.

.

I. POEMS, | BY JOHN KEATS. I'WHAT MORE FELICITY CAN FALL TO CREATURE, I THAN ENJOY DELIGHT

LIBERTY' | Fate of the Butterfly. - SPENSER. | LONDON: | PRINTED FOR C. & J. OLLIER, 3 WELBECK STREET, | CAVENDISH SQUARE.

| 1817. Dedication. To Leigh Hunt, esq. 'I stood tip-toe upon a little hill.' Specimen of an Induction to a Poem. Calidore. A Fragment. To Some Ladies. On receiving a curious shell, and a Copy of

Verses from the same Ladies.
To [Hadst thou liv'd in days of old).
To Hope.
Imitation of Spenser.
*Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain,'
Epistles:

To George Felton Mathew.
To my Brother George.

To Charles Cowden Clarke.
Sonnets:

I. To my Brother George.
II. To ['Had I a man's fair form, then

might my sighs.']
III. Written on the day that Mr. Leigh

Hunt left prison.
IV. 'How many bards gild the lapses of

time.'
V. To a Friend who sent me some roses.
VI. To G. A. W.
VII. “O Solitude, if I must with thee dwell.'
VIII. To

my

Brothers. IX. *Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here

and there.' X. To one who has been long in city

pent.'

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BIBLIOGRAPHICAL LIST OF KEATS'S POEMS

The Eve of St. Mark.
To Fanny: ‘Physician Nature ! let my spirit

blood.'
Stanzas : ‘In a drear-nighted December.'
Sonnets :

Oh, how I love on a fair summer's eve.' *To a Young Lady who sent me a laurel

crown.'

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On sitting down to read King Lear once again.
To the Nile.
Epistle to John Hamilton Reynolds.
Fragment of an Ode to Maia.
On visiting the Tomb of Burns.
Written in the Cottage where Burns was born.
Meg Merrilies.
On Ailsa Rock.
Lines written in the Highlands after a visit to

Burns's cottage.
At Fingal's Cave.
Written upon the top of Ben Nevis.
A Prophecy: To George Keats in America.
Translation from a Sonnet of Ronsard.
Spenserian stanzas on Charles Armitage Brown.
Spenserian stanza written at the end of Canto

II. Book V. of The Faerie Queene. Fragments :

• Where's the Poet? show him! show him!' Modern Love. The Castle Builder. •Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow.' Ode to Fanny.

[The following were grouped in the section Literary Remains] :

Otho the Great.
King Stephen.
The Cap and Bells.
Ode to Apollo.
Hymn to Apollo.
On -: 'Think not of it, sweet one, so.'
Lines: “Unfelt, unheard, unseen.'
Song : ‘Hush, hush ! tread softly.'
Song: 'I had a dove and the sweet dove

died.' Faery song: 'Shed no tear! O, shed no

tear.'
Song: "Spirit here that reignest.'
Faery song: 'Ah! woe is me.'
Extracts from an Opera.
La Belle Dame sans Merci.
Song of Four Faeries.
Ode on Indolence.

• After dark vapours have oppress'd our

plains.' Written on the Blank space at the end of

Chaucer's Tale of The Floure and the Lefe. On the Sea. On Leigh Hunt's poem The Story of Rimini. When I have fears that I may cease to be.' To Homer. Written in answer to a sonnet. To J. H. Reynolds. To : Time's sea hath been five years

at its slow ebb.' To Sleep. On Fame. Another on Fame. • Why did I laugh to-night?' A Dream, after reading Dante's Episode of

Paolo and Francesca. *If by dull rhymes our English must be

chain'd.' • The day is gone,

and all its sweets are gone.' 'I cry your mercy - pity - love ! - aye, love.'

The Last Sonnet.
V. THE LETTERS OF JOHN KEATS:

Acrostic: Georgiana Augusta Wylie.
At Teignmouth.
Mrs. Cameron and Ben Nevis.
The Devon Maid.
A Little Extempore.
The Gadfly.
The Human Seasons.
To Thomas Keats.
A Party of Lovers.
A Song about Myself.
Two or Three Posies.

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INDEX OF FIRST LINES

a

AFTER dark vapours have oppress'd our plains,

36.
Ah! ken ye what I met the day, 245.
Ah, what can ail thee, wretched wight, 139.
Ah! woe is me! poor silver wing ! 141.
All gentle folks who owe a grudge, 245.
And what is love? It is a doll dress'd up, 238.
As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, 12.
As Hermes once took to his feathers light, 138.
As late I rambled in the happy fields, 13.
Asleep! O sleep a little while, white pearl !

240.
A thing of beauty is a joy forever, 49.

а.

Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs,

26.
Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, 11.
Happy, happy glowing fire! 140.
Happy is England ! I could be content, 35.
Hast thou from the caves of Golconda, a gem, 4.
Haydon ! forgive me that I cannot speak, 36.
Hearken, thou craggy ocean pyramid, 121.
He is to weet a melancholy Carle, 250.
Hence Burgundy, Claret, and Port, 242.
Here all the summer could I stay, 242.
Highmindedness, a jealousy for good, 33.
How fever'd is the man, who cannot look, 142.
How many bards gild the lapses of time! 8.
Hush, hush! tread softly! hush, hush, my

dear! 120.

Bards of Passion and of Mirth, 125.
Blue ! 'Tis the life of heaven, — the domain, 43.
Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art,

232.
Brother belov'd, if health shall smile again, 252.
Byron ! how sweetly sad thy melody! 2.

Can death be sleep, when life is but a dream, 1.
Cat! who has[t] pass’d thy grand climacteric,

252.
Chief of organic numbers, 39.
Come hither all sweet maidens soberly, 38.

I cry your mercy-pity - love ! - aye, love, 215.
If by dull rhymes our English must be chain’d,

144.
If shame can on a soldier's vein-swoll'n front,

192.
I had a dove and the sweet dove died, 125.
In a drear-nighted December, 34.
In after-time, a sage of mickle lore, 9.
In midmost Ind, beside Hydaspes cool, 216.
In the wide sea there lives a forlorn wretch, 89.
In thy western halls of gold, 6.
I stood tiptoe upon a little hill, 14.
It keeps eternal whisperings around, 37.

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Dear Reynolds! as last night I lay in bed, 241.
Deep in the shady sadness of a vale, 199.

Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there,

8.
King of the stormy sea, 93.

Lo! I must tell a tale of chivalry, 27.

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Many the wonders I this day have seen, 26.
Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia,

119.
Much have I travell'd in the realms of gold, 9.
My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains,

144.
My spirit is too weak – mortality, 36.

Ever let the Fancy roam, 124.

Fair Isabel, poor simple Isabel, 110.
Fame, like a wayward girl, will still be coy,

142.
Fanatics have their dreams, wherewith they
weave,

233.
Four Seasons fill the measure of the year, 44.
Fresh morning gusts have blown away all

fear, 7.
Full many a dreary hour have I past, 24.

Give me a golden pen and let me lean, 9.
Give me your patience, sister, while I frame,

243,
Glory and loveliness have pass’d away, 37.
God of the golden-bow, 7.
Good Kosciusko, thy great name alone, 34.
Great spirits now on earth are sojourning, 33.

Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, 123.
No, no, go not to Lethe, neither twist, 126.
Not Aladdin magian, 122.
No! those days are gone away,

41.

Now morning from her orient chamber came, 1. The church bells toll a melancholy round, 35.
Nymph of the downward smile and sidelong The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, 214.
glance, 34.

The Gothic looks solemn, 252.

The poetry of earth is never dead, 35.
O Arethusa, peerless nymph! why fear, 77. There is a charm in footing slow across a silent
O blush not so ! O blush not so, 248.

plain, 246.
O Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, 2.

There was a naughty Boy, 244.
O come Georgiana! the rose is full blown, 240. The stranger lighted from his steed, 240.
Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, 246. The sun, with his great eye, 239.
Oft have you seen a swan superbly frowning, 30. The Town, the churchyard, and the setting sun,
O Goddess ! hear these tuneless numbers, wrung, 120.
143.

Think not of it, sweet one, so, 38.
O golden-tongued Romance, with serene lute ! This mortal body of a thousand days, 122.
40.

This pleasant tale is like a little copse, 36.
Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, 13. Thou still unravish'd bride of quietness, 135.
0, I am frightend with most hateful thoughts ! Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb,
240.

124.
Old Meg she was a Gipsy, 243.

'Tis the witching time of night, 249.
One morn before me were three figures seen, To-night I'll have my friar – let me think,
136.

239.
O soft embalmer of the still midnight, 142. To one who has been long in city pent, 13.
O Solitude ! if I must with thee dwell, 12. Two or three Posies, 251.
O Sorrow, 96.
O that a week could be an age, and we, 44. Unfelt, unheard, unseen,

38.
O thou whose face hath felt the Winter's wind, Upon a Sabbath-day it fell, 196.
43,

Upon a time, before the faery broods, 146.
O thou, whose mighty palace roof doth hang, Upon my Life, Sir Nevis, I am piqued, 247,

52.
O! were I one of the Olympian twelve, 239. Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, 42,

What can I do to drive away, 214.
Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, What is more gentle than a wind in summer ? 18.
251.

What though, for showing truth to flatter'd
Physician Nature ! let my spirit blood ! 137. state, 5.

What though, while the wonders of nature ex-
Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, ploring, 3.
123.

When by my solitary hearth I sit, 5.

When I have fears that I may cease to be, 39.
St. Agnes' Eve – Ah, bitter chill it was ! 127. When they were come into the Faery's Court,
Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, 213. 249.
Shed no tear – O shed no tear, 141.

When wedding fiddles are a-playing, 240.
Small, busy flames play through the fresh laid Where be ye going, you Devon maid ? 243.
coals, 33.

Where's the Poet? show him ! show him, 238.
So, I am safe emerged from these broils ! 159. Who loves to peer up at the morning sun, 39.
Son of the old moon-mountains African ! 41 Who, who from Dian's feast would be away ?
Souls of Poets dead and gone, 40.

102.
Spenser ! a jealous honourer of thine, 42, Why did I laugh to-night? No voice will tell,
Spirit here that reignest! 42.

137.
Standing aloof in giant ignorance, 119.

Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, 2.
Sweet are the pleasures that to verse belong,
10.

Young Calidore is paddling o'er the lake, 28.

INDEX OF TITLES

[The titles of major works and general divisions are set in SMALL CAPI

PITALS.]

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Acrostic: Georgiana Augusta Wylie, 243.
Addressed to Benjamin Robert Haydon, 33.
* Ah! woe is me! poor silver-wing !' 141.
Ailsa Rock, To, 121.
Apollo, Hymn to, 7.
Apollo, Ode to, 6.
* Asleep! O sleep a little while, white pearl!'

240.
At Fingal's Cave, 122.
At Teignmouth, 242.
Autumn, To, 213.

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Bagpipe, On hearing the, and seeing The

Stranger, 246.
Bards of Passion and of Mirth,' 125.
Beaumont and Fletcher's Works, Song written

on a Blank Page in, 42.
Belle Dame sans Merci, La, 139.
Ben Nevis, Mrs. Cameron and, 247.
Ben Nevis, Written upon the Top of, 123.
BRAWNE, FANNY, VERSES TO, 214.
Brother George, To my, 26.
Brothers, To my, 33.
Brown, Charles Armitage, Spenserian Stanzas

on, 250.

Burns, On visiting the Tomb of, 120.
Byron, To, 2.

Calidore : a Fragment, 28.
Cameron, Mrs., and Ben Nevis, 247.
CAP AND BELLS, THE, 216.
• Castle Builder, The,' Fragment of, 239.
Cat, To a, 252.
Chapman's Homer, On first looking into, 9.
Chatterton, To, 2.
Chaucer's Tale of The Floure and the Lefe,

Written on the Blank Space at the End of, 36.
Chorus of Fairies, 140.
Clarke, Charles Cowden, Epistle to, 30.
Cottage where Burns was born, Written in the,

121.
Curious Shell and a Copy of Verses, On receiv-

a

Draught of Sunshine, A, 243.
Dream after reading Dante's Episode of Paolo

and Francesca, A, 138.

EARLY POEMS, 1.
Elgin Marbles, On seeing the, 36.
ENDYMION, 45.
Epistles :

To Charles Cowden Clarke, 30.
To George Felton Mathew, 9.
To John Hamilton Reynolds, 240.

To my Brother George, 24.
Eve of St. Agnes, The, 127.
Eve of St. Mark, The, 196.
Eve's Apple, Sharing, 248.
Extempore, A Little, 249.
Extracts from an Opera, 239.

ing a, 4.

Faery Songs, 141.
Fairies, Chorus of, 140.
Fame, On, 142.
Fame, On, Another, 142.
FAMILIAR VERSES, 240.
Fancy, 124.
Fanny, Lines to, 214.
Fanny, Ode to, 137.
Fanny, To, 215.
Fingal's Cave, At, 122.
Folly's Song, 240.
Fragments :

Extracts from an Opera, 239.
Modern Love, 238.
Of an Ode to Maia, 119.
The Castle Builder, 239.
Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow,' 42.
• Where's the Poet ? show him! show him,'

238.
Friend, To a, who sent me Some Roses, 13.

Gadfly, The, 245.
G. A. W., To, 34.
George, Epistle to my Brother, 24.
George, To my Brother, 26.
Grasshopper and Cricket, On the, 35.
Grecian Urn, Ode on a, 134.

Daisy's Song, 239.
Death, On, 1.
Devon Maid, The, 243.
DRAMAS, 158.

Haydon, Benjamin Robert, Addressed to, 33.
Haydon, To, 36.

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