Imatges de pÓgina
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Bru. Caius Ligarius, that Metellus fpoke of. Boy, stand aside. Caius Ligarius ! how? Cai. Vouchsafe good-morrow from a feeble

tongue. Bru. O what a tiine have you chose out, brave

Caius,
To wear a kerchief? would you were not fick!

Cai, I am not sick, if Brutus have in hand
Any exploit worthy the name of honour.

Bru. Such an exploit have I in hand, Ligarius, Had you an healthful ear to hear of it.

Cai. By all the gods the Romans bow before, I here discard my fickness. Soul of Rome! Brave son, derived from honourable loins! Thou, like an exorcist, hast conjured up My mortified fpirit. Now bid me run, And I will strive with things impoffible, Yea, get the better of them. What's to do? Bru. A piece of work that will make fick meo

whole. Cai. But are not come whole that we must make

fick ?
Bru. That must we also. What it is, my Caius,
I shall unfold to thee as we are going,
To whom it must be done.

Cai. Set on your foot,
And with a heart new-fir'd I follow your,
To do I know not what: but it sufficetli,
That Brutus leads me on.
Bru. Follow me then.

[Exeuwi.

SCENE changes to Cæfar's Palace. Thunder and Lightning. Enter JULIUS CÆSAR. Cef. Nor heaven, nor earth, have been at peace

to-night;

ed me,

Thrice hath Calphurnia in her sleep cried out, Help, ho! they murder Cæfar." Who's within

Enter a Servant.
Ser. My Lord ?----

Cæf. Go bid the priests do present facrifice,
And bring me their opinions of success.,
Ser, I will, my Lord.

[Exit. Enter CALPHURNIA. Cal. What mean you, Cæfar? think you to walk

forth? You shall not stir out of your house to-day?

Cæf. Cæsar shall forth; the things that threatenNe’er look'd but on my back; when they shall see The face of Cæfar, they are vanquished.

Cal. Cæfar, I never stood on ceremonies,
Yet now they fright me: there is one within,
(Besides the things that we have heard and feen)
Kecuunts moft horrid fights seen by the watch.
A lioness hath whelped in the streets,
And graves have yawned, and yielded up their dead;
Fierce fiery warriors fight upon the clouds,
In ranks and squadrons and right form of war,
Which drizzled blood upon the Capitol:
The noile of battle hurtled in the air ;
Horses did neigh, and dying men did groan;
And ghosts did shriek and squeal about the Itreets.
O Cæfar! these things are beyond all use,
And I do fear them.

Caf. What can be avoided,
Whole end is purposed by the mighty gods?
Yet Cæfar ihall go forth: for these predictions
Are to the world in general as to Cæfar.

Cel. When beggars die there are no comets seen;

The heavens themselves blaze forth the death of

princes. Gæf. Cowards die many times before their deaths, The valiant never taste of death but once : Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, It seems to me most ftrange, that men should fear: Seeing that death, a neceffary end, Will come when it will come.

Enter a Servant. What say the Augurs?

Ser. They would not have you to stir forth toPlucking the entrails of an offering forth, [day: They could not find a heart within the beat.

[Exit Servant. Caf. The gods do this in shame of cowardile : Cæfar should be a beast without a heart, If he should stay at home to-day for fear. No, Cæfar shall not; Danger knows full well, That Cæfar is more dangerous than he. (15) We were two lions littered in one day, And I.the elder and more terrible; And Cæfar shall

go

forth. (15). We heard two lions-) The first Folio-We hearer The copies have been all corrupt, and the passage, of course, unintelligible. But the fight alteration I have made seftores fente to the whole, and the sentiment will neither be unworthy of Shakespeare, nor the boast too extravagant for Cæsar in vein of vanity to utter; that he and Danger were twin-whelps of a lion, and he the elder and more rerrible of the iwo. A finilar thought again occurs in Antony and Cleopatra, about victory for a while standing suspended betwixt two armies ;

When vantage like a pair of twins appeared,

Both as the same, or sather curs the elder. I made this emendation formerly in my shakespeare Restosed; and the ingenious Dr Thirlby, without baving seco it, Itruck out the lame conjecture.

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Cal. Alas, my Lord,
Your wisdom is consumed in confidence :
Do not go forth to-day; call it my fear
That keeps you in the house, and not your own.
We'll send Mark Antony to the senate-house,
And he will say you are not well to-day:
Let me, upon my knee, prevail in this.

Cæf: Mark Antony. shall say I am not well;
And for thy humour I will stay at home.

Enter DECIUS.
Here's Decius Brutus, he shall tell them fo.

Dec. Cæfar, all hail ! good-morrow, worthy
I come to fetch you to the Senate-house. [Cæfar;

Caf. And you are come in very happy time,
To bear my greeting to the senators,
And tell them that I will not come to-day.
Cannot, is false; and that I dare not, falser:
I will not come to-day; tell them fo, Decius.

Cal. Say he is sick.

Cæf. Shall Cæfar send a lie?
Have I in conquest stretch'd mine arm fo far,
To be afraid to tell grey-beards the truth?
Decius, go tell them Cæfar will not come.

Dec. Most mighty Cæfar, let me know some cause,
Left I he laugh'd at when I tell them fo.

Caf. The cause is in my will, I will not come;
That is enough to satisfy the Senate.
But for your private satisfaction,
Because I love you, I will let you

know.
Calphurnia here, my wife, stays me at home:
She dream'd last night she faw my ftatue,
Which, like a fountain, with a hundred spouts,
Did run pure blood; and many lusty Romans
Came smiling, and did bathe their hands in it.
These the applies for warnings and portents,

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And evils imminent; and on her knee
Hath begged that I will stay at home to-day.

Dec. This dreann is all amiss interpreted;
It was a vision fair and fortunate : ,
Your statue, fpouting blood in mary pipes,
In which so many smiling Romans baihed,
Signifies, that from you great Rome shall fuck
Reviving blood; and that great men thall press
For tinčtures, stains, relicks, and cognisance.
This by Calphurnia's dream is signified.

Cæs. And this way have you well expounded it.

Dec. I have, when you have heard what l can And know it now, the fenate have concluded (fay; To give this day a crown to mighty Cæfar. lf

you shall send them word you will not come, Their minds may change. Besides, it were a mock Apt to be rendered, for some one to say, Break up the Senate 'till. another time, " When Cæfar's wife shall meet with better dreams." If Cæsar hide himself, thall they not whisper, "'Lo, Cæfar is afraid !” Pardon ine, Cæsar; for

my dear, dear love To your proceeding bids me tell you this: And reason to my love is liable.

C.<f. How foolith' do your fears feem now, CalI am ashamed I did yield to them... Give me my robe, for I will

go: Enter BRUTUS, LIGARIUS, METELLUS, CASCA,

TREBONÍUS, CINNA and PUBLIUS. And look where Publius is come to fetch me.

Pub. Good-morrow, Cæsar.

Cef: Welcome, Publius.
What, Brutus, are you stirred so early too?
Good morrow, Casca : Caius Ligarius,
Cæfar was ne'er so much your enemy,

[phurnia?

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