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, — and soon discoursed both her Life to her was no alternation of joy and me into repose.

and grief, but only of joy and more When I waked again, it was to find joyous. the child conversing with the morning Twilight brought us to an improvised star, which still shone through the win- concert. Climbing the piano-stool, she dow, scarcely so lucent as her eyes, went over the notes with her little taper and bidding it go home to its mother, fingers, touching the keys in a light, the sun. Another lapse into dreams, knowing way, that proved her a musiand then a more vivid awakening, and

cian's child Then I must play for her, she had my ear at last, and won story and let the dance begin. This was a after story, requiting them with legends wondrous performance on her part, and of her own youth, “almost a year ago," consisted at first in hopping up and down - how she was perilously lost, for in- on one spot, with no change of motion, stance, in the small front yard, with a but in her hands. She resembled a little playmate, early in the afternoon, minute and irrepressible Shaker, or a and how they came and peeped into the live and beautiful marionnette. Then window, and thought all the world had she placed Janet in the middle of the forgotten them. Then the sweet voice, foor, and performed the dance round distinct in its articulation as Laura's, her, after the manner of Vivien and went straying off into wilder fancies, a Merlin. Then came her supper, which, chaos of autobiography and conjecture, like its predecessors, was a solid and like the letters of a war correspondent. absorbing meal; then one more fairy You would have thought her little life story, to magnetize her off

, and she had yielded more pangs and fears than danced and sang herself upstairs. might have sufficed for the discovery And if she first came to me in the of the North Pole; but breakfast-time morning with a halo round her head, drew near at last, and Janet's honest she seemed still to retain it when I at voice was heard outside the door. I last watched her kneeling in the little rather envied the good Scotchwoman bed — perfectly motionless, with her the pleasant task of polishing the hands placed together, and her long smooth cheeks, and combing the dishev- lashes sweeping her cheeks — to reelled silk; but when, a little later, the peat two verses of a hymn which Janet small maiden was riding down stairs in had taught her. My nerves quivered a my arms, I envied no one.

little when I saw that Susan Halliday At sight of the bread and milk, my had also been duly prepared for the cherub was transformed into a hungry night, and had been put in the same human child, chiefly anxious to reach attitude, so far as her jointless anatomy the bottom of her porringer. I was permitted. This being ended, the doll with her a great deal that day. She and her mistress reposed together, and gave no manner of trouble: it was like only an occasional toss of the vigorous having the charge of a floating butter- limbs, or a stifled baby murmur, would Ay, endowed with warm arms to clasp, thenceforth prove, through the dark

silvery voice to prattle. I sent ened hours, that the one figure had in Janet out to sail, with the other ser- it more of life than the other. vants, by way of holiday, and Marian's On the next morning Kenmure and perfect temperament was shown in the Laura came back to us, and I walked way she watched the departing. down to receive them at the boat. I

“There they go,” she said, as she had forgotten how striking was their stood and danced at the window. "Now appearance, as they stood together

. His

broad, strong, Saxon look, his noble “What?" I said, “ are you pleased bearing and clear blue eyes, enhanced your friends

go
?.

the fascination of her darker beauty. “Yes," she answered ; “but I shall America is full of the short - lived

bloom and freshness of girlhood ; but

and a

66

they are out of sight.”

to have

command of an instrument to play up- instrument was taken up by Messrs. on it with pleasure. How often, when Mason and Hamlin, who have covered we have been listening to the swelling it with improvements, and rendered it music of the cabinet organs at the ware- one of the most pleasing musical inrooms of Messrs. Mason and Hamlin struments in the possession of mankind. in Broadway, have we desired to put one When we remarked above, that the of those instruments in every clerk's American piano was the best in the boarding-house room, and tell him to world, we only expressed the opinion take all the ennui, and half the peril, of others; but now that we assert the out of his life by learning to play upon superiority of the American cabinet it! No business man who works as organ over similar instruments made intensely as we do can keep alive the in London and Paris, we are communicelestial harmonies within him, —no, cating knowledge of our own. Indeed, nor the early wrinkles from his face, the superiority is so marked that it is without some such pleasant mingling apparent to the merest tyro in music. of bodily rest and mental exercise as During the year 1866, the number of playing upon an instrument.

these instruments produced in the The simplicity of the means by United States by the twenty-five manuwhich music is produced from the cab- facturers was about fifteen thousand, inet organ is truly remarkable. It is which were sold for one million six called a “reed " instrument; which hundred thousand dollars, or a little leads many to suppose that the cane- more than one hundred dollars each. brake is despoiled to procure its sound- Messrs. Mason and Hamlin, who mangiving apparatus. Not so. The reed ufacture one fourth of the whole numemployed is nothing but a thin strip of ber, produce thirty-five kinds, varying brass with a tongue slit in it, the vibra- in power, compass, and decoration, and tion of which causes the musical sound. in price from seventy-five dollars to One of the reeds, though it produces twelve hundred. In the new towns of a volume of sound only surpassed by the great West, the cabinet organ is the pipes of an organ, weighs about an usually the first instrument of music ounce, and can be carried in a vest- to arrive, and, of late years, it takes its pocket. In fact, a cabinet organ is place with the piano in the fashionable simply an accordeon of immense pow. drawing-rooms of the Atlantic States. er and improved mechanism. Twen- Few Americans, we presume, exty years ago, one of our melodeon- pected that the department of the Paris makers chanced to observe that the Exposition in which the United States accordeon produced a better tone when should most surpass other nations it was drawn out than when it was would be that appropriated to musical pushed in; and this fact suggested the instruments. Even our cornets and first great improvement in the melo bugles are highly commended in Paris. deon. Before that time, the wind from The cabinet organs, according to sevthe bellows, in all melodeons, was eral correspondents, are much admired. forced through the reeds. Melodeons We can hardly credit the assertion on the improved principle were con- of an intelligent correspondent of the structed so that the wind was drawn Tribune, that the superiority of the through the reeds. The credit of in- American pianos is not “questioned" troducing this improvement is due to by Erard, Pleyel, and Hertz, but we the well-known firm of Carhart, Need- can well believe that it is acknowledged ham, & Co., and it was as decided an by the great players congregated at improvement in the melodeon as the in- Paris. The aged Rossini is reported troduction of the hammer in the harpsi- to have said, after listening to an chord.

American piano, “ It is like a nightinAt this point of development, the gale cooing in a thunder-storm.”

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As I sit sometimes in the twilight,

And call back to life in the coals
Old faces and hopes and fancies

Long buried, - good rest to their souls !

Her face shines out of the embers;

I see her holding the light,
And hear the crunch of the gravel

And the sweep of the rain that night.

'T is a face that can never grow older,

That never can part with its gleam ; 'T is a gracious possession forever,

For what is it all but a dream ?

AN ARTIST'S DREAM.

WHE

THEN I reached Kenmure's house, human greetings that night, there would

one August evening, it was rath- be plenty in the morning, since Marian er a disappointment to find that he would inevitably be pulling my eyelids and his charming Laura had absented apart before sunrise. themselves for twenty-four hours. I It seemed scarcely dawn when I was had not seen them since their marriage; roused by a little arm round my neck, my admiration for his varied genius and and waked to think I had one of Raher unvarying grace was at its height, phael's cherubs by my side. Fingers of and I was really annoyed at the delay. waxen softness were ruthlessly at work My fair cousin, with her usual exact

upon my eyes, and the little form that housekeeping, had prepared everything met my touch felt lithe and elastic, like for her guest, and then bequeathed a kitten's limbs. There was just light me, as she wrote, to Janet and baby enough to see the child, perched on the Marian. It was a pleasant arrange- edge of the bed, her soft blue dressingment, for between baby Marian and gown trailing over the white nightme there existed a species of passion, dress, while her black and long-fringed I might almost say of betrothal, ever eyes shone through the dimness of since that little three-year-old sunbeam morning. She yielded gladly to my had blessed my mother's house by lin- grasp, and I could fondle again the gering awhile in it, six months before. silken hair, the velvety brunette cheek, Still I went to bed disappointed, though the plump, childish shoulders. Yet sleep the delightful windows of the chamber still half held me, and when my cherub looked out upon the glimmering bay, appeare to hold it a cherubic practice and the swinging lanterns at the yard- to begin the day with a demand for arms of the frigates shone like some lively anecdote, I was fain drowsily to softer constellation beneath the bril- suggest that she might first tell some liant sky. The house was

stories to her doll. With the sunny upon the water that the cool waves readiness that was a part of her nature, seemed to plash deliciously against its she straightway turned to that young very basement; and it was a comfort lady, — plain Susan Halliday, with both to think that, if there were no adequate checks patched, and eyes of different colors, — and soon discoursed both her Life to her was no alternation of joy and me into repose.

so close

and grief, but only of joy and more When I waked again, it was to find joyous. the child conversing with the morning Twilight brought us to an improvised star, which still shone through the win- concert Climbing the piano-stool, she dow, scarcely so lucent as her eyes, went over the notes with her little taper and bidding it go home to its mother, fingers, touching the keys in a light, the sun. Another lapse into dreams, knowing way, that proved her a musiand then a more vivid awakening, and cian's child Then I must play for her, she had my ear at last, and won story and let the dance begin. This was a after story, requiting them with legends wondrous performance on her part, and of her own youth, “ almost a year ago," consisted at first in hopping up and down - how she was perilously lost, for in- on one spot, with no change of motion, stance, in the small front yard, with a but in her hands. She resembled a little playmate, early in the afternoon, minute and irrepressible Shaker, or a and how they came and peeped into the live and beautiful marionnette. Then window, and thought all the world had she placed Janet in the middle of the forgotten them. Then the sweet voice, floor, and performed the dance round distinct in its articulation as Laura's, her, after the manner of Vivien and went straying off into wilder fancies, a Merlin. Then came her supper, which, chaos of autobiography and conjecture, like its predecessors, was a solid and like the letters of a war correspondent. absorbing meal; then one more fairy You would have thought her little life story, to magnetize her off, and she bad yielded more pangs and fears than danced and sang herself up stairs. might have sufficed for the discovery And if she first came to me in the of the North Pole; but breakfast-time morning with a halo round her head, drew near at last, and Janet's honest she seemed still to retain it when I at voice was heard outside the door. I last watched her kneeling in the little rather envied the good Scotchwoman bed — perfectly motionless, with her the pleasant task of polishing the hands placed together, and her long smooth cheeks, and combing the dishev- lashes sweeping her cheeks -- to reelled silk; but when, a little later, the peat two verses of a hymn which Janet small maiden was riding down stairs in had taught her. My nerves quivered a my arms, I envied no one.

little when I saw that Susan Halliday At sight of the bread and milk, my had also been duly prepared for the cherub was transformed into a hungry night, and had been put in the same human child, chiefly anxious to reach attitude, so far as her jointless anatomy the bottom of her porringer. I was permitted. This being ended, the doll with her a great deal that day. She and her mistress reposed together, and gave no manner of trouble: it was like only an occasional toss of the vigorous having the charge of a floating butter- limbs, or a stifled baby murmur, would fly, endowed with warm arms to clasp, thenceforth prove, through the darkand a silvery voice to prattle. I sent ened hours, that the one figure had in Janet out to sail, with the other ser- it more of life than the other. vants, by way of holiday, and Marian's On the next morning Kenmure and perfect temperament was shown in the Laura came back to us, and I walked way she watched the departing.

down to receive them at the boat. I "There they go,” she said, as she had forgotten how striking was their stood and danced at the window. “Now they are out of sight.”

appearance, as they stood together. His

broad, strong, Saxon look, his noble “What!" I said, “are you pleased bearing and clear blue eyes, enhanced

?"

the fascination of her darker beauty. “Yes," she answered; “but I shall America is full of the short-lived be pleased-er to see them come back." bloom and freshness of girlhood ; but

to have your

friends go

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