Imatges de pàgina
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• 189

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. ib.

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271

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94

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Pago
Tenure of judges

145 Interpretation of treaties .
Courts there, how organized ib. Consequences of their violation 190
Jurisdiction vested in the sever- Effect of partial violations ib.
al courts

ib. How such effect prevented ib.
Special jurisdiction of certain Power of annulling treaties
territorial courts
ib. Effect of its exercise

ib.

States restricted in regard to
TERRITORIAL REGULATIONS.

them
Power of disposing of and reg- See Powers of GOVERNMENT,

ulating territory and other PRESIDENT OF U.S., SENATE,

property of the Union 262 &c.
Condition annexed to it

263
Construction of power

ib.

VICE-PRESIDENT OF U.S.
See POWERS OF GOVERNMENT. His powers in cases of impeach-

ment

78
TITLES OF NOBILITY.

How chosen, and qualifications 90
Power of granting, prohibited For what term elected

91
to the states.

271 How appointed in case of no

choice by electors .
TREASON.

His duties as President of Senate ib.
Power to declare its punish-

When to act as President of
ment
259 U.S.

95
Treason against U. S. defined 260 Evidence of his refusal to ac-
Evidence requisite to convict . 261 cept

ib.
Judicial constructions

ib. How long he continues to act
Treason against a state
ib. as President of U.S.

ib.
Effect of a confession

ib.
Punishment of treason against

WAR.
U.S.

262 Whence right of declaring it
derived.

151
TREATIES.
Causes of war

ib.
Nature of power to make 180 Forms of declaring it

ib.
To what extent declared su- Power of declaring it, where
183 vested

ib.
How and where the power is In what mode declared :

ib.
vested

ib. Effect of declaration
How treaties are to be con- “Levying war”—what 260
strued

188
How defined by law of nations ib.

WeighTS AND MEASURES.
How regarded by courts of U.S. ib. Power to fix standards

226
Their effect and operation
ib. How far exclusive

227
Power of Congress orer them . 189
Obligation of treaties

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preme law

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. 152

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ib.

WRITS OF ERROR.
Extent of the power

ib. See SUPREME COURT.

THE END,

A COURSE OF LECTURES ON THE CONSTITUTIONAL JURIS

PRUDENCE OF TẢE UNITED STATES, delivered annually in Columbia College, New-York, by William AlEXANDER DUER, LL.D., late President of that Insti tution.

From Mr. Madison.

“Montpelier, Sept. 4th, 1833. “DEAR SIR-I have received your letter of the 28th ultimo, enclosing the outlines of your work on the Constitutional Jurisprudence of the United States. The object of the work is certainly important and well chosen, and the plan marked out in the analysis gives full scope to the instructive execution which is anticipated. I am very sensible, sir, of the friendly respect which suggested my name for the distinguished use made of it, and am not less so of the too partial terms which are applied to it. I shall receive, sir, with great thankfulness, the promised volume, with the outlines of which I have been favoured; though such is the shattered state of my health, added to the eighty-three years of my age, that I fear I may be little able to bestow on it all the attention I might wish, and doubt not it will deserve. “With great respect and cordial salutations,

“James Madison."

From Chief-justice Marshall.

“Washington, March 17, 1834. “ DEAR SIR-I had the pleasure of receiving, at the commencement of the session of the Supreme Court, your “Outlines of the Constitutional Jurisprudence of the United States,” for which I am greatly indebted to you.

“The pressure of official duty has been such as not to leave me leisure enough to give it that attentive perusal to which it has the fairest claim. That agreeable task must be deferred until my return to Virginia. I have, however, passed rapidly through it, and that rapid glance has satisfied me of the value of the work, and the correctness of its principles and statements. I wish very much that this and similar works could be introduced into all our serninaries for education. In a government like ours, it is of the last

importance that early impressions should be just. Permit me to thank you for this flattering mark of your attention, and to make my acknowledgments for the kind and partial manner in which you speak of the Chief-justice of the United States in your pref

With very great respect and esteem,
“I am, sir, your ob't,

“ J. MARSHALL.”

ace.

From Edward Livingston, late U. S. Minister to France.

“ Paris, Nov. 220, 1833 “My dear SIR-I am very much obliged to you for your very valuable little book. It is a work of great use, and must attract great attention in Europe, where all our institutions are scanned, and their operation watched, from different motives, by friends and foes. You are now instructing a royal pupil. Last night, at the Tuileries, the Duc d'Orleans asked me many questions respecting our Constitution and Laws, and seemed so desirous of obtaining correct information, that I told him I had just received from a learn. ed friend a small volume, in which all he required to know could be found, and having obtained permission, I sent him your work. “I am, dear sir, with high regard, your friend and servant,

“ Edw. LIVINGSTON."

From Mons. de Tocqueville. “SIR-I have received the work which you had the goodness to send us, and will not await the return of M. de Beaumont to express in his name, as well as my own, our gratitude for it. The work you address to us, sir, appears to me to be eminently calculated for the purpose to which you destine it. It demonstrates, with as much clearness as precision, the Federal Constitution; and although short, is not superficial. I have no doubt but that it would excite a very great curiosity in France, if the knowledge of the English language was more general among us. For my part, sir, I have personal reasons for offering you my thanks. I am occupied at present with a work upon the American Institutions, and consider your book one of my best documents. “I am, very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

“ALEXIS DE TOCQUEVILLE.” Paris, November 24th, 1833."

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